Driver/Rider Training

A special issue of Safety (ISSN 2313-576X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2016) | Viewed by 29332

Special Issue Editor

Faculty of Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
Interests: young and novice drivers and motorcyclists; education and training; graduated licensing; disadvantaged and vulnerable road users; policy and practice

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Driver and motorcyclist training continue to be popular as a presumed means to reduce road traffic crashes and related road trauma. The evidence to support this, however, is patchy. There are few evaluations that include actual crashes and/or injuries as outcome variables. Those that do tend to report a lack of impact and sometimes even increased crashes. It is important then to ensure that driver and rider training programs continue to be subject to evaluation and improvement, with the results widely disseminated. This Special Issue will focus on recent innovations and advances in the driver and rider training field that show promise in achieving the goal of reduced road trauma. Of particular interest are training program evaluations that include crash and/or injury outcomes or validated proxy measures.

Dr. Teresa Senserrick
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • driver training
  • motorcycle rider training
  • driver education
  • motorcycle rider education
  • road traffic crashes
  • road traffic injuries

Published Papers (5 papers)

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544 KiB  
Article
Enhancing Higher-Order Skills Education and Assessment in a Graduated Motorcycle Licensing System
Safety 2017, 3(2), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety3020014 - 13 Apr 2017
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4952
Abstract
Prior to 2016, motorcycle licensing in Victoria, Australia, required off-road (range) skills testing only, focusing on vehicle-handling skills. The objective of this research was to develop an education and assessment curriculum commensurate with best practice that included on-road components and increased focus on [...] Read more.
Prior to 2016, motorcycle licensing in Victoria, Australia, required off-road (range) skills testing only, focusing on vehicle-handling skills. The objective of this research was to develop an education and assessment curriculum commensurate with best practice that included on-road components and increased focus on awareness, judgment, and decision-making skills. No single best-practice curriculum was identified in the published literature. Therefore, to guide development of a new curriculum, a best-practice novice driver education framework, Goals for Driver Education, was adapted into the Goals for Rider Education framework. Applying Training Needs Analysis, the target population of learner motorcyclists was identified as largely male and aged under 30 years, with the target crash problem including a high proportion of single-vehicle loss-of-control crashes. Tailored content was developed based on exemplary Australian and international curricula, behaviour change theory, and adult learning principles; including transitioning from training to coaching and from testing to competency-based assessment. The result is Victoria’s new Motorcycle Graduated Licensing System (M-GLS) education and assessment curriculum, comprising three stages: pre-learner (Motorcycle Permit Assessment), learner (Check Ride), and pre-licence (Motorcycle Licence Assessment). Subject to potential refinements and on-going evaluation, this work lays the foundation for establishing a best-practice approach to novice motorcyclist education for licensure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Driver/Rider Training)
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224 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Beginner Driver Education in Oregon
Safety 2017, 3(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety3010009 - 21 Feb 2017
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 6702
Abstract
Although driver education (DE) is widely accepted as an effective teen driver safety measure and widely available in the United States, Canada and elsewhere, evaluations have generally failed to show that such formal programs actually produce safer drivers. To address the issue of [...] Read more.
Although driver education (DE) is widely accepted as an effective teen driver safety measure and widely available in the United States, Canada and elsewhere, evaluations have generally failed to show that such formal programs actually produce safer drivers. To address the issue of safety effects as part of a larger investigation, two studies were conducted to examine whether the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT)-approved DE program was associated with reductions in collisions and convictions. In the first study, DE status among a relatively small sample of teens who completed an online survey was not found to have a significant effect on collisions and convictions. In the second study, of a much larger population of teen drivers, DE status was associated with a lower incidence of collisions and convictions. On balance, this suggests that the safety effects of DE are either neutral, based on the results of the first Oregon study, or cautiously optimistic based on the results of the second study. The implications of these findings are discussed in terms of making improvements in DE that are evidence-based, and the need for further evaluation to establish that improved and new programs meet their safety objectives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Driver/Rider Training)
538 KiB  
Article
Factors Influencing Learner Permit Duration
Safety 2017, 3(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety3010002 - 22 Dec 2016
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3886
Abstract
An increasing number of countries are requiring an extended learner permit prior to independent driving. The question of when drivers begin the learner permit period, and how long they hold the permit before advancing to independent licensure has received little research attention. Licensure [...] Read more.
