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Editorial Board Members' Collection Series: Wearable Sensor System for Monitoring

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 December 2023) | Viewed by 1306

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento, Lecce, Italy
Interests: RFID systems; tag-based sensors; RFID solutions for bioelectromagnetics; textile materials; wireless power transmission and its biomedical applications
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, USA
Interests: biomedical signal processing; pattern recognition; wearable sensors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wearable devices often use physical, chemical or biosensors to monitor humans or animals in a non-invasive or minimally invasive way. Nowdays, wearable sensors are used in many fields in our lives including smartphones, smart watches and smart glasses. The application of wearable sensors covers health management, exercise monitoring, social interaction, casual games, audio-visual entertainment, positioning/navigation, mobile payment and many other fields.

Thus, this Special Issue is dedicated to collecting papers on the applications and challenges in wearable sensors, including, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • healthcare monitoring;
  • sports/physical monitoring;
  • human activity assessment;
  • motion tracking;
  • ECG/HRV/GSR;
  • physiological monitoring;
  • implantable sensors and devices;
  • flexible wearable sensors;
  • mental stress monitoring;
  • gait;
  • emotion recognition;
  • movement analysis;
  • rehabilitation;
  • injury prevention;
  • wearable antennas/microwave;
  • ambient-assisted living;
  • fall detection

Prof. Dr. Luciano Tarricone
Prof. Dr. Edward Sazonov
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

24 pages, 2941 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Postures and Moving Directions in Fire Evacuation in a Low-Visibility Environment
by Jingjing Yan, Gengen He, Anahid Basiri, Craig Hancock and Siegfried K. Yeboah
Sensors 2024, 24(5), 1378; https://doi.org/10.3390/s24051378 - 21 Feb 2024
Viewed by 727
Abstract
Walking speed is a significant aspect of evacuation efficiency, and this speed varies during fire emergencies due to individual physical abilities. However, in evacuations, it is not always possible to keep an upright posture, hence atypical postures, such as stoop walking or crawling, [...] Read more.
Walking speed is a significant aspect of evacuation efficiency, and this speed varies during fire emergencies due to individual physical abilities. However, in evacuations, it is not always possible to keep an upright posture, hence atypical postures, such as stoop walking or crawling, may be required for survival. In this study, a novel 3D passive vision-aided inertial system (3D PVINS) for indoor positioning was used to track the movement of 20 volunteers during an evacuation in a low visibility environment. Participants’ walking speeds using trunk flexion, trunk–knee flexion, and upright postures were measured. The investigations were carried out under emergency and non-emergency scenarios in vertical and horizontal directions, respectively. Results show that different moving directions led to a roughly 43.90% speed reduction, while posture accounted for over 17%. Gender, one of the key categories in evacuation models, accounted for less than 10% of the differences in speed. The speeds of participants under emergency scenarios when compared to non-emergency scenarios was also found to increase by 53.92–60% when moving in the horizontal direction, and by about 48.28–50% when moving in the vertical direction and descending downstairs. Our results also support the social force theory of the warming-up period, as well as the effect of panic on the facilitating occupants’ moving speed. Full article
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