Clinical Research on Oral Diseases

A special issue of Reports (ISSN 2571-841X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 13429

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Throughout the decades, clinical research in the field of oral diseases has remained fundamental for the proper identification of pathologies occurring in the head and neck and, subsequently, for the choice of the most appropriate therapy. It still remains the main focus of advanced studies today. Also, the correct dental/prosthetic rehabilitation of such patients requires extensive knowledge of these diseases to provide the patients with appropriate treatment.

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide a platform for clinicians who want to report on a single case or case series, as well on clinical research studies or review studies in the wide topic of oral diseases including the various techniques for the proper rehabilitation (both functional and aesthetic) of such patients.

Dr. Saverio Capodiferro
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Keywords

  • oral diseases
  • head and neck diseases
  • dental rehabilitation
  • oral cavity

Published Papers (7 papers)

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12 pages, 3437 KiB  
Article
Comparison of the Haas Expander and the Elastodontic Device for the Resolution of Transverse Discrepancies in Growing Patients: A Single-Centre Observational Study
by Eleonora Ortu, Sara Di Nicolantonio, Samuele Cova, Davide Pietropaoli, Lucia De Simone and Annalisa Monaco
Reports 2024, 7(2), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/reports7020041 - 21 May 2024
Viewed by 359
Abstract
Background: This study aimed to compare the clinical outcomes of using two different devices to treat upper palatal discrepancies evaluated with a digital intraoral scanner. Methods: A total of 64 patients were enrolled and treated with either an elastodontic expansion device (32 patient [...] Read more.
Background: This study aimed to compare the clinical outcomes of using two different devices to treat upper palatal discrepancies evaluated with a digital intraoral scanner. Methods: A total of 64 patients were enrolled and treated with either an elastodontic expansion device (32 patient test group, 16 females and 16 males, mean age 7.08 ± 0.44) or Haas expander (32 patient control group, 16 females and 16 males, mean age 7.32 ± 0.50). The two groups exhibited similar orthodontic features. The orthodontic criteria were: skeletal class I relationship; molar class I relationship; complete eruption of upper sixths; presence of unilateral or bilateral cross bite. All dental casts were examined and subsequently scanned with an intraoral scanner (I-Tero) pre-treatment (T0) and 12 months after the onset of therapy (T1) to assess the distance between the decidous upper canines (ICW, intercanine width) and the distance between the mesiopalatal cusps of the upper first molars (IMW, intermolar width). For statistical analysis, the t-test for continous variables and the chi-square test for categorical variables were used, respectively. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the mean and SD of the expansions that resulted from the Haas expander and the elastodontic devices (Haas expander vs. Eptamed: ICW_T1 (Haas) = 42.34 (3.09), ICW_T1 (Eptamed) = 42.69 (2.77); p = 0.743; IMW_T1 (Haas) = 34.22 (2.29), IMW_T1 (Eptamed) = 34.00 (2.56); p = 0.800). The two devices were similarly effective. Conclusions: Elastodontic devices and the Haas expander can successfully help the orthodontist to conduct upper arch expansion treatment. However, elastodontic devices are more comfortable during the resolution of palatal discrepancies compared to palatal expander devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Research on Oral Diseases)
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6 pages, 2673 KiB  
Case Report
Endoscopic Surgical Approach for a Mesiodens in the Nasal Cavity: A Rare Phenomenon
by Enzo Iacomino, Chiara Fratini, Federica Zoccali, Francesca Cambria, Matteo Laudani, Alberto Eibenstein, Christian Barbato, Marco de Vincentiis and Antonio Minni
Reports 2024, 7(2), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/reports7020046 - 13 Jun 2024
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Abstract
The nasal cavity is a sporadic site for mesiodens, and if it is impacted in the lower nasal floor or localized in the nasal septum, it may cause various nasal symptoms such as nasal obstruction, recurrent rhinitis, and epistaxis. Early diagnosis is made [...] Read more.
The nasal cavity is a sporadic site for mesiodens, and if it is impacted in the lower nasal floor or localized in the nasal septum, it may cause various nasal symptoms such as nasal obstruction, recurrent rhinitis, and epistaxis. Early diagnosis is made through clinical findings and a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan, but a definite treatment plan has not yet been developed. This study aims to present a case of a mesiodens in a 27-year-old male, located in the nasal septum, an unusual and rare site, and its surgical removal using an endoscopic nasal approach with subperiosteal intranasal dissection. The result of the study appears significant because this technique led to fewer postoperative complications, and it appears to be safer and more effective than the traditional palatal or transoral approach. Moreover, the nasal endoscopic approach is more natural to the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) surgeons than the transoral approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Research on Oral Diseases)
