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New Perspectives in Natural Hazards Remote Sensing

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Remote Sensing in Geology, Geomorphology and Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2024 | Viewed by 1191

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Engineering, College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran
Interests: landslide modeling; natural and man-made hazards; spatial modeling in GIS and R; machine learning techniques; multi-hazard modeling; remote sensing applications
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Engineering, College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran
Interests: soil erosion; soil geomorphology; susceptibility; remote sensing

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Guest Editor
Department of Water Engineering and Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Center, College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran
Interests: land surface temperature; split window; air temperature; remote sensing

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Guest Editor
Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Engineering, College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71441-65186, Iran
Interests: landslides; debris flow; susceptibility; remote sensing

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Natural Resources and Environment, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran
Interests: desertification; soil erosion; land degradation; fluvial geomorphology; aeolian geomorphology

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Guest Editor
Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Helmholtz Institute Freiberg for Resource Technology, Chemnitzer Straße 40, 09599 Freiberg, Germany
Interests: hyperspectral imaging; mineral exploration; remote sensing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last decade, natural hazards such as tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, avalanches, cyclones or tornados, storm surges, flooding, landslides, soil erosion, land subsidence, wildfires, extreme temperatures, drought and so on have resulted in extensive loss to quality of life, critical infrastructure and economy, universally. With the underestimation of these large-scale activities, the real growth of the human population, climate change and changes to the natural landscape, the intensity and frequency of extreme natural hazards and their consequent effects are expected to enhance soon.

Technological interposition prepares crucial provisions for the prohibition and prediction of natural events. Remote sensing is among the widely used technologies that have transformed our finding of natural events, including the vast range of land processes operating on the Earth. The data created using advanced geospatial technologies named “remote sensing systems” with different spectral, temporal and spatial resolutions specially prepare prospects for varied knowledge on spatiotemporal patterns, forecasting and sustainable development goals of natural events. The collection of datasets applying earth observation systems has been worthwhile for assessing the adverse impacts of natural events, particularly with their near surface (UAVs) or near real-time potentiality for tracing extreme natural hazards. Additionally, remote sensing systems from various platforms such as the Google Earth Engine are considered as some of the main decision-making tools for making loss and damage estimations and modeling approaches for the early warning systems network. Further, advanced applications of geoinformation-based techniques such as remote sensing early warning in estimating different dimensions of natural hazards can be considered as new perspectives in natural hazards remote sensing and easily facilitate data access for modeling and monitoring natural hazards, hazard assessments and risk mapping.

Prof. Dr. Hamid Reza Pourghasemi
Dr. Narges Kariminejad
Dr. Foroogh Golkar
Dr. Soheila Pouyan
Prof. Dr. Adel Sepehr
Dr. Richard Gloaguen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Google Earth Engine
  • unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)
  • machine learning/data mining
  • remote sensing
  • GIS
  • multi-hazard
  • spatial modeling

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

20 pages, 8514 KiB  
Article
Adequacy Analysis Using UAV of Heavy Rainfall Disaster Reduction Facilities According to Urban Development in Republic of Korea
by Youngseok Song, Moojong Park and Jingul Joo
Remote Sens. 2023, 15(23), 5518; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs15235518 - 27 Nov 2023
Viewed by 513
Abstract
Urban development is a project that enhances human life, but its hydrological impact increases runoff by expanding impervious areas. Furthermore, localized and intense rainfall resulting from the effects of climate change is exacerbating damage to urban areas. The Republic of Korea has established [...] Read more.
Urban development is a project that enhances human life, but its hydrological impact increases runoff by expanding impervious areas. Furthermore, localized and intense rainfall resulting from the effects of climate change is exacerbating damage to urban areas. The Republic of Korea has established detention ponds as reduction facilities for heavy rainfall disasters, and the law stipulates that the impact of disasters that increase due to the development projects will remain unchanged from before. However, ensuring precision in millimeter or centimeter units during the design of reduction facilities is challenging. In this study, our aim is to assess the suitability of using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for the detention pond, a facility that reduces runoff resulting from urban development. The target area is a detention pond located in Innovation City, Ulsan Metropolitan City, Republic of Korea. We compared and analyzed design drawings and topographical data. The increased runoff due to the development project was 0.59 m3/s, and the effectiveness of disaster reduction was evaluated by the installation of a detention pond. The detention pond’s reduction effect was analyzed to be 1.16 m3/s for the design drawing and 1.57 m3/s for the topographical analysis. The detention pond currently in place in the target area was found to provide additional disaster reduction benefits compared to the original design plan. The findings of this study can be utilized in relevant laws and guidelines as a method to evaluate the suitability of future reduction facilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Perspectives in Natural Hazards Remote Sensing)
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