Child and Adolescent Spirituality/Religiosity and Religious Education

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444). This special issue belongs to the section "Religions and Health/Psychology/Social Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 5299

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Theology and Christian Education, Faculty of Education, Matej Bel University, 974 01 Banská Bystrica, Slovakia
Interests: New Testament studies; New Testament translation; Roma spirituality in the Central and Eastern Europe; religion and values

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue focuses on the description of concepts and the validation of new or already established questionnaires to measure specific aspects of spirituality/religiosity and related topics. Additionally, cultural adaptations and short-forms of such instruments are welcomed. Particularly welcome are their application in different cultural contexts. Spirituality/religiosity can be measured in a number of ways; it is a multidimensional phenomenon that can be perceived in a variety of ways and there are questions about the most effective form of measurement. Contemporary research is oriented to the area of religious education, value orientation, and spirituality. Religious, moral, and spiritual education has become an important issue in Europe, however, it is also addressed in other parts of the world, where the form of school teaching of the subject is being transformed. Religious educators of many spiritual traditions are seeking to communicate an understanding of faith in a pluralistic world. There is an urgent sense of need for the values of the human spirit. This is the context in which there is a world-wide revival of interest in spiritual, moral, and religious education.

Scholars from a wide range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences are invited to submit articles for the Special Issue addressing religiosity, spirituality, and culture in the lives of children and adolescents. This Special Issue aims to the research findings from the current research of the spirituality/religiosity with implications for religious behavior and education.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following: religiosity/spirituality in empirical research, causistics, and case studies; religious education in the specific cultural and societal context; comparative studies in the area of primary and secondary education, etc.

We request that, prior to submitting a manuscript, interested authors initially submit a proposed title and an abstract of 400–600 words summarizing their intended contribution. Please send it to the guest editors (viktoria.soltesova@umb.sk) or to Religions editorial office (religions@mdpi.com). Abstracts will be reviewed by the guest editors for the purposes of ensuring it properly fits within the scope of the Special Issue. Full manuscripts will undergo double-blind peer-review.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Viktória Šoltésová
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • spirituality
  • religiosity
  • religious education
  • children/adolescents
 