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12 pages, 5608 KiB  
Case Report
Leukocyte-Platelet-Rich Fibrin in Bone Regeneration after Periapical Surgery: A 30-Month Follow-Up Clinical Report
by Hatim A. Qurban, Hatem Hazzaa Hamadallah, Mohammad A. Madkhaly, Muhannad M. Hakeem and Ahmed Yaseen Alqutaibi
Reports 2024, 7(2), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/reports7020032 - 26 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Aim and background: Periapical lesions, which occur due to the infection and necrosis of dental pulp, are a significant dental pathology that poses risks to oral and systemic health. These lesions often require interventions such as root canal treatment or periapical surgery. Recent [...] Read more.
Aim and background: Periapical lesions, which occur due to the infection and necrosis of dental pulp, are a significant dental pathology that poses risks to oral and systemic health. These lesions often require interventions such as root canal treatment or periapical surgery. Recent research has focused on the effectiveness of biocompatible materials, including mineral trioxide aggregate, bioceramics, and leukocyte-platelet-rich fibrin (L’PRF), in improving healing outcomes. This report presents the application of leukocyte-platelet-rich fibrin (L’PRF) derived from the patient’s autologous blood to enhance bone healing. Case description: A 61-year-old woman with well-controlled hypertension and good oral hygiene visited the dental clinic due to a painless swelling near her upper left central incisor. After examination, it was determined that she had a periapical granuloma. The patient underwent successful root canal retreatment and apical surgery, during which leukocyte-platelet-rich fibrin was applied. After 30 months, she experienced significant improvement with no symptoms and substantial bone regeneration. Conclusion: Clinical evidence and this case study indicate that leukocyte-platelet-rich fibrin (L’PRF) may enhance healing post periapical surgery. Further research, including more extensive and longer-term randomized trials, must confirm L’PRF’s effectiveness and refine treatment protocols. Clinical significance: L’PRF enhances bone healing post periapical surgery. Clinicians should consider integrating L’PRF in periapical surgeries, ensure diligent follow-up, and inform patients of its long-term advantages. Further randomized trials are needed to refine L’PRF clinical guidelines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Research on Oral Diseases)
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12 pages, 1966 KiB  
Case Report
Surgical Treatment of Multiple Bone Cysts Using a Platelet-Rich Fibrin and BoneAlbumin Composite Graft: A Case Report
by Martin Major, Márton Kivovics, Bence Tamás Szabó, Tamás Déri, Melinda Polyák, Noémi Piroska Jákob, Dániel Csete, Attila Mócsai, Zsolt Németh and György Szabó
Reports 2024, 7(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/reports7010007 - 22 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Promising research results have been obtained on the tissue-regeneration properties of PRF (platelet-rich fibrin) in dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. PRF presumably promotes healing and accelerates ossification. In this case report, the patient had a history of Gorlin–Goltz syndrome, also called nevoid basal cell [...] Read more.
Promising research results have been obtained on the tissue-regeneration properties of PRF (platelet-rich fibrin) in dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. PRF presumably promotes healing and accelerates ossification. In this case report, the patient had a history of Gorlin–Goltz syndrome, also called nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, an autosomal dominant neurocutaneous disease that was known for many years. As a consequence, cysts were detected in both the mandible and maxilla. We performed decompression on this 37-year-old patient, followed by a cystectomy on an extensive lesion in the right angle of the mandible. One cyst from each side of the body mandible and one from the maxilla were completely enucleated, as determined using an intraoral exploration. The resulting bone defect was filled with a composite graft composed of a mixture of A-PRF and a serum albumin-coated bone allograft (BoneAlbumin). The wound was then covered with a PRF membrane. The surgical sites were closed per primam. The postoperative period was uneventful. Biopsies were performed after three and six months of healing for histological micromorphometry analyses. Dental implants were placed at the sampling site. Three months after the implantation, the ossified implants were fitted with superstructures. To date, no complications have appeared with the bone augmentation. The authors interpret from the findings that the combination of A-PRF and BoneAlbumin can be validated as a prosperous bone substitute. It can be safely implanted after a 3-month ossification period. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Research on Oral Diseases)
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8 pages, 6872 KiB  
Case Report
Hyoid Bone Metastases: An Unusual Case
