Walking towards Unity: What Remains to Be Done, Reflection and Challenges. The 60th Anniversary of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2023) | Viewed by 3530

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
San Vicente Ferrer Faculty of Theology, Catholic University of Valencia, 46001 Valencia, Spain
Interests: Ecumenism; Contemporary Catholic and Protestant Theology; Phenomenology and Philosophy of religion

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The ecumenical journey has a marked trajectory that has advanced, sometimes at an undesirable pace, but in constant movement, for more than a century. The commitment to unity is lived out from the command of Jesus, a unity that is born and lived on the way, as in the disciples of Emáus. In today's ecumenical situation, it is important that Christians living in different communities move together towards unity and do together whatever it is possible to do together. This perspective is particularly close to the heart of Pope Francis, who expressed his ecumenical conviction with the succinct words: "Unity will not come as a miracle in the end". It is crucial that unity grows along the way and that being on the way means already putting unity into practice. What matters today is to intensify this perspective and, above all, to live it concretely. Be together on the way to ecumenical unity. Authentic ecumenism lives in mutual empathy with each other's lives, in joy and sorrow, as Paul conveys in the beautiful image: "If (one) part suffers, all the parts suffer with it; if one part is honoured, all the parts share in its joy. You are the body of Christ and each of its members is a part of it" (1 Cor 12,26-27).

On the 60th anniversary of the Second Vatican Council, we would like to continue our journey and, in the light of the Council documents, reflect on how and how far we have come on this ecumenical journey and what challenges lie ahead. In this reflection, which focuses on the reception of the Council, we will approach, through various articles, the model of communion and unity that emerges from the Council's constitutions, decrees and declarations and tthe ecumenical dimension of these documents, in order to see the repercussions they have had both in ecumenical dialogues and in the life of the Church.

We invite you to submit an article to this Special Issue which will address the ecumenical dimension of the Second Vatican Council.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Andrés Jaime Valencia Pérez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Ecumenism
  • unity
  • way
  • community
  • confessions

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

21 pages, 679 KiB  
Article
Sacramentality, a Necessary and Permanent Dimension of the Church and Its Implications for Ecumenical Dialogue
by Rafael Vázquez Jiménez
Religions 2024, 15(2), 245; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel15020245 - 18 Feb 2024
Viewed by 782
Abstract
On the 60th anniversary of the celebration of the Second Vatican Council, we would like to take up again a statement from the constitution Lumen gentium, which was a source of controversy from the moment it was proposed in the schema De Ecclesia [...] Read more.
On the 60th anniversary of the celebration of the Second Vatican Council, we would like to take up again a statement from the constitution Lumen gentium, which was a source of controversy from the moment it was proposed in the schema De Ecclesia during the Council: «The Church is in Christ, like a sacrament, a sign and instrument of intimate union with God and of the unity of the entire humankind» (Lumen gentium, 1). In this article, we want to take up the concept of the Church as a sacrament, which emerged from the conciliar constitution on the Church, as a first step, although the conception of the Church as a sacrament is found in ecclesiology before the Second Vatican Council. Second, we will focus on the reception of this concept and its development after the Council. We will conclude with a third part devoted to its implications for ecumenical dialogue and the difficulties and possibilities for convergence it offers, with particular reference to the document of the Faith and Order Commission: The Church towards a Common Vision (2013). Full article
16 pages, 293 KiB  
Article
Ecclesiological Insights into the Orthodox–Catholic Dialogue
by Dimitrios Keramidas
Religions 2024, 15(1), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel15010096 - 11 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1184
Abstract
The paper’s aim is to provide a synthetic and at the same time critical reading of the official theological dialogue, known as the “dialogue of truth”, between the Orthodox Church and the Catholic Church. The paper will cover the period from the dialogue’s [...] Read more.
The paper’s aim is to provide a synthetic and at the same time critical reading of the official theological dialogue, known as the “dialogue of truth”, between the Orthodox Church and the Catholic Church. The paper will cover the period from the dialogue’s preparation, also known as the “dialogue of charity”, to the present day. It will analyse the ecclesiological aspects of this dialogue, focusing on sacraments, church ministries, primacy, synodality, and other related issues such as “Uniatism”. The essay will provide an overall evaluation of the dialogue, examining its reception and the need for concrete criteria of unity. Also, the paper will highlight the synodal and sacramental roots of episcopacy and their significance for the unity of the Church. The article will present insights from leading theologians, such as Joseph Ratzinger and John Zizioulas, to better understand the meaning and functions of primacy in the universal Church. Full article
11 pages, 300 KiB  
Article
The Holy Spirit and Scripture: André Scrima’s Contribution to Vatican II’s Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation Dei Verbum
by Viorel Coman
Religions 2023, 14(12), 1454; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel14121454 - 23 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1135
Abstract
This article explores André Scrima’s contribution to the final version of Vatican II’s Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation Dei Verbum. In so doing, the article shows the way in which Bishop Neophytos Edelby’s speech in aula on 5 October 1964, which was [...] Read more.
This article explores André Scrima’s contribution to the final version of Vatican II’s Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation Dei Verbum. In so doing, the article shows the way in which Bishop Neophytos Edelby’s speech in aula on 5 October 1964, which was (co)authored by Scrima, led to changes in the draft of Dei Verbum Chapter III, §12. That being the case, the recovery of the pneumatological dimension of Christian exegesis by Dei Verbum III, §12 was largely the result of Scrima’s interventions in the conciliar debates during the third session of Vatican II. In addition, the article focuses on Scrima’s reflections on the final version of Dei Verbum in the years following the closure of Vatican II. Full article
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