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Piezoelectric Nanogenerators and Sensors

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 May 2024 | Viewed by 2179

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Physics – Center for Science and Education, Silesian University of Technology, Krasińskiego 8 Street, 40-019 Katowice, Poland
Interests: impedance spectroscopy; electron emission from ferroelectrics; fabrication and investigation of piezoelectric nanocomposites; fabrication and applications of piezoelectric and triboelectric nanogenerators; fabrication and applications of piezoelectric sensors

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Physics – Center for Science and Education, Silesian University of Technology, Krasińskiego 8 Street, 40-019 Katowice, Poland
Interests: sonochemically preparation of nanomaterials; growth of mono- and polycrystals of ferroelectrics and semiconductors; production of opals, opals filled with photoferroelectrics, and inverted opals of photoferroelectrics; measurements of electrical, optical and photoelectrical properties of semiconductors and ferroelectrics; gas nanosensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of the modern world has led to an increased demand for new types of energy sources and sensors. Significant recent progress in the field of nanotechnology has made it possible to effectively convert various types of energy into electrical output. Mechanical energy is the most common way to induce voltage generation since this form of energy can be found easily in a human environment. One of many physical phenomena that can be used is piezoelectricity, where the deformation of the crystal structure leads to the accumulation of electrical energy. Piezoelectric nanogenerators and sensors are important components used in many technologies. Moreover, piezoelectric nanogenerators based on various advanced materials may generate electrical energy by harvesting human motion energy and may thus support or even replace the traditional battery charging of mobiles. Piezoelectric materials are also widely used in sensing technology. They are used to measure pressure, strain, and many other physical quantities based on charge generation via material deformation.

The current Special Issue invites the submission of research that addresses and investigates the presentations of new nanomaterials and nanocomposites, new fabrication methods, and applications of piezoelectrics. Furthermore, the present Special Issue addresses the innovative design, fabrication, and end-of-use application of piezoelectric nanogenerators and sensors.

Dr. Bartłomiej Toroń
Dr. Piotr Szperlich
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • piezoelectric effect
  • piezoelectrics
  • nanotechnology
  • nanomaterials
  • nanocomposites
  • piezoelectric sensors
  • fabrication of materials
  • application of piezoelectrics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 3672 KiB  
Article
High-Sensitivity and Wide-Range Flexible Ionic Piezocapacitive Pressure Sensors with Porous Hemisphere Array Electrodes
by Bang Wu, Weiguang Wu, Rui Ma, Haobing Chen, Yilin Zhao, Yunfan Li, Xiao Lei and Feng Liu
Sensors 2024, 24(2), 366; https://doi.org/10.3390/s24020366 - 08 Jan 2024
Viewed by 735
Abstract
The development of high-performance flexible pressure sensors with porous hierarchical microstructures is limited by the complex and time-consuming preparation processes of porous hierarchical microstructures. In this study, a simple modified heat curing process was first proposed to achieve one-step preparation of porous hemispherical [...] Read more.
The development of high-performance flexible pressure sensors with porous hierarchical microstructures is limited by the complex and time-consuming preparation processes of porous hierarchical microstructures. In this study, a simple modified heat curing process was first proposed to achieve one-step preparation of porous hemispherical microstructures on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate. In this process, a laser-prepared template was used to form surface microstructures on PDMS film. Meanwhile, the thermal decomposition of glucose monohydrate additive during heat curing of PDMS led to the formation of porous structures within PDMS film. Further, based on the obtained PDMS/CNTs electrodes with porous hemisphere array and ionic polymer dielectric layers, high-performance ionic piezocapacitive sensors were realized. Under the synergistic effect of the low-stiffness porous hemisphere microstructure and the electric double layer of the ionic polymer film, the sensor based on an ionic polymer film with a 1:0.75 ratio of P(VDF-HFP):[EMIM][TFSI] not only achieves a sensitivity of up to 106.27 kPa−1 below 3 kPa, but also has a wide measurement range of over 400 kPa, which has obvious advantages in existing flexible piezocapacitive sensors. The rapid response time of 110 s and the good stability of 2300 cycles of the sensor further elucidate its practicality. The application of the sensor in pulse monitoring, speech recognition, and detection of multiple dynamic loads verifies its excellent sensing performance. In short, the proposed heat curing process can simultaneously form porous structures and surface microstructures on PDMS films, greatly simplifying the preparation process of porous hierarchical microstructures and providing a simple and feasible way to obtain high-performance flexible pressure sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Piezoelectric Nanogenerators and Sensors)
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22 pages, 5637 KiB  
Article
Piezotronic Antimony Sulphoiodide/Polyvinylidene Composite for Strain-Sensing and Energy-Harvesting Applications
by Jakub Jała, Bartłomiej Nowacki and Bartłomiej Toroń
Sensors 2023, 23(18), 7855; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23187855 - 13 Sep 2023
Viewed by 676
Abstract
This study investigates the piezoelectric and piezotronic properties of a novel composite material comprising polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and antimony sulphoiodide (SbSI) nanowires. The material preparation method is detailed, showcasing its simplicity and reproducibility. The material’s electrical resistivity, piezoelectric response, and energy-harvesting capabilities are [...] Read more.
This study investigates the piezoelectric and piezotronic properties of a novel composite material comprising polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and antimony sulphoiodide (SbSI) nanowires. The material preparation method is detailed, showcasing its simplicity and reproducibility. The material’s electrical resistivity, piezoelectric response, and energy-harvesting capabilities are systematically analyzed under various deflection conditions and excitation frequencies. The piezoelectric response is characterized by the generation of charge carriers in the material due to mechanical strain, resulting in voltage output. The fundamental phenomena of charge generation, along with their influence on the material’s resistivity, are proposed. Dynamic strain testing reveals the composite’s potential as a piezoelectric nanogenerator (PENG), converting mechanical energy into electrical energy. Comparative analyses highlight the composite’s power density advantages, thereby demonstrating its potential for energy-harvesting applications. This research provides insights into the interplay between piezoelectric and piezotronic phenomena in nanocomposites and their applicability in energy-harvesting devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Piezoelectric Nanogenerators and Sensors)
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