Intercultural Education and Religions

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2020) | Viewed by 11955

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Research Methods and Diagnosis in Education, University of Granada, 52005 Melilla, Spain
Interests: intercultural education; cyberbullying; racism; xenophobia; digital media at school; immigrant students; personal learning environments; social skills
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Intercultural education is essential to improve the cultural and religious integration of students.

In this sense, inclusive intercultural education takes special relevance, allowing students of different cultures, ethnicities, and religions to perceive the equality that exists in the classroom and adopt an attitude of cooperation and exchange for cultural enrichment and mutual education (Diez et al., 2012). Therefore, inclusive educational practice is considered fundamental for the development of students’ rights and is assumed as a primary precedent in the creation of fairer societies (Grande & González, 2015).

In situations of inequality due to religious reasons, intercultural education focused on the transmission of democratic values (Bergmark & Westman, 2016) is particularly important, being these moral values centered on the commitment to others and to the surrounding world (Higham & Djohari, 2018) and closely related to Human Rights (Cohen, 2004; Gundelach, 2007; Rawls 2001). The relationship between democratic values and religious diversity is based on the respect of the freedom of any confession, as well as of equality, freedom of expression, and minority rights in majority governments (Lester, 2011).

This Special Issue is proposed in order to collect research that shows the current state of educational and intercultural inclusion of students of different religions. It will increase the existing knowledge about the topic already showing that intercultural education promotes a decrease in extremist positions towards certain religious or cultural beliefs (Meeus, 2015; Miklikowska & Hurme, 2011), as well as intercultural societies that are based on the interactions between diverse people in a peaceful way (Adamczyk & Pitt, 2009).

Prof. Dr. María Tomé-Fernández
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • intercultural education
  • religions
  • multicultural relations
  • globalization
  • immigration

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 649 KiB  
Article
Knowledge and Learning of Interreligious and Intercultural Understanding in an Indonesian Islamic College Sample: An Epistemological Belief Approach
by M. Nur Ghufron, Rini Risnawita Suminta and Jamaludin Hadi Kusuma
Religions 2020, 11(8), 411; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11080411 - 10 Aug 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3828
Abstract
Epistemological beliefs are the basis of how someone acquires knowledge and are used as a guide for behavior in everyday life. For religious fundamentalists, however, their belief in religious knowledge is very strong, causing them to negate different opinions and ideas. Since the [...] Read more.
Epistemological beliefs are the basis of how someone acquires knowledge and are used as a guide for behavior in everyday life. For religious fundamentalists, however, their belief in religious knowledge is very strong, causing them to negate different opinions and ideas. Since the radicalization process is closely related to the education process, two important epistemological concepts of belief about knowledge and belief about learning need to be tested to analyze the extent to which these two factors might be predictors of an individual’s tendency towards religious fundamentalism. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of epistemological beliefs on the religious fundamentalism of Muslim millennial youth. By using a simple random sampling method, data collection was conducted by distributing Likert-scale questionnaires to 195 Muslim undergraduate students at an Islamic institute in Kudus, Central Java. Data were analyzed using structural equation modelling (SEM). The results showed that the proposed model was appropriate and eligible for hypothesis testing (p = 138, goodness of fit index (GFI) = 0.965, adjusted goodness of fit index (AGFI) = 0.934, Tucker–Lewis index (TLI) = 0.978 and root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) = 0.040). Furthermore, statistical analysis shows that epistemological beliefs in the form of beliefs about knowledge (critical ratio (C.R) = 4585 and p = 0.000) and beliefs about learning (C.R = 3202 and p = 0.001) have significant and positive effects on religious fundamentalism. These results highlight the importance of developing the concept of critical thinking in learning and inclusiveness-oriented education to eradicate religious fundamentalism among millennials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intercultural Education and Religions)
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19 pages, 327 KiB  
Article
Intercultural Sensitivity and Ethnocentrism Levels of Theology Students in a Turkish University Sample
by Irfan Erdogan and Muhiddin Okumuslar
Religions 2020, 11(5), 237; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11050237 - 12 May 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3561
Abstract
In this study, we aimed to examine the intercultural sensitivity levels and ethnocentrism levels, as well as some variables that affect them, of students studying in the Necmettin Erbakan University Theology Faculty in Turkey. A descriptive survey research method was adopted to realize [...] Read more.
In this study, we aimed to examine the intercultural sensitivity levels and ethnocentrism levels, as well as some variables that affect them, of students studying in the Necmettin Erbakan University Theology Faculty in Turkey. A descriptive survey research method was adopted to realize this aim. The Intercultural Sensitivity Scale and the Generalized Ethnocentrism Scale were used as the data collection tools. The sample of the study consisted of 326 students studying in the Necmettin Erbakan University Faculty of Theology during the 2018–2019 academic year. According to our findings, the intercultural sensitivity level of the theology students was “high,” whereas their ethnocentrism level was “low.” The intercultural sensitivity levels of the theology students differed based on age and exposure to individuals from another country or culture. Ethnocentrism levels in the students differed based on gender, the nationality of the students (Europe, Turkey, Asia-Africa), the size of the settlement unit, and exposure to individuals from different countries or cultures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intercultural Education and Religions)
13 pages, 612 KiB  
Article
Educational Potentials of Flipped Learning in Intercultural Education as a Transversal Resource in Adolescents
by Arturo Fuentes Cabrera, María Elena Parra-González, Jesús López Belmonte and Adrián Segura-Robles
Religions 2020, 11(1), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11010053 - 20 Jan 2020
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 4061
Abstract
The evolution of technology in the educational field has resulted in the emergence of new ways of teaching and learning, adapted to the formative characteristics of a digital era. This is the case of Flipped Learning (FL), an innovative teaching methodology that uses [...] Read more.
The evolution of technology in the educational field has resulted in the emergence of new ways of teaching and learning, adapted to the formative characteristics of a digital era. This is the case of Flipped Learning (FL), an innovative teaching methodology that uses technology to carry out instructional action and change learning moments and spaces. The objective of this study is to verify the effectiveness of FL on a traditional methodology without the use of digital resources in teaching content related to intercultural education. A quantitative research method has been followed by an experimental design. Two study groups have been set up. With the control group a traditional training methodology has been used, and with the experimental group an innovative one, through FL. A total of 60 students of the 4th level of Secondary Education from an educational center in Ceuta (Spain) have participated. An ad hoc questionnaire derived from other validated instruments has been used for data collection. The findings show that the FL has achieved better results in the different dimensions analyzed. Therefore, it is concluded that the implementation of innovative training actions such as FL can obtain better results in academic indicators than a traditional methodology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intercultural Education and Religions)
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