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Nanosensors for Chemical and Biological Detection

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 2946

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan
Interests: design of memory cell; reliability modeling based on the semiconductor physics; total memory system

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biochemical reactions occur inside the cell of organisms—not only due to the life process of organisms but also infection of viruses invading from outside the cell. The biochemical reactions can be modeled using chemical reactions of biomolecules. If the size of biomolecules ranges from several nanometers to a couple of 100 nanometers, the sensing tip of the sensing system (nanosensor) to detect biochemical reactions should be on a nanometer scale. The sensing tip with a well-designed geometry, shape, and surface (or interface) of a suitably chosen material (biocompatible material) is exposed to a specimen which detection targets (specific biomolecule) are dissociated in. The sensing tip is the finest component of nanosensors and is sensitive to any kind of responses to biochemical reactions—electric, electronic, magnetic, optical responses, etc. There may be various biocompatible materials and various designs and geometries depending on various responses. The sensing tip also takes a central role in converting detected biochemical reaction to a visible (macroscopic) signal. The detected responses are collected without involving noise or nonspecific reactions so that we can detect only specific biochemical reactions. Nanosensors are applicable to sensors of toxic gases, (biological) viruses, hazardous molecules, antigen–antibody reactions, and various biochemical reactions.

This Special Issue aims to cover all various aspects of the nanosensor and its related scientific and technical topics, including (but not limited to) functions, materials, geometries, any detailed designs of sensing tips, the conversion method to visible signals, specific biochemical reactions to be sensed, nonspecific noise, and so forth.

Dr. Hiroshi Watanabe
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biochemistry
  • virus sensors
  • biocompatible materials
  • biomolecules
  • interface
  • antigen–antibody reaction
  • toxic gas sensors
  • hazardous molecule sensors

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 6559 KiB  
Article
Aggregation and Oligomerization Characterization of ß-Lactoglobulin Protein Using a Solid-State Nanopore Sensor
by Mitu C. Acharjee, Brad Ledden, Brian Thomas, Xianglan He, Troy Messina, Jason Giurleo, David Talaga and Jiali Li
Sensors 2024, 24(1), 81; https://doi.org/10.3390/s24010081 - 22 Dec 2023
Viewed by 919
Abstract
Protein aggregation is linked to many chronic and devastating neurodegenerative human diseases and is strongly associated with aging. This work demonstrates that protein aggregation and oligomerization can be evaluated by a solid-state nanopore method at the single molecule level. A silicon nitride nanopore [...] Read more.
Protein aggregation is linked to many chronic and devastating neurodegenerative human diseases and is strongly associated with aging. This work demonstrates that protein aggregation and oligomerization can be evaluated by a solid-state nanopore method at the single molecule level. A silicon nitride nanopore sensor was used to characterize both the amyloidogenic and native-state oligomerization of a model protein ß-lactoglobulin variant A (βLGa). The findings from the nanopore measurements are validated against atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) data, comparing βLGa aggregation from the same samples at various stages. By calibrating with linear and circular dsDNA, this study estimates the amyloid fibrils’ length and diameter, the quantity of the βLGa aggregates, and their distribution. The nanopore results align with the DLS and AFM data and offer additional insight at the level of individual protein molecular assemblies. As a further demonstration of the nanopore technique, βLGa self-association and aggregation at pH 4.6 as a function of temperature were measured at high (2 M KCl) and low (0.1 M KCl) ionic strength. This research highlights the advantages and limitations of using solid-state nanopore methods for analyzing protein aggregation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanosensors for Chemical and Biological Detection)
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Review

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15 pages, 4573 KiB  
Review
The Application of Graphene Field-Effect Transistor Biosensors in COVID-19 Detection Technology: A Review
by Qin-Hong Liang, Ban-Peng Cao, Qiang Xiao and Dacheng Wei
Sensors 2023, 23(21), 8764; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23218764 - 27 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1278
Abstract
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a disease caused by the infectious agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The primary method of diagnosing SARS-CoV-2 is nucleic acid detection, but this method requires specialized equipment and is time consuming. Therefore, a [...] Read more.
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a disease caused by the infectious agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The primary method of diagnosing SARS-CoV-2 is nucleic acid detection, but this method requires specialized equipment and is time consuming. Therefore, a sensitive, simple, rapid, and low-cost diagnostic test is needed. Graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) biosensors have become the most promising diagnostic technology for detecting SARS-CoV-2 due to their advantages of high sensitivity, fast-detection speed, label-free operation, and low detection limit. This review mainly focus on three types of GFET biosensors to detect SARS-CoV-2. GFET biosensors can quickly identify SARS-CoV-2 within ultra-low detection limits. Finally, we will outline the pros and cons of the diagnostic approaches as well as future directions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanosensors for Chemical and Biological Detection)
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