An increasing number of countries are requiring an extended learner permit prior to independent driving. The question of when drivers begin the learner permit period, and how long they hold the permit before advancing to independent licensure has received little research attention. Licensure timing is likely to be related to “push” and “pull” factors which may encourage or inhibit the process. To examine this question, we recruited a sample of 90 novice drivers (49 females and 41 males, average age of 15.6 years) soon after they obtained a learner permit and instrumented their vehicles to collect a range of driving data. Participants completed a series of surveys at recruitment related to factors that may influence licensure timing. Two distinct findings emerged from the time-to-event analysis that tested these push and pull factors in relation to licensure timing. The first can be conceptualized as teens’ motivation to drive (push), reflected in a younger age when obtaining a learner permit and extensive pre-permit driving experience. The second finding was teens’ perceptions of their parents’ knowledge of their activities (pull); a proxy for a parents’ attentiveness to their teens’ lives. Teens who reported higher levels of their parents’ knowledge of their activities took longer to advance to independent driving. These findings suggest time-to-licensure may be related to teens’ internal motivation to drive, and the ability of parents to facilitate or impede early licensure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Driver/Rider Training)
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2520 KiB  
Article
Exploring the Use of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for Reducing Rider Stress and Stress-Related Anxiety, Anger, and Worry
Safety 2016, 2(4), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety2040022 - 20 Oct 2016
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 6865
Abstract
Stress can have serious implications on road safety and evidence suggests that it could lead to increases in driving errors, lapses, and even crashes. Motorcyclists are a vulnerable road user group, and lapses in attention and risky behaviours resulting from stress could increase [...] Read more.
Stress can have serious implications on road safety and evidence suggests that it could lead to increases in driving errors, lapses, and even crashes. Motorcyclists are a vulnerable road user group, and lapses in attention and risky behaviours resulting from stress could increase the risk of collision. However, few safety interventions for reducing stress have been developed and evaluated, especially in motorcyclists. The purpose of this research was to develop and pilot a Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) course for the treatment of rider stress. Five motorcyclists experiencing a range of life and work stressors completed the CBT course between January and March 2015. Findings from the Driver Stress Inventory and Driver Behaviour Questionnaire showed positive trends in the overall reduction of rider stress traits, such as aggression, thrill seeking, and dislike of riding. Qualitative data showed that participants engaged well with the intervention and believed it had aided them in their riding-related stress. Although these results are promising, the results warrant further investigation in order to validate CBT as a viable means of reducing the collision risk both for this already vulnerable road user group and other driver categories. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Driver/Rider Training)
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400 KiB  
Commentary
Learning to Drive Safely: Reasonable Expectations and Future Directions for the Learner Period
Safety 2016, 2(4), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety2040020 - 19 Oct 2016
Cited by 46 | Viewed by 6479
Abstract
The young driver problem is typified by high crash rates early in licensure that decline with experience, but are higher initially and decline more slowly for the youngest novices. Despite considerable effort, only Graduated Driver Licensing System (GDLS) policies have been shown to [...] Read more.
The young driver problem is typified by high crash rates early in licensure that decline with experience, but are higher initially and decline more slowly for the youngest novices. Despite considerable effort, only Graduated Driver Licensing System (GDLS) policies have been shown to improve novice young driver safety outcomes. Unfortunately, GDLS policies are mostly limited to countries with a relatively young licensure age. Meanwhile, it is not entirely clear how GDLS and other young driver transportation safety efforts, including driver training and testing, supervised practice and parental management of young drivers, can best be configured. Notably, professional training can foster improvements in vehicle management skills that are necessary, but do not assure safe driving behavior. Substantial recent research has focused on training methods to improve driving skills, but the safety benefits of driver training have not been established. While prolonged practice driving increases experience and provides supervisors with opportunities to prepare novices for independent driving, the transition to independent driving challenges novices to employ, on their own, poorly-mastered skills under unfamiliar and complex driving conditions. Licensing policies and parental management practices can limit the complexity of driving conditions while novices gain needed driving experience. Nevertheless, an emerging body of literature suggests that future advances in training and supervision of novice teenage drivers might best focus on the translation of learning to independent driving by fostering safe driving attitudes and norms, judgment, dedicated attention to driving tasks and self-control at the wheel. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Driver/Rider Training)
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