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Nanomaterials for Sensor Applications

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 4844

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, A*STAR, Singapore 138634, Singapore
Interests: nanomaterials; flexible sensors and soft actuators; printed electronics; smart wearables

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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620, China
Interests: mesoporous materials; advanced ceramics; gas sensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sensors play vital roles for humans, machines and infrastructures to sense the environment, and make our modern lives smarter and safer. Nanomaterials and nanotechnologies are the key driving force to advance the development of sensors, from popular temperature sensors, humidity sensors, and gas sensors for industry, aerospace, and agriculture to IoT and wearable sensors for health, metaverse and more applications.

This Special Issue, “Nanomaterials for Sensor Applications”, focuses on the recent advances in nanomaterials, from synthesis to device fabrication for various sensing applications. Some topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Nanomaterials and nanostructures;
  • Thin films and functional coatings;
  • Nanofabrication and nanodevices;
  • Physical sensors;
  • Chemical sensors;
  • Optoelectronic and photonic sensors;
  • Biosensors;
  • Electrochemical sensors;
  • MEMS;
  • IoT sensors;
  • Printed sensors;
  • Flexible and wearable sensors;
  • Fabric sensors and e-textiles;
  • Sensor integration and miniaturisation.

It is our pleasure to invite you to submit your recent research in nanomaterials for sensing applications to this Special Issue, which provides an excellent opportunity to publish your work through this open access journal. Submissions of communications, full papers, and reviews are all welcome. We look forward to your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Hui Huang
Prof. Dr. Wei Luo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • nanostructures
  • nanotechnology
  • sensors
  • smart wearable
  • printed electronics

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

22 pages, 7164 KiB  
Article
Selective and Accurate Detection of Nitrate in Aquaculture Water with Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Using Gold Nanoparticles Decorated with β-Cyclodextrins
by Zhen Li, Yang Hu, Liu Wang, Houfang Liu, Tianling Ren, Cong Wang and Daoliang Li
Sensors 2024, 24(4), 1093; https://doi.org/10.3390/s24041093 - 7 Feb 2024
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1260
Abstract
A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) method for measuring nitrate nitrogen in aquaculture water was developed using a substrate of β-cyclodextrin-modified gold nanoparticles (SH-β-CD@AuNPs). Addressing the issues of low sensitivity, narrow linear range, and relatively poor selectivity of single metal nanoparticles in the SERS [...] Read more.
A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) method for measuring nitrate nitrogen in aquaculture water was developed using a substrate of β-cyclodextrin-modified gold nanoparticles (SH-β-CD@AuNPs). Addressing the issues of low sensitivity, narrow linear range, and relatively poor selectivity of single metal nanoparticles in the SERS detection of nitrate nitrogen, we combined metal nanoparticles with cyclodextrin supramolecular compounds to prepare a AuNPs substrate enveloped by cyclodextrin, which exhibits ultra-high selectivity and Raman activity. Subsequently, vanadium(III) chloride was used to convert nitrate ions into nitrite ions. The adsorption mechanism between the reaction product benzotriazole (BTAH) of o-phenylenediamine (OPD) and nitrite ions on the SH-β-CD@AuNPs substrate was studied through SERS, achieving the simultaneous detection of nitrate nitrogen and nitrite nitrogen. The experimental results show that BTAH exhibits distinct SERS characteristic peaks at 1168, 1240, 1375, and 1600 cm−1, with the lowest detection limits of 3.33 × 10−2, 5.84 × 10−2, 2.40 × 10−2, and 1.05 × 10−2 μmol/L, respectively, and a linear range of 0.1–30.0 μmol/L. The proposed method provides an effective tool for the selective and accurate online detection of nitrite and nitrate nitrogen in aquaculture water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Sensor Applications)
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15 pages, 13225 KiB  
Article
Application of p and n-Type Silicon Nanowires as Human Respiratory Sensing Device
by Elham Fakhri, Muhammad Taha Sultan, Andrei Manolescu, Snorri Ingvarsson and Halldor Gudfinnur Svavarsson
Sensors 2023, 23(24), 9901; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23249901 - 18 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 983
Abstract
Accurate and fast breath monitoring is of great importance for various healthcare applications, for example, medical diagnoses, studying sleep apnea, and early detection of physiological disorders. Devices meant for such applications tend to be uncomfortable for the subject (patient) and pricey. Therefore, there [...] Read more.
Accurate and fast breath monitoring is of great importance for various healthcare applications, for example, medical diagnoses, studying sleep apnea, and early detection of physiological disorders. Devices meant for such applications tend to be uncomfortable for the subject (patient) and pricey. Therefore, there is a need for a cost-effective, lightweight, small-dimensional, and non-invasive device whose presence does not interfere with the observed signals. This paper reports on the fabrication of a highly sensitive human respiratory sensor based on silicon nanowires (SiNWs) fabricated by a top-down method of metal-assisted chemical-etching (MACE). Besides other important factors, reducing the final cost of the sensor is of paramount importance. One of the factors that increases the final price of the sensors is using gold (Au) electrodes. Herein, we investigate the sensor’s response using aluminum (Al) electrodes as a cost-effective alternative, considering the fact that the electrode’s work function is crucial in electronic device design, impacting device electronic properties and electron transport efficiency at the electrode–semiconductor interface. Therefore a comparison is made between SiNWs breath sensors made from both p-type and n-type silicon to investigate the effect of the dopant and electrode type on the SiNWs respiratory sensing functionality. A distinct directional variation was observed in the sample’s response with Au and Al electrodes. Finally, performing a qualitative study revealed that the electrical resistance across the SiNWs renders greater sensitivity to breath than to dry air pressure. No definitive research demonstrating the mechanism behind these effects exists, thus prompting our study to investigate the underlying process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Sensor Applications)
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22 pages, 7784 KiB  
Article
Graphene Inks Printed by Aerosol Jet for Sensing Applications: The Role of Dispersant on the Inks’ Formulation and Performance
by Ahmad Al Shboul, Mohsen Ketabi, Daniella Skaf, Audithya Nyayachavadi, Thierry Lai Fak Yu, Tom Rautureau, Simon Rondeau-Gagné and Ricardo Izquierdo
Sensors 2023, 23(16), 7151; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23167151 - 13 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1986
Abstract
This study presents graphene inks produced through the liquid-phase exfoliation of graphene flakes in water using optimized concentrations of dispersants (gelatin, triton X-100, and tween-20). The study explores and compares the effectiveness of the three different dispersants in creating stable and conductive inks. [...] Read more.
This study presents graphene inks produced through the liquid-phase exfoliation of graphene flakes in water using optimized concentrations of dispersants (gelatin, triton X-100, and tween-20). The study explores and compares the effectiveness of the three different dispersants in creating stable and conductive inks. These inks can be printed onto polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates using an aerosol jet printer. The investigation aims to identify the most suitable dispersant to formulate a high-quality graphene ink for potential applications in printed electronics, particularly in developing chemiresistive sensors for IoT applications. Our findings indicate that triton X-100 is the most effective dispersant for formulating graphene ink (GTr), which demonstrated electrical conductivity (4.5 S·cm−1), a high nanofiller concentration of graphene flakes (12.2%) with a size smaller than 200 nm (<200 nm), a low dispersant-to-graphene ratio (5%), good quality as measured by Raman spectroscopy (ID/IG ≈ 0.27), and good wettability (θ ≈ 42°) over PET. The GTr’s ecological benefits, combined with its excellent printability and good conductivity, make it an ideal candidate for manufacturing chemiresistive sensors that can be used for Internet of Things (IoT) healthcare and environmental applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Sensor Applications)
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