by Gian Piero Di Marco, Cinzia Tucci, Enzo Iacomino, Vincenzo Corridore, Maria Lauriello, Alessandra Fioretti and Alberto Eibenstein
Reports 2023, 6(4), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/reports6040059 - 8 Dec 2023
Viewed by 2031
Abstract
(1) Background: Secondary tumors of the hyoid bone are extremely rare in clinics. In the literature, there is only one study about hyoid bone metastases from sigmoid adenocarcinoma. (2) Methods: We report a case of hyoid bone metastases in a 78-year-old patient treated [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Secondary tumors of the hyoid bone are extremely rare in clinics. In the literature, there is only one study about hyoid bone metastases from sigmoid adenocarcinoma. (2) Methods: We report a case of hyoid bone metastases in a 78-year-old patient treated for rectum and sigmoid colon adenocarcinoma. (3) Results: A mass excision surgery of a rounded osteolytic mass of 4.5 × 3.6 cm in size in the central part of the hyoid bone was performed under general anesthesia, according to the multidisciplinary tumor board recommendation. (4) Conclusions: Hyoid bone metastases can occur in the rectum and sigmoid colon adenocarcinoma. A total body bone scintigraphy and CT examination are suggested to detect silent bone metastases in patients with a history of cancer and neck masses. The prognosis is good, but a regular follow-up is recommended. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Research on Oral Diseases)
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18 pages, 9092 KiB  
Case Report
Digital Workflow in Full Mouth Rehabilitation with Immediate Loading, Intraoral Welding and 3D-Printed Reconstructions in a Periodontal Patient: A Case Report
by Adam Nowicki and Karolina Osypko
Reports 2023, 6(4), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/reports6040052 - 1 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1909
Abstract
Background: Complex implant reconstructions in patients with residual dentition due to periodontitis is a challenging task in many aspects. Methods: This study shows a full digital workflow combining 3D printing, guided implant placement, intraoral scanning and welding with immediate loading and digital smile [...] Read more.
Background: Complex implant reconstructions in patients with residual dentition due to periodontitis is a challenging task in many aspects. Methods: This study shows a full digital workflow combining 3D printing, guided implant placement, intraoral scanning and welding with immediate loading and digital smile design. An analog impression was taken to validate the passive fit of final restorations. The whole treatment plan was divided into three stages. The first stage included an intraoral scan of baseline dentition, and then the extraction of all teeth was performed, implanting four temporary implants and providing the patient with removable temporary prosthesis. The second stage was to scan the removable temporaries, implanting 10 implants and multi-unit abutments (MUA), and create a rigid construction via the intraoral welding of titanium bar and by fixing it to the 3D-printed temporary reconstructions (designed with DSD) as a form of immediate loading. The third stage included the scanning of screw-retained temporary reconstructions, then scanning from the MUA level and creating final reconstruction. Results: The presented workflow enabled the delivery of some sort of restoration to the patient at every moment of the treatment and to sustain the required esthetic effect with decent comfort of use even in the early stages. Conclusions: A full digital workflow is a reliable treatment method even in complex cases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Research on Oral Diseases)
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7 pages, 943 KiB  
Case Report
Facial Nerve Palsy after Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block: A Rare Presentation of Ocular Complication and Literature Review
by Glauco Chisci, Dafne Chisci, Enea Chisci, Viola Chisci and Elettra Chisci
Reports 2023, 6(4), 47; https://doi.org/10.3390/reports6040047 - 4 Oct 2023
Viewed by 5915
Abstract
Many ocular complications are described in the literature after dental injections. Facial nerve palsy is a rare complication. We report a case of a 60-year-old woman in the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I classification under orthodontic treatment with aligners that required an [...] Read more.
Many ocular complications are described in the literature after dental injections. Facial nerve palsy is a rare complication. We report a case of a 60-year-old woman in the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I classification under orthodontic treatment with aligners that required an inferior alveolar block for endodontic treatment. Optocaine with epinephrine 1:200,000 and a disposable needle 25 G × 36 mm mounted on a dental syringe were used, and the effect of the anesthesia arose after 10 min. Facial nerve palsy on the side of the injection arose after 1 h and 40 min from the injection, and the patient was immediately visited by an ophthalmologist who reported the examination reported in the present case report. The authors report this unusual case with a subsequent onset and short duration of facial nerve palsy and discuss possible anesthetic solution pathways. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Research on Oral Diseases)
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