Transportation System Design

A special issue of Safety (ISSN 2313-576X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2023) | Viewed by 16513

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, University of Thessaly, Pedion Areos, 38384 Volos, Greece
Interests: roadway safety; transportation planning design; evaluation of transportation systems
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advances in the transportation sector through the application of intelligent transportation systems (ITS) and the incorporation of leading-edge information and communication technologies (ICT) in traffic operations and management have led to new ways of improving the safety, efficiency, and sustainability of the transportation system.

New mobility systems have emerged, aiming to react to travelers’ requests and provide high-quality service. Mobility as a service, vehicle sharing, and ride hailing are representative examples. Collaborative schemes connect freight transportation players into a common and optimized operation. Synergies have developed between people and goods transportation systems. The sharing of infrastructure and transportation capacity is expected to reduce traffic throughput and its impact on congestion, economy, environment, and safety. Automation is taking over from human intervention and connected systems result in flawless performance adjusted to the travel demand in real-time. Rich ubiquitous data are becoming available from a variety of sources, ranging from monitoring equipment to onboard units and from sensors to smart device applications. Their analysis is a strong tool for predicting, reacting, and responding to any incidents requiring assistance.

This Special Issue focuses on the latest research conducted in the field of transportation system design, taking into account the new trends in the domain. The issue will present findings on the role of revolutionary transportation paradigms and highlight validated assessments of their impact on safety. It covers topics on all transportation modes, related to smart infrastructure, automated vehicles, and shared transportation. Both original research and review papers are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Eftihia Nathanail
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Safety is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • Accident prediction
  • Accident prevention
  • System readiness and response
  • Safety assessment
  • System security
  • Human factors, user behavior, and user acceptance
  • Education, training, licensing

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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27 pages, 19280 KiB  
Article
Dilemma Zone: Modeling Drivers’ Decision at Signalized Intersections against Aggressiveness and Other Factors Using UAV Technology
by Panagiotis Papaioannou, Efthymis Papadopoulos, Anastasia Nikolaidou, Ioannis Politis, Socrates Basbas and Eleni Kountouri
Safety 2021, 7(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety7010011 - 3 Feb 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 8278
Abstract
Intersection safety and drivers’ behavior are strongly interrelated, especially when the latter are located in dilemma zone. This paper explores, among others, the main factors affecting driver behavior, such as distance to stop line, approaching speed and acceleration/deceleration, and two additional factors, namely, [...] Read more.
Intersection safety and drivers’ behavior are strongly interrelated, especially when the latter are located in dilemma zone. This paper explores, among others, the main factors affecting driver behavior, such as distance to stop line, approaching speed and acceleration/deceleration, and two additional factors, namely, driver’s aggressiveness and driver’s relative position at the onset of the yellow signal. Field data were collected using unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology. Two binary choice models were developed, the first relying on observed data and the latter enriched by the latent factor drivers’ aggressiveness and the vehicles’ relative position. Drivers were classified to aggressive and non-aggressive ones using a latent class model that combined approaching speed and acceleration/deceleration data. Drivers were further grouped according to their expected reaction/decision to stop or cross the intersection in relation to their relative position. Both models equally explain drivers’ decisions adequately, but the second one offers additional explanatory power attributed to aggressiveness. Being able to identify the level of aggressiveness among the drivers enables the calculation of the probability that drivers will cross the intersection even if caught in a dilemma zone or in a zone in which the obvious decision is to stop. Such findings can be valuable when designing a signalized intersection and the traffic time settings, as well as the posted speed limit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transportation System Design)
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Review

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18 pages, 18689 KiB  
Review
A Review of Vehicle-to-Vulnerable Road User Collisions on Limited-Access Highways to Support the Development of Automated Vehicle Safety Assessments
by Husam Muslim and Jacobo Antona-Makoshi
Safety 2022, 8(2), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety8020026 - 6 Apr 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 4319
Abstract
This study aims to provide evidence to support the development of automated vehicle (AV) safety assessments that consider the possible presence of non-motorized vulnerable road-users (VRUs) on limited-access highways. Although limited-access highways are designed to accommodate high-speed motor vehicles, collisions involving VRUs on [...] Read more.
This study aims to provide evidence to support the development of automated vehicle (AV) safety assessments that consider the possible presence of non-motorized vulnerable road-users (VRUs) on limited-access highways. Although limited-access highways are designed to accommodate high-speed motor vehicles, collisions involving VRUs on such roadways are frequently reported. A narrative review is conducted, covering the epidemiology of VRUs crashes on limited-access highways to identify typical crash patterns considering collisions severity and the underlying reasons for the VRUs to use the highway. The review results show that occupants alighting from a disabled or crashed vehicle, people seeking help or helping others, highway maintenance zones, police stops, and people crossing a highway should be given priority to ensure VRU safety on limited-access highways. The results are summarized in figures with schematic models to generate test scenarios for AV safety assessment. Additionally, the results are discussed using two examples of traffic situations relevant to the potential AV-VRU crashes on highways and the current performance of autonomous emergency braking and autonomous emergency steering systems. These findings have important implications for producing scenarios in which AV may not produce crashes lest it performs worse than human drivers in the proposed scenarios. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transportation System Design)
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