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 368 KiB  
Article
Religious Education as a Platform for Pupils’ Social Development and Prevention of Internet Addiction: The Case of Slovakia
by Miriam Niklová and Dana Hanesová
Religions 2024, 15(5), 585; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel15050585 - 9 May 2024
Viewed by 472
Abstract
The authors present changes in the content and teaching methods of religious education (RE) in the third decade of the 21st century, as proposed by the current curricular reform of compulsory education in Slovakia. First, they analyse the reform documents in terms of [...] Read more.
The authors present changes in the content and teaching methods of religious education (RE) in the third decade of the 21st century, as proposed by the current curricular reform of compulsory education in Slovakia. First, they analyse the reform documents in terms of social competence development as one of the RE content requirements. Second, they seek a teaching methodology that applies a balanced approach to the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) while protecting RE pupils and their building of healthy human relationships from the potential threat of digital addiction. The authors based their teaching ideas on the findings from their research. To explore the relationship between addictive Internet behaviour and social intelligence, they used a questionnaire including the Internet Addiction Test and the TSIS Scale. The Mann–Whitney U test was used for statistical analysis. Data on 386 adolescent respondents revealed a statistically significant difference between males and females in social awareness, with males performing significantly better. A weak positive relationship (ρ = 0.240) was identified between social awareness and addictive Internet behaviour. In the discussion, the authors suggest teaching methods for developing social competence via RE without resisting the opportunities provided by ICT, while also avoiding an increase in the risk of online social media addiction. They suggest that even denominational RE should prioritize cultivating healthy relationships not only with God but also relationships with other people, the outside world, and oneself. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child and Adolescent Spirituality/Religiosity and Religious Education)
13 pages, 225 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Online Theological Studies during the COVID-19 Period on Students’ Religiosity/Spirituality: A Qualitative Analysis
by Viktória Šoltésová and Marek Harastej
Religions 2024, 15(4), 500; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel15040500 - 18 Apr 2024
Viewed by 571
Abstract
Our study wants to clarify the structure of spirituality by applying existing multidimensional theories of religiosity and spirituality to in-depth interviews conducted among a sample of students. The current research analyzes 15 qualitative semi-structured interviews conducted among a sample of students at the [...] Read more.
Our study wants to clarify the structure of spirituality by applying existing multidimensional theories of religiosity and spirituality to in-depth interviews conducted among a sample of students. The current research analyzes 15 qualitative semi-structured interviews conducted among a sample of students at the Adventist Theological Institute in the Czech Republic and was conducted in May 2022. Since religiosity is a multidimensional phenomenon and we wished to investigate development in each dimension, we based our analyses on Glock and Stark’s model with four of their dimensions of religiosity: “belief”, “practice”, “experience”, and “knowledge”. Our study reflects on existing multidimensional religiosity/spirituality; six dimensions by Huber overlap with the religiosity/spirituality model we chose as the applied multidimensional model. As a result, based on the interviewees’ statements, we distinguished these dimensions in the context of specific conditions in the respondents’ individual personal experiences in the absence of personal group interaction. In our research, we ask the question: “What impact has the move of the entire formal and informal environment of an educational institution to an online environment had on the spirituality of each student?” An important finding is that the COVID-19 pandemic period brought about an exciting stimulus for spiritual support in theological education. The emergence of individual and independent religiosity/spirituality is a significant religious change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child and Adolescent Spirituality/Religiosity and Religious Education)
13 pages, 249 KiB  
Article
“Will I or Won’t I Be Sorry?”—Qualitative Research on Emotional Reactions of Secondary School Students in Poland after Resignation from Religion Lessons
by Radosław Rybarski, Helena Słotwińska, Marta Buk-Cegiełka and Janusz Mariański
Religions 2024, 15(4), 407; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel15040407 - 26 Mar 2024
Viewed by 544
Abstract
There is an empirical underestimation with regard to the study of the emotional states of young people. In Poland, an increasing number of secondary school students are deciding to stop attending their schools’ religious lessons. Of these, 57 students shared their experiences during [...] Read more.
There is an empirical underestimation with regard to the study of the emotional states of young people. In Poland, an increasing number of secondary school students are deciding to stop attending their schools’ religious lessons. Of these, 57 students shared their experiences during structured interviews that were subjected to interpretative phenomenological analysis. Before the young people taking part in the interview were asked about their emotional state, they were previously given the opportunity to express their attitudes towards their school’s religious lessons. The students had various emotional reactions after dropping out of their school’s religious lessons. In many cases, the students had difficulty noticing and naming their emotional states. These students were in the majority. Other students did specify their emotional states related to this decision. The analysis of these emotional reactions reveals students’ attitudes towards secondary-school religious lessons. The results of the study may prove to be an important voice for those responsible for the substantive design of religious lessons at schools. In addition, young people’s inability to name their emotions may prove to be an alarming fact for mental health professionals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child and Adolescent Spirituality/Religiosity and Religious Education)
