Role of DNA Damage and Repair in Detrimental Effects of Ionizing Radiation

A special issue of Radiation (ISSN 2673-592X). This special issue belongs to the section "Radiation and Its Application in Oncology and Radiation Protection".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (16 May 2021) | Viewed by 7534

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In this Special Issue, we would like to invite groups working on the role(s) of DNA damage and its repair induced by ionizing radiations as instigators of the full range of biological responses to radiation. Emphasis is given to advances offering mechanistic insights into the ability of radiations with different quality to severely impact cells or tissues. High-quality research or review studies on different species projecting to humans are welcome. Technical advances reporting on the methodologies to accurately measure DNA or other types of biological damage will be highly considered, too. Last but not least, clinical trials or protocols with improvements to radiation therapy and radiation protection are also included.

Prof. Dr. Alexandros G. Georgakilas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Radiation effects
  • Clustered DNA damage
  • DNA repair
  • Radiation therapy
  • Radiation protection
  • Systemic effects of radiation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

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21 pages, 340 KiB  
Review
Use of Biological Dosimetry for Monitoring Medical Workers Occupationally Exposed to Ionizing Radiation
Radiation 2021, 1(2), 95-115; https://doi.org/10.3390/radiation1020009 - 31 Mar 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4305
Abstract
Medical workers are the largest group exposed to man-made sources of ionizing radiation. The annual doses received by medical workers have decreased over the last several decades, however for some applications, like fluoroscopically guided procedures, the occupational doses still remain relatively high. Studies [...] Read more.
Medical workers are the largest group exposed to man-made sources of ionizing radiation. The annual doses received by medical workers have decreased over the last several decades, however for some applications, like fluoroscopically guided procedures, the occupational doses still remain relatively high. Studies show that for some procedures the operator and staff still use insufficient protective and dosimetric equipment, which might cause an underestimation of medical exposures. Physical dosimetry methods are a staple for estimating occupational exposures, although due to the inconsistent use of protection measures, an alternative method such as biological dosimetry might complement the physical methods to achieve a more complete picture. Such methods were used to detect exposures to doses as low as 0.1 mSv/year, and could be useful for a more accurate assessment of genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation in medical workers. Biological dosimetry is usually based on the measurement of the effects present in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Although some methods, such as chromosome aberration scoring or micronucleus assay, show promising results, currently there is no one method recognized as most suitable for dosimetric application in the case of chronic, low-dose exposures. In this review we decided to evaluate different methods used for biological dosimetry in assessment of occupational exposures of medical workers. Full article

Other

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4 pages, 408 KiB  
Commentary
Role of DNA Damage and Repair in Detrimental Effects of Ionizing Radiation
Radiation 2021, 1(1), 1-4; https://doi.org/10.3390/radiation1010001 - 22 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2455
Abstract
Ionizing radiation (IR) is considered a traditional mutagen and genotoxic agent. Exposure to IR affects in all cases biological systems and living organisms from plants to humans mostly in a pernicious way. At low (<0.1 Gy) and low-to-medium doses (0.1–1 Gy), one can [...] Read more.
Ionizing radiation (IR) is considered a traditional mutagen and genotoxic agent. Exposure to IR affects in all cases biological systems and living organisms from plants to humans mostly in a pernicious way. At low (<0.1 Gy) and low-to-medium doses (0.1–1 Gy), one can find in the literature a variety of findings indicating sometimes a positive-like anti-inflammatory effect or detrimental-like toxicity. In this Special Issue and in general in the current research, we would like to acquire works and more knowledge on the role(s) of DNA damage and its repair induced by ionizing radiations as instigators of the full range of biological responses to radiation. Emphasis should be given to advances offering mechanistic insights into the ability of radiations with different qualities to severely impact cells or tissues. High-quality research or review studies on different species projected to humans are welcome. Technical advances reporting on the methodologies to accurately measure DNA or other types of biological damage must be highly considered for the near future in our research community, as well. Last but not least, clinical trials or protocols with improvements to radiation therapy and radiation protection are also included in our vision for the advancement of research regarding biological effects of IR. Full article
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