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Wetlands Mapping: Challenges, Trends and Opportunities

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Remote Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2023) | Viewed by 1523

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Aerospace Information Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100094, China
Interests: wetland remote sensing; wetland biodiversity mapping; assessment of wetland protection
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Beijing Laboratory of Water Security, Base of the State Key Laboratory of Urban Environment Process and Digital Modeling, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100089, China
Interests: remote sensing application in ecohydrology and hydrobiology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130102, China
Interests: wetland classification; mapping wetland; wetland landscape pattern and process
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A combination of the increasing volume of high and very high resolution earth observation (EO) data available in an open access format; the significant progress made in terms of storage, management, processing and analysis of this information; and the advances in machine learning (such as artificial intelligence) tools has led to progress in the wetland mapping of various wetland classes using various scales of EO technologies. The advances within relevant products can effectively support the implementation of wetland management, conservation and restoration of wetland ecosystems at local and national levels.

This Special Issue, therefore, aims to compile original research and review articles on recent advances, technologies, solutions, applications, and new challenges in the field of wetland remote sensing mapping.

Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • Application of big data on wetland inventories, evaluation and management.
  • New algorithms, indicators and tools for wetland mapping.
  • Development of new wetland-related datasets at local and regional scales.
  • Wetland thematic mapping (surface water/mangroves/ coastal) related to reporting obligations, such as Ramsar or the SDG indicator 6.6.1 "Extent and trends of water-related ecosystems".

Prof. Dr. Zhenguo Niu
Prof. Dr. Yinghai Ke
Prof. Dr. Dehua Mao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wetland mapping
  • remote sensing
  • global wetlands
  • coastal wetlands
  • inland water
  • sensors
  • cloud computing

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

17 pages, 7617 KiB  
Article
Remote Sensing Temporal Reconstruction of the Flooded Area in “Tablas de Daimiel” Inland Wetland 2000–2021
by Jesús Pena-Regueiro, Javier Estornell, Jesús Aguilar-Maldonado and Maria-Teresa Sebastiá-Frasquet
Sensors 2023, 23(8), 4096; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23084096 - 19 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1048
Abstract
Tablas de Daimiel National Park (TDNP) is a unique inland wetland located in the Mancha plain (Spain). It is recognized at the international level, and it is protected by different figures, such as Biosphere Reserve. However, this ecosystem is endangered due to aquifer [...] Read more.
Tablas de Daimiel National Park (TDNP) is a unique inland wetland located in the Mancha plain (Spain). It is recognized at the international level, and it is protected by different figures, such as Biosphere Reserve. However, this ecosystem is endangered due to aquifer overexploitation, and it is at risk of losing its protection figures. The objective of our study is to analyze the evolution of the flooded area between the year 2000 and 2021 by Landsat (5, 7 and 8) and Sentinel-2 images, and to assess the TDNP state through an anomaly analysis of the total water body surface. Several water indices were tested, but the NDWI index for Sentinel-2 (threshold −0.20), the MNDWI for Landsat-5 (threshold −0.15), and the MNDWI for Landsat-8 (threshold −0.25) showed the highest accuracy to calculate the flooded surface inside the protected area’s limits. During the period 2015–2021, we compared the performance of Landsat-8 and Sentinel-2 and an R2 value of 0.87 was obtained for this analysis, indicating a high correspondence between both sensors. Our results indicate a high variability of the flooded areas during the analyzed period with significant peaks, the most notorious in the second quarter of 2010. Minimum flooded areas were observed with negative precipitation index anomalies since fourth quarter of 2004 to fourth quarter of 2009. This period corresponds to a severe drought that affected this region and caused important deterioration. No significant correlation was observed between water surface anomalies and precipitation anomalies, and the significant correlation with flow and piezometric anomalies was moderate. This can be explained because of the complexity of water uses in this wetland, which includes illegal wells and the geological heterogeneity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wetlands Mapping: Challenges, Trends and Opportunities)
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