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Graphene-Based Sensors: Design, Development and Application

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 May 2024 | Viewed by 5697
Please contact the Guest Editor or the Section Managing Editor at (ava.jiang@mdpi.com) for any queries.

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Engineering, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK
Interests: optical fibre sensors; Lossy mode resonance; graphene; graphene oxide; nanostructured coatings

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Guest Editor
School of Engineering, Faculty of Science, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK
Interests: optical fiber sensors; thin-films; graphene oxide; graphene; reduced graphene oxide; sensors; physical sensors; chemical sensors; biosensors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología del Carbono, INCAR-CSIC, Francisco Pintado Fe 26, 33011 Oviedo, Spain
Interests: graphene-based materials; electrochemical sensors; sensitivity; selectivity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue compiles a set of innovative designs and developments on the use of graphene and graphene-like materials, as sensitive coatings, on a variety of sensors to detect and monitor targets. Due to the fact that each atom of graphene is a surface atom, graphene is extremely sensitive to the external environment. Its exciting potential has been combined in the works included in this Special Issue with the development of nanostructured coatings to develop a new generation of sensors with defined specificity.

This Special Issue aims to publish original research papers, as well as review articles, with a focus on various sensors (chemical sensors, biosensors, physical sensors, and so on) based on different sensing techniques and incorporating graphene-based materials.

Dr. Sonia Melendi-Espina
Dr. Miguel Hernaez
Dr. Zoraida González
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Graphene
  • Optical fiber sensors
  • Physical sensors
  • Chemical sensors
  • Biosensors
  • Electrochemical sensors
  • Electronic sensors
  • Sensing technique
  • Wearable sensors
  • Applications

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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18 pages, 5328 KiB  
Article
Graphene Oxide, Carbon Nanotubes, and Polyelectrolytes-Based Impedanciometric E-Tongue for Estrogen Detection in Complex Matrices
by Tiago Reis, Maria Helena Fino and Maria Raposo
Sensors 2024, 24(2), 481; https://doi.org/10.3390/s24020481 - 12 Jan 2024
Viewed by 650
Abstract
Currently, it is necessary to maintain the quality of aquifers and water bodies, which means the need for sensors that detect molecules as emerging pollutants (EPs) at low concentrations in aqueous complex solutions. In this work, an electronic tongue (e-tongue) prototype was developed [...] Read more.
Currently, it is necessary to maintain the quality of aquifers and water bodies, which means the need for sensors that detect molecules as emerging pollutants (EPs) at low concentrations in aqueous complex solutions. In this work, an electronic tongue (e-tongue) prototype was developed to detect 17β-estradiol in tap water. To achieve such a prototype, an array of sensors was prepared. Each sensor consists of a solid support with interdigitated electrodes without or with thin films prepared with graphene oxide, nanotubes, and other polyelectrolytes molecules adsorbed on them. To collect data from each sensor, impedance spectroscopy was used to analyze the electrical characteristics of samples of estrogen solutions with different concentrations. To analyze the collected data from the sensors, principal components analysis (PCA) method was used to create a three-dimensional plane using the calculated principal components, namely PC1 and PC2, and the estrogen concentration values. Then, damped least squares (DLS) was used to find the optimal values for the hyperplane calibration, as the sensitivity of this e-tongue was not represented by a straight line but by a surface. For the collected data, from nanotubes and graphene oxide sensors, a calibration curve for concentration given by the 10PC1×0.492−PC2×0.14–14.5 surface was achieved. This e-tongue presented a detection limit of 10−16 M of 17β-estradiol in tap water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Graphene-Based Sensors: Design, Development and Application)
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13 pages, 2387 KiB  
Article
Highly Sensitive Amperometric Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide in Saliva Based on N-Doped Graphene Nanoribbons and MnO2 Modified Carbon Paste Electrodes
by Ema Gričar, Kurt Kalcher, Boštjan Genorio and Mitja Kolar
Sensors 2021, 21(24), 8301; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21248301 - 11 Dec 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2746
Abstract
Four different graphene-based nanomaterials (htGO, N-htGO, htGONR, and N-htGONR) were synthesized, characterized, and used as a modifier of carbon paste electrode (CPE) in order to produce a reliable, precise, and highly sensitive non-enzymatic amperometric hydrogen peroxide sensor for complex matrices. CPE, with their [...] Read more.
Four different graphene-based nanomaterials (htGO, N-htGO, htGONR, and N-htGONR) were synthesized, characterized, and used as a modifier of carbon paste electrode (CPE) in order to produce a reliable, precise, and highly sensitive non-enzymatic amperometric hydrogen peroxide sensor for complex matrices. CPE, with their robustness, reliability, and ease of modification, present a convenient starting point for the development of new sensors. Modification of CPE was optimized by systematically changing the type and concentration of materials in the modifier and studying the prepared electrode surface by cyclic voltammetry. N-htGONR in combination with manganese dioxide (1:1 ratio) proved to be the most appropriate material for detection of hydrogen peroxide in pharmaceutical and saliva matrices. The developed sensor exhibited a wide linear range (1.0–300 µM) and an excellent limit of detection (0.08 µM) and reproducibility, as well as high sensitivity and stability. The sensor was successfully applied to real sample analysis, where the recovery values for a commercially obtained pharmaceutical product were between 94.3% and 98.0%. Saliva samples of a user of the pharmaceutical product were also successfully analyzed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Graphene-Based Sensors: Design, Development and Application)
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Review

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24 pages, 1396 KiB  
Review
The State of the Art on Graphene-Based Sensors for Human Health Monitoring through Breath Biomarkers
by Pedro Catalão Moura, Paulo António Ribeiro, Maria Raposo and Valentina Vassilenko
Sensors 2023, 23(22), 9271; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23229271 - 19 Nov 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1354
Abstract
The field of organic-borne biomarkers has been gaining relevance due to its suitability for diagnosing pathologies and health conditions in a rapid, accurate, non-invasive, painless and low-cost way. Due to the lack of analytical techniques with features capable of analysing such a complex [...] Read more.
The field of organic-borne biomarkers has been gaining relevance due to its suitability for diagnosing pathologies and health conditions in a rapid, accurate, non-invasive, painless and low-cost way. Due to the lack of analytical techniques with features capable of analysing such a complex matrix as the human breath, the academic community has focused on developing electronic noses based on arrays of gas sensors. These sensors are assembled considering the excitability, sensitivity and sensing capacities of a specific nanocomposite, graphene. In this way, graphene-based sensors can be employed for a vast range of applications that vary from environmental to medical applications. This review work aims to gather the most relevant published papers under the scope of “Graphene sensors” and “Biomarkers” in order to assess the state of the art in the field of graphene sensors for the purposes of biomarker identification. During the bibliographic search, a total of six pathologies were identified as the focus of the work. They were lung cancer, gastric cancer, chronic kidney diseases, respiratory diseases that involve inflammatory processes of the airways, like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sleep apnoea and diabetes. The achieved results, current development of the sensing sensors, and main limitations or challenges of the field of graphene sensors are discussed throughout the paper, as well as the features of the experiments addressed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Graphene-Based Sensors: Design, Development and Application)
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