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Nanomaterials for Chemical Sensors 2023

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 June 2024 | Viewed by 1474

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Chemical Sensors and Optical Molecular Spectroscopy, Institute of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna, Austria
Interests: physicochemical basis of sensors; chemical sensors; physical sensors; metrology; supramolecular chemistry; molecular recognition; molecular imprinting; anisotropic phases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The needle eye in developing sensors is the design of innovative materials. Thus, this Special Issue focuses on the detection process by coatings. The most innovative trends in this field were initiated by nanotechnology in the last few decades. This strategy meets the following challenges of modern chemical sensors: miniaturization, fast responses, reversibility, low energy consumption, and low cost. All these sensor materials have to be combined with suitable transducers such as mass sensitive devices, as well as resistive, capacitive, electrochemical, and optical detection methods. Measurements are possible both in the gaseous and liquid phases.

In principle, nearly all modern chemical sensors are designed in nanodimensions. This is especially true for the height of chemical coating. Preferably, the materials are organized in nanoparticles. In this case, diffusion occurs in three dimensions, leading to fast response times. These particles may consist of both organic and inorganic materials. The sensor effects are improved by adapting the polarity of the adsorption/absorption material to the analyte. Furthermore, selectivity is achieved by molecular recognition via supramolecular chemistry. This can be realized, e.g., by molecular imprinting, which leads to highly robust materials. Complex analytes in solution can also be recognized by biomolecules such as aptamers.

Thus, selectivity and high sensitivity can be achieved by molecular interactions in a nanosystem, which leads to fast responses and reversibility.

Prof. Dr. Franz L. Dickert
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

35 pages, 5383 KiB  
Review
Sensory Polymers: Trends, Challenges, and Prospects Ahead
by Cintia Virumbrales, Raquel Hernández-Ruiz, Miriam Trigo-López, Saúl Vallejos and José M. García
Sensors 2024, 24(12), 3852; https://doi.org/10.3390/s24123852 - 14 Jun 2024
Viewed by 119
Abstract
In recent years, sensory polymers have evolved significantly, emerging as versatile and cost-effective materials valued for their flexibility and lightweight nature. These polymers have transformed into sophisticated, active systems capable of precise detection and interaction, driving innovation across various domains, including smart materials, [...] Read more.
In recent years, sensory polymers have evolved significantly, emerging as versatile and cost-effective materials valued for their flexibility and lightweight nature. These polymers have transformed into sophisticated, active systems capable of precise detection and interaction, driving innovation across various domains, including smart materials, biomedical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and industrial safety. Their unique responsiveness to specific stimuli has sparked considerable interest and exploration in numerous applications. However, along with these advancements, notable challenges need to be addressed. Issues such as wearable technology integration, biocompatibility, selectivity and sensitivity enhancement, stability and reliability improvement, signal processing optimization, IoT integration, and data analysis pose significant hurdles. When considered collectively, these challenges present formidable barriers to the commercial viability of sensory polymer-based technologies. Addressing these challenges requires a multifaceted approach encompassing technological innovation, regulatory compliance, market analysis, and commercialization strategies. Successfully navigating these complexities is essential for unlocking the full potential of sensory polymers and ensuring their widespread adoption and impact across industries, while also providing guidance to the scientific community to focus their research on the challenges of polymeric sensors and to understand the future prospects where research efforts need to be directed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Chemical Sensors 2023)
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53 pages, 11095 KiB  
Review
Sensing Utilities of Cesium Lead Halide Perovskites and Composites: A Comprehensive Review
by Muthaiah Shellaiah, Kien Wen Sun, Natesan Thirumalaivasan, Mayank Bhushan and Arumugam Murugan
Sensors 2024, 24(8), 2504; https://doi.org/10.3390/s24082504 - 13 Apr 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 889
Abstract
Recently, the utilization of metal halide perovskites in sensing and their application in environmental studies have reached a new height. Among the different metal halide perovskites, cesium lead halide perovskites (CsPbX3; X = Cl, Br, and I) and composites have attracted [...] Read more.
Recently, the utilization of metal halide perovskites in sensing and their application in environmental studies have reached a new height. Among the different metal halide perovskites, cesium lead halide perovskites (CsPbX3; X = Cl, Br, and I) and composites have attracted great interest in sensing applications owing to their exceptional optoelectronic properties. Most CsPbX3 nanostructures and composites possess great structural stability, luminescence, and electrical properties for developing distinct optical and photonic devices. When exposed to light, heat, and water, CsPbX3 and composites can display stable sensing utilities. Many CsPbX3 and composites have been reported as probes in the detection of diverse analytes, such as metal ions, anions, important chemical species, humidity, temperature, radiation photodetection, and so forth. So far, the sensing studies of metal halide perovskites covering all metallic and organic–inorganic perovskites have already been reviewed in many studies. Nevertheless, a detailed review of the sensing utilities of CsPbX3 and composites could be helpful for researchers who are looking for innovative designs using these nanomaterials. Herein, we deliver a thorough review of the sensing utilities of CsPbX3 and composites, in the quantitation of metal ions, anions, chemicals, explosives, bioanalytes, pesticides, fungicides, cellular imaging, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), toxic gases, humidity, temperature, radiation, and photodetection. Furthermore, this review also covers the synthetic pathways, design requirements, advantages, limitations, and future directions for this material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Chemical Sensors 2023)
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