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High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 June 2024) | Viewed by 2994

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
TeSP Course Coordinator in Cybersecurity and Computer Networks, Coordinator of the TeSP course in Networks and Computer Systems, Coordinator Professor of the Department of Informatics Engineering at Higher School of Technology and Management, Polytechnique of Leiria, RUN-REGIONAL UNIVERSITY NETWORK.EU, and researcher of the “Instituto de Telecomunicações”, 2411-901 Leiria, Portugal
Interests: optoelectronic technologies; photonic devices and sensors; wireless communications; cybersecurity; Internet of Things; 3D printed objects; artificial intelligence in optical domain

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

High-resolution spectroscopy and sensing have emerged as powerful techniques for exploring and understanding the intricacies of various materials and systems. The Journal Sensor is pleased to announce a special issue dedicated to the advancements and applications of high-resolution spectroscopy and sensing. This special issue aims to bring together cutting-edge research and innovative methodologies that push the boundaries of high-resolution spectroscopy and sensing across diverse scientific domains.

Researchers and scientists from academia and industry are invited to submit their original contributions to this special issue. All submissions must adhere to the Journal Sensors guidelines and will undergo a rigorous peer-review process to ensure the quality and scientific validity of the published articles.

The Special Issue on High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing invites original research articles, reviews, and short communications in the following areas (but not limited to):

  • Novel spectroscopic techniques and instrumentation
  • High-resolution spectroscopy for material characterization
  • Ultrafast spectroscopy and its applications
  • Advances in quantum spectroscopy
  • Spectroscopic imaging and hyperspectral imaging
  • Spectroscopy for biomedical and clinical applications
  • Spectroscopic sensing for environmental monitoring
  • Advances in spectroscopic analysis of nanoparticles and nanomaterials
  • Spectroscopy for chemical and biological sensing
  • Computational spectroscopy and data analysis techniques

Prof. Dr. Joao da Silva Pereira
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 2711 KiB  
Article
Sub-PPB Detection with Gas-Phase Multiphoton Electron Extraction Spectroscopy under Ambient Conditions
by Tikhon Filippov, Elena Vervitski, Hila Kofler, Lea Birkan, Shaked Levy, Shay Zimmerman, Valery Bulatov, Israel Schechter and Roman Schuetz
Sensors 2024, 24(7), 2040; https://doi.org/10.3390/s24072040 - 22 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1197
Abstract
Multiphoton electron extraction spectroscopy (MEES) is an advanced analytical technique that has demonstrated exceptional sensitivity and specificity for detecting molecular traces on solid and liquid surfaces. Building upon the solid-state MEES foundations, this study introduces the first application of MEES in the gas [...] Read more.
Multiphoton electron extraction spectroscopy (MEES) is an advanced analytical technique that has demonstrated exceptional sensitivity and specificity for detecting molecular traces on solid and liquid surfaces. Building upon the solid-state MEES foundations, this study introduces the first application of MEES in the gas phase (gas-phase MEES), specifically designed for quantitative detection of gas traces at sub-part per billion (sub-PPB) concentrations under ambient atmospheric conditions. Our experimental setup utilizes resonant multiphoton ionization processes using ns laser pulses under a high electrical field. The generated photoelectron charges are recorded as a function of the laser’s wavelength. This research showcases the high sensitivity of gas-phase MEES, achieving high spectral resolution with resonant peak widths less than 0.02 nm FWHM. We present results from quantitative analysis of benzene and aniline, two industrially and environmentally significant compounds, demonstrating linear responses in the sub-PPM and sub-PPB ranges. The enhanced sensitivity and resolution of gas-phase MEES offer a powerful approach to trace gas analysis, with potential applications in environmental monitoring, industrial safety, security screening, and medical diagnostics. This study confirms the advantages of gas-phase MEES over many traditional optical spectroscopic methods and demonstrates its potential in direct gas-trace sensing in ambient atmosphere. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing)
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12 pages, 4083 KiB  
Article
Characterization of Functional Coatings on Cork Stoppers with Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Imaging
by Miguel F. S. Ferreira, Diana Guimarães, Rafaela Oliveira, Tomás Lopes, Diana Capela, José Marrafa, Pedro Meneses, Armindo Oliveira, Carlos Baptista, Tiago Gomes, Sérgio Moutinho, José Coelho, Raquel Nunes da Silva, Nuno A. Silva and Pedro A. S. Jorge
Sensors 2023, 23(22), 9133; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23229133 - 12 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1395
Abstract
Evaluating the efficiency of surface treatments is a problem of paramount importance for the cork stopper industry. Generically, these treatments create coatings that aim to enhance the impermeability and lubrification of cork stoppers. Yet, current methods of surface analysis are typically time-consuming, destructive, [...] Read more.
Evaluating the efficiency of surface treatments is a problem of paramount importance for the cork stopper industry. Generically, these treatments create coatings that aim to enhance the impermeability and lubrification of cork stoppers. Yet, current methods of surface analysis are typically time-consuming, destructive, have poor representativity or rely on indirect approaches. In this work, the use of a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) imaging solution is explored for evaluating the presence of coating along the cylindrical surface and in depth. To test it, several cork stoppers with different shaped areas of untreated surface were analyzed by LIBS, making a rectangular grid of spots with multiple shots per spot, to try to identify the correspondent shape. Results show that this technique can detect the untreated area along with other features, such as leakage and holes, allowing for a high success rate of identification and for its performance at different depths, paving the way for future industry-grade quality control solutions with more complex surface analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing)
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