Climate Risk: Measuring, Modelling and Marketing

A special issue of Risks (ISSN 2227-9091).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2016) | Viewed by 4790

Special Issue Editors

Chair for Energy Trading and Finance, University Duisburg-Essen, Universitätsstraße 12, 45141 Essen, Germany
Interests: energy derivatives; quantitative climate finance; financial risk management; financial derivatives
Mr. Sascha Kollenberg
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Chair for Energy Trading and Finance, University Duisburg-Essen, Universitätsstraße 12, 45141 Essen, Germany

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The effects of climate change on the world economy have become a major political and economic concern, both in the academic and corporate spheres. Its immense effects on the micro- and macroeconomic scale, and from the production level to the end consumer, took hold and their scope of impact continues to grow. Simultaneously, new regulations are emerging around the globe that aim at reducing emissions and spur low carbon investment.

As a result of these developments, risks attached to the direct physical impact of climate change, as well as regulatory risks are becoming an increasing concern for academics and practitioners alike.

The emerging fields of Climate Economics and Climate Finance aim at addressing these concerns, both by integrating climate risks within traditional frameworks and by developing new ideas and techniques to assess and protect against its impact. Deriving implications for practitioners in finance and industry, as well as for policy makers, is of growing importance. However, as a relatively young and burgeoning field and due to its inter-disciplinary nature, fundamental research is highly valuable and indispensable.

The aim of this special issue is to highlight outstanding contributions, the topics of which can be related to, but need not be limited to the quantitative assessment of

  • direct physical risk due to climate change (declining crop yields, extreme weather events,rising sea levels etc.);
  • risks associated to health care, epidemics and humanitarian crises;
  • regulatory risks (potential taxes, emissions trading schemes, discretionary interventions etc.);
  • risks associated to reputation and public relations.

Furthermore, a special invitation is extended towards contributions related to problems of adapting to climate risks in capital management, such as:

  • portfolio management facing new technologies and stranding risks of conventional assets and
  • newly emerging derivative markets related to the capitalisation of climate risks.

Similarly, contributions to the economic literature on robust and/or resilient climate policy instruments are especially called for.

Prof. Dr. Rüdiger Kiesel
Sascha Kollenberg
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Risks is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Climate Risk
  • Regulatory Risk
  • Green Finance
  • Climate Robust Policies

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

3519 KiB  
Article
Using Climate and Weather Data to Support Regional Vulnerability Screening Assessments of Transportation Infrastructure
Risks 2016, 4(3), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/risks4030028 - 03 Aug 2016
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4505
Abstract
Extreme weather and climate change can have a significant impact on all types of infrastructure and assets, regardless of location, with the potential for human casualties, physical damage to assets, disruption of operations, economic and community distress, and environmental degradation. This paper describes [...] Read more.
Extreme weather and climate change can have a significant impact on all types of infrastructure and assets, regardless of location, with the potential for human casualties, physical damage to assets, disruption of operations, economic and community distress, and environmental degradation. This paper describes a methodology for using extreme weather and climate data to identify climate-related risks and to quantify the potential impact of extreme weather events on certain types of transportation infrastructure as part of a vulnerability screening assessment. This screening assessment can be especially useful when a large number of assets or large geographical areas are being studied, with the results enabling planners and asset managers to undertake a more detailed assessment of vulnerability on a more targeted number of assets or locations. The methodology combines climate, weather, and impact data to identify vulnerabilities to a range of weather and climate related risks over a multi-decadal planning period. The paper applies the methodology to perform an extreme weather and climate change vulnerability screening assessment on transportation infrastructure assets for the State of Tennessee. This paper represents the results of one of the first efforts at spatial vulnerability assessments of transportation infrastructure and provides important insights for any organization considering the impact of climate and weather events on transportation or other critical infrastructure systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Risk: Measuring, Modelling and Marketing)
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