10 pages, 289 KiB  
Article
Missionary’s Envision of Children in Late Qing China: Children’s Education and the Construction of Christian Discourse in Child’s Paper
by Ziqi Huang, Haixia Zhao and Fan Yang
Religions 2024, 15(2), 232; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel15020232 - 16 Feb 2024
Viewed by 703
Abstract
In the late Qing Dynasty, religious periodicals by Western missionaries were made legal in China, and subsequently became an important manner of their missionary cause. Among them, Child’s Paper 小孩月报 (1875–1881) by John Marshall Willoughby Farnham, a Protestant missionary from the United States, [...] Read more.
In the late Qing Dynasty, religious periodicals by Western missionaries were made legal in China, and subsequently became an important manner of their missionary cause. Among them, Child’s Paper 小孩月报 (1875–1881) by John Marshall Willoughby Farnham, a Protestant missionary from the United States, endeavoured to convert child readers by carrying children’s stories of moral and emotional education. By concentrating on the educational elements of Child’s Paper, this article inspects how conversion was achieved via the intertextual interpretation of Christian doctrines within these educational elements. Specifically, how the image of little Christians and urchins, respectively, represents salvation and redemption in Christian morals. This article holds that the missionaries’ stress on the authority of Christian discourse in the education of Chinese children makes evident an increasing emphasis on the reformative effects of Christianity on Chinese children. Moreover, the conversion-education efforts by missionaries also construed helping Chinese children gain a cross-cultural perspective on Western religion, and arguably inspired later Chinese intellectuals’ to create newspapers for the purpose of the pre-primary education of Chinese children. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child and Adolescent Spirituality/Religiosity and Religious Education)
13 pages, 849 KiB  
Article
Do Catholic Religious Practices Attenuate the Deconversion of Emerging Adults in Poland? The Mediating Role of Transcendent Indebtedness
by Dariusz Krok, Adam Falewicz and Małgorzata Szcześniak
Religions 2024, 15(1), 85; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel15010085 - 10 Jan 2024
Viewed by 888
Abstract
Emerging adulthood is a time of strong religious change that often leads to deconversion, understood as the abandonment of faith. In the present study, we aimed to verify the role of Catholic religious practices in the deconversion process and the mediating nature of [...] Read more.
Emerging adulthood is a time of strong religious change that often leads to deconversion, understood as the abandonment of faith. In the present study, we aimed to verify the role of Catholic religious practices in the deconversion process and the mediating nature of transcendent indebtedness in emerging adults from Poland. In this study, we used the Catholic Religious Practices Questionnaire (CRPQ), the Transcendent Indebtedness to God scale (T-ITG), and the Adolescents’ Deconversion Processes Scale (ADS). Two hundred and fifty-four emerging adults, 135 women (53.1%) and 119 men (46.9%), participated in a study conducted in Southern and Northern Poland between September 2022 and May 2023. Our study results revealed that those involved in both official religiosity and folk practices exhibit lower levels of deconversion, and this relationship is mediated by transcendent indebtedness. The presented research indicates that the belief and sense of obligation to repay a favor or debt to God is a buffering factor in the tendency to withdraw from the religious community and abandon faith. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child and Adolescent Spirituality/Religiosity and Religious Education)
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20 pages, 505 KiB  
Article
Changes in Haredi Education in Israel: A Comparative Perspective from the United States Using Monsey as a Test Case
by Ilan Fuchs
Religions 2023, 14(11), 1425; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel14111425 - 15 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1378
Abstract
The Haredi community in Israel is the youngest community. It grows at a higher rate than that of the Arab population in Israel. The calls to introduce more secular education are motivated by both a desire to acculturate the Haredi population and bring [...] Read more.
The Haredi community in Israel is the youngest community. It grows at a higher rate than that of the Arab population in Israel. The calls to introduce more secular education are motivated by both a desire to acculturate the Haredi population and bring it closer to the norms and values of the Israeli discourse and from a wish to integrate more people from this community into the job market. Calls to introduce more secular education in the Haredi system have seen constant resistance that has been documented in scholarship. In the U.S., the discussion on the correct role of general education started with a different frame of reference. The existence of meaningful religious education was put into question, and only after the holocaust did American Orthodoxy significantly expand its educational options. This text will describe the diverse spectrum of Haredi educational institutions and their approaches to secular education. I am using Monsey as a test case since it is a good representation of the kaleidoscope of Orthodoxy in the U.S., as far as the different communities are concerned. It is also a very decentralized community, since there is no dominant group in Monsey. This fact allows for more initiatives, including educational initiatives, to be undertaken. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child and Adolescent Spirituality/Religiosity and Religious Education)
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