Terrain and Off-Highway Vehicle Safety

A topical collection in Safety (ISSN 2313-576X).

Viewed by 19944

Editor


E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Transport and Road Safety (TARS), University of New South Wales, Old Main Building (K15), Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
Interests: all terrain vehicles; motorcycle safety; road safety barriers; wire-rope barriers; rollover crashworthiness; cycling safety; go-kart safety; FEM crash and impact computer simulations; injury biomechanics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Quad-Bikes and Side by Side off-highway vehicles (All-Terrian Vehicles (ATVs), Recreational Off-Highway Vehicles (ROVs), Sport Utility Vehicles (SUVs), Utility Terrian Vehicles (UTVs), etc.) continue to contribute to fatalities and serious injuries that are occurring around the world. This has attracted a great deal of attention from health professionals, engineers, regulators, the farming sector, and other safety stake holders, particularly in the USA, Australia, New Zealand, Sweden, Canada, and other countries. The Editors of Safety have decided to set up a knowledge base repository, representing a collection of peer-reviewed papers focusing on the safety of these vehicles. It is hoped that as the collection of papers grows it will help advance human public health related to the use of these vehicles.

Therefore, the Editors of Safety are proposing expanding on the Special Issue that focused on this field of research (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/safety/special_issues/vehicle-safety) in 2015 by establishing the Topical Collection “Terrain and Off-Highway Vehicle Safety", which is now open for submissions. We call on researchers, regulators, and practitioners to submit their research papers, case reports, reviews, communications, and commentaries related to these vehicle.

Prof. Dr. Raphael Grzebieta
Collection Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Safety is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (2 papers)

2019

Jump to: 2017

13 pages, 867 KiB  
Article
Enforcement of Off-Road Vehicle Laws in Iowa
by Evelyn S. Qin, Gerene M. Denning and Charles A. Jennissen
Safety 2019, 5(2), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety5020022 - 23 Apr 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 6001
Abstract
Safety laws are among the most successful means of reducing injuries, but their effectiveness is strongly influenced by the level of enforcement. To characterize enforcement of off-road vehicle (ORV) laws statewide, analyses of citations were performed using Iowa Court Information System data. From [...] Read more.
Safety laws are among the most successful means of reducing injuries, but their effectiveness is strongly influenced by the level of enforcement. To characterize enforcement of off-road vehicle (ORV) laws statewide, analyses of citations were performed using Iowa Court Information System data. From 2005–2015, 5173 individuals were charged with 5643 citations issued. Citations averaged <5/county/year, decreased dramatically over time, and varied by county when normalized to registered all-terrain vehicles (ATVs). Over 90% of operators cited were male and Caucasian. One-fifth were <18 years old. The top five violations were: operation on a highway/snowmobile trail (51%), registration/identification number not documented/displayed (19%), prohibited use in a park/preserve (5.5%), and operation with more persons than the vehicle is designed to carry (4.4%). The Department of Natural Resources issued the highest percentage of citations, followed in decreasing order by Sheriff, Police, State Patrol, and Conservation officers. Significant differences were identified when citations were compared by sex, age, race, enforcement agency, disposition (guilty vs. not guilty), and when comparing counties with or without an ORV park. These characteristics suggest limited and variable enforcement of laws statewide that may reduce their potential to prevent deaths and injuries, and that improved strategies to support ORV law enforcement are needed. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

2017

Jump to: 2019

1211 KiB  
Article
Quad-Bike Operational Instability
by Ross H. Macmillan
Safety 2017, 3(2), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety3020015 - 31 May 2017
Viewed by 4824
Abstract
The stake-holders in the quad-bike (QB) industry in Australia have failed to reach a satisfactory resolution of the present impasse that exists with respect to the causes and mitigation of the trauma suffered by riders due to QB instability. In an effort to [...] Read more.
The stake-holders in the quad-bike (QB) industry in Australia have failed to reach a satisfactory resolution of the present impasse that exists with respect to the causes and mitigation of the trauma suffered by riders due to QB instability. In an effort to provide purchasers with data enabling them to discriminate between safer and less safe machines, static longitudinal and lateral tests have been conducted by various interested parties; quasi-static lateral tests have also been conducted under some operational conditions. It is argued that while these static tests are valid, under many operating conditions QBs will not reach such unstable slopes due to poor traction. Further, these tests do not include the quasi-static and dynamic factors which also influence the processes associated with operational instability. For these reasons, the static tests do not provide an adequate basis for discrimination between safer and less safe machines. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop