Advances in Recycling and Utilization of Agricultural Wastes

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental and Green Processes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 1922

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Biotechnology and Environment, Tay Nguyen University, 567 Le Duan Str., Buon Ma Thuot 630000, Vietnam
Interests: agricultural waste; coffee by-product; aquacultural waste; enzymes; bio-convention; bio-processes; active bio-products
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Guest Editor
Công nghệ sinh học, Nha Trang University, Nha Trang, Khanh Hoa 650000, Vietnam
Interests: aquacultural waste; chitin; chitosan; seafood processing; cleaner production

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Guest Editor
Department of Biochemistry, University of Science, Ho Chi Minh City 700000, Vietnam
Interests: fermentation; bioactive products; seafood processing; cleaner production; modified organic compounds

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

To be able to provide food for the worldwide population of 8 billion people, agricultural production is rapidly developing, and thus agricultural waste is also increasing. Agricultural wastes are released from different production areas, such as crop culture, aquaculture, livestock production, and their processing processes. Agricultural wastes not only result in environmental pollution but also waste a lot of valuable biomass resources. Agriculture wastes content-rich organic resources and macro/micro nutrition sources that are suitable for bio-processes, such as bio-convention, biofuels, biochemical, and bio-refinery. The recycling and utilization of agricultural wastes are considered to represent an important step in environmental protection, energy structure, agricultural development, and cleaner production. The use of agricultural waste as a feedstock for the bio-refinery, bio-convention, and composting approach emerges to be an eco-friendly process for the production of biofuel, value-added bio-products, bio-fertilizers, and intensifying energy security.

In this Special Issue, we welcome, but place no limit on, contributions on the following topics:

  1. Bio-conversion from agricultural waste to the high-value production of bioenergy and active bio-products.
  2. Green biotechnologies for recycling and utilization of agricultural waste.
  3. Advance processes for bio-conversion of agricultural waste.
  4. Innovative composting process for agricultural waste treatment.

Prof. Dr. Anh Dzung Nguyen
Prof. Dr. Trang Si Trung
Dr. Dai Nghiep Ngo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • agricultural waste
  • bio-convention
  • bio-products
  • bioenergy
  • green biotechnology
  • green processes
  • cleaner production

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 12142 KiB  
Article
Response Surface Methodology—Central Composite Design Optimization Sugarcane Bagasse Activated Carbon under Varying Microwave-Assisted Pyrolysis Conditions
by Xuexue Chen, Yunji Pei, Xinran Wang, Wenlin Zhou and Li Jiang
Processes 2024, 12(3), 497; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr12030497 - 28 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Sugarcane bagasse (SB) is a widely available agro-industrial waste residue in China that has the potential to be converted into a cost-effective and renewable adsorbent. In this study, activated carbon (AC) was prepared from SB by microwave vacuum pyrolysis using H3PO [...] Read more.
Sugarcane bagasse (SB) is a widely available agro-industrial waste residue in China that has the potential to be converted into a cost-effective and renewable adsorbent. In this study, activated carbon (AC) was prepared from SB by microwave vacuum pyrolysis using H3PO4 as the activator. To enhance the sorption selectivity and yield, the pyrolysis process of SB-activated carbon (SBAC) should be well-designed. Central composite design was employed as an optimized experiment design, and response surface methodology was used to optimize the process parameters for maximized SBAC yield and its iodine number. The results showed that the optimized parameters obtained for the SBAC are 2.47 for the impregnation ratio (IR), 479.07 W for microwave power (MP), 23.86 mm for biomass bed depth, and 12.96 min for irradiation time, with responses of 868.7 mg/g iodine number and 43.88% yield. The anticipated outcomes were substantiated, revealing a marginal 5.4% variance in yield and a mere 1.9% discrepancy in iodine number from the forecasted values. The synthesized adsorbents underwent comprehensive characterization through instrumental methodologies, including FT-IR, BET, and SEM. The SBAC produced by the pyrolysis method contained a regular and homogeneous porous structure with a specific surface area of up to 1697.37 m2/g and a total 1.20 cm 3/g volume, which has favorable adsorption of toxic and harmful substances in the environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Recycling and Utilization of Agricultural Wastes)
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15 pages, 5630 KiB  
Article
Removal of Phosphorus from Domestic Sewage in Rural Areas Using Oyster Shell-Modified Agricultural Waste–Rice Husk Biochar
by Cancan Xu, Rui Liu and Lvjun Chen
Processes 2023, 11(9), 2577; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11092577 - 28 Aug 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 920
Abstract
In order to promote the improvement of rural living environments, the treatment of rural domestic sewage has attracted much attention in China. Meanwhile, the rural regions’ sewage discharge standards are becoming increasingly stringent. However, the standard compliance rate of the total phosphorus (TP) [...] Read more.
In order to promote the improvement of rural living environments, the treatment of rural domestic sewage has attracted much attention in China. Meanwhile, the rural regions’ sewage discharge standards are becoming increasingly stringent. However, the standard compliance rate of the total phosphorus (TP) is very low, and the TP has become the main limiting pollutant for the water pollutant discharge standards of rural domestic sewage treatment facilities. In this study, oyster shell waste was employed as a calcium source, and agricultural waste–rice husk was used as a carbon source to synthesize calcium-modified biochar adsorbent materials (Ca-BC) by a simple one-step pyrolysis method. The resultant Ca-BC adsorbent materials demonstrated efficient phosphate (P) adsorption from aqueous solutions over a wide pH range (3–11) and adsorption selectivity. Ca-BC’s adsorption capacity for P increased with the pyrolysis temperature, increasing from 700 °C to 900 °C, which was attributed to the higher specific surface area and calcium oxide content at higher pyrolysis temperatures. The Ca-BC sample, which was made from oyster shells and rice husks with a mass ratio of 2:1 and a pyrolysis temperature of 900 °C, had a maximum adsorption capacity of 196.2 mg/g. The Langmuir model and pseudo-second-order model were the best at describing the adsorption process, and the predominant sorption mechanism for P is the precipitation of calcium oxide or calcium hydroxide with phosphate to create hydroxyapatite. Ca-BC can effectively remove P from rural domestic sewage. The removal rate of the total phosphorus (TP) in rural domestic sewage is 93.9–99.4%. After the adsorption treatment, the discharge of the TP in the rural sewage met the second-grade (TP < 3 mg/L) or even the first-grade (TP < 2 mg/L) Discharge Standard of Water Pollutants for Centralized Rural Sewage Treatment Facilities (DB33/973-2021). This study provides an experimental basis for efficient P removal by Ca-BC adsorbent materials and suggests possible applications in rural domestic sewage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Recycling and Utilization of Agricultural Wastes)
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