Post-Holocaust Theologies of Jews and Judaism

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444). This special issue belongs to the section "Religions and Health/Psychology/Social Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2024 | Viewed by 1504

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Associate Professor of History, Department of General Education, College of Arts and Sciences, Regent University, Virginia Beach, VA 23464, USA
Interests: modern German history; the history of Christianity; the history of Jewish-Christian relations; modern historical theology; film and history

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the decades following World War II and the Holocaust, Christians have begun the slow process of coming to terms with the history of antisemitism. Anti-Jewish tropes have been used to separate and denigrate Jews in European society and beyond. These tropes include the claim that the Jews killed Christ (the charge of deicide), that God has cursed and punished them for this crime ever since, that they are a sign of God’s justice in the world, that God has broken his covenant with them, and they are no longer the people of God.  

Vatican II’s Nostra Aetate reflected significant changes in the churches of the West, referring to Jews as “our elder brothers” and condemning antisemitism. How and why have the churches addressed anti-Jewish tropes since the Holocaust? How have the churches reformed their theologies of the Jews and Judaism? Moreover, how have these revisions impacted other aspects of the theology of the churches? At the same time, how have Jews and Jewish organizations responded to Christian revisions of their theology? 

This Special Issue is an opportunity to add to the ongoing conversation and growing scholarship on the Church coming to terms with its anti-Judaic traditions. Submissions from scholars of history, religion, theology, sociology, the arts and humanities, and other disciplines are welcome.  

We request that, prior to submitting a manuscript, interested authors initially submit a proposed title and an abstract of 400-600 words summarizing their intended contribution. Please send it to the guest editor (wskiles@regent.edu) or to the /Religions/ editorial office (religions@mdpi.com). The guest editors will review abstracts to ensure proper fit within the scope of the special issue. Full manuscripts will undergo double-blind peer review.

Dr. William Skiles
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • anti-Judaism
  • antisemitism
  • church history
  • Vatican II
  • inter-religious dialogue
  • Jewish–Christian relations

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 1374 KiB  
Article
Mapping the Jews in the Byzantine Hymnography: The Triodion
by Alexandru Ioniță
Religions 2024, 15(2), 237; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel15020237 - 16 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1188
Abstract
The Byzantine hymnography was considered a “stumbling stone” of the Jewish–Orthodox Christian dialogue because of the harsh anti-Jewish elements kept in the modern liturgical texts without any revision. This article analyses the often-mentioned texts of the Triodion—the liturgical period before Pascha—using a quantitative [...] Read more.
The Byzantine hymnography was considered a “stumbling stone” of the Jewish–Orthodox Christian dialogue because of the harsh anti-Jewish elements kept in the modern liturgical texts without any revision. This article analyses the often-mentioned texts of the Triodion—the liturgical period before Pascha—using a quantitative approach. The starting point of this research states that we must keep in mind the broader view on the state of the hymnography without labelling the entire Byzantine hymnography as anti-Jewish by looking at some concrete stanzas from Holy Week services. The results demonstrate that we can speak only about very few hymnographical texts containing anti-Jewish elements compared to the entire Triodion. This approach helps us in the Jewish–Christian debates to focus on what exactly are we speaking about, and what precisely those texts are saying. After a short analysis of the content of selected hymns, I propose three concrete categories of hymns that could be more easily approached by either excluding them or transforming them through translation into modern languages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Post-Holocaust Theologies of Jews and Judaism)
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