Low-Carbon Combustion Technology and Engineering

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 2073

Special Issue Editors

School of Energy and Power Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China
Interests: renewable energy; biomass; pyrolysis; thermal reaction; CO2 capture; gasification; pickering; alkaline–metal migration
State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China
Interests: low-carbon combustion; coal combustion power plant; advanced combustion mechanism; kinetics research; photothermal application

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Guest Editor
School of Environmental Engineering, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan 430200, China
Interests: efficient and clean utilization of carbon-based fuel; recycling of solid waste; application of renewable energy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Low-carbon simply means less carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide is a key greenhouse gas that drives global climate change. It is released through many different types of activities, such as deforestation, burning fossil fuels, and volcanic eruptions. We are already seeing the effects of climate change, with rising sea levels, melting ice, and higher temperatures across the world. This will negatively affect our weather and environment, which will have a big impact on our way of life.

Low-carbon development has become an important topic around the world, which has attracted wide concern by countries and organizations including the United States, the European Union, China, and other countries. Governments have successively issued carbon emission reduction action guidelines, while low-carbon combustion is one of the most important ways we can reduce carbon emissions. Low-carbon combustion includes more intense process and complex products compared with traditional combustion, and these require in-depth research. The reaction mechanism, pollutant emission, and safety issues in the process of low-carbon combustion are the hot spots worthy of special attention. This Special Issue focuses on the low-carbon combustion mechanism, low-carbon combustion technology development, low-carbon combustion application prospect assessment, and related resources and environmental issues, aiming to provide theoretical and technical guidance for low-carbon, clean, safe, and economic combustion.

This Special Issue on “Low-Carbon Combustion Technology and Engineering” aims to cover recent advances in the development and application of low-carbon combustion process. Topics include, but are not limited to, methods and/or applications in the following areas:

  • Oxy-fuel combustion.
  • NH3/H2 combustion.
  • Coal, biomass, solid waste, and sludge/slime co-combustion.
  • Pollutant emission during low-carbon combustion process.
  • Novel burner technology and application.
  • Safety research during combustion process.
  • Low-carbon combustion economy.
  • Novel low-carbon combustion technology.
  • Energy conservation and carbon emission reduction.

Dr. Long Jiang
Dr. Hanjian Li
Dr. Huanying Chi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • low-carbon combustion
  • combustion mechanism
  • pollutant emission
  • co-combustion
  • combustion burner

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 2561 KiB  
Article
Thermal Behavior Prediction of Sludge Co-Combustion with Coal: Curve Extraction and Artificial Neural Networks
by Chaojun Wen, Junlin Lu, Xiaoqing Lin, Yuxuan Ying, Yunfeng Ma, Hong Yu, Wenxin Yu, Qunxing Huang, Xiaodong Li and Jianhua Yan
Processes 2023, 11(8), 2275; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11082275 - 28 Jul 2023
Viewed by 824
Abstract
Previous studies on the co-combustion of sludge and coal have not effectively utilized the characteristics of the combustion process to predict thermal behavior. Therefore, focusing on these combustion process characteristics is essential to understanding and predicting thermal behavior during the co-combustion of sludge [...] Read more.
Previous studies on the co-combustion of sludge and coal have not effectively utilized the characteristics of the combustion process to predict thermal behavior. Therefore, focusing on these combustion process characteristics is essential to understanding and predicting thermal behavior during the co-combustion of sludge and coal. In this paper, we use thermogravimetric analysis to study the co-combustion of coal and sludge at different temperatures (300–460 °C, 460–530 °C, and 530–600 °C). Our findings reveal that the ignition improves, but the combustion worsens with more sludge. Then, we further employ curve extraction based on temperature and image segmentation to extract the DTG (weight loss rate) curves. We successfully predicted the DTG curves for different blends using nonlinear regression and curve extraction, achieving an excellent R2 of 99.7%. Moreover, the curve extraction method predicts DTG better than artificial neural networks for two samples in terms of R2 (99.7% vs. 99.1% and 99.7% vs. 94.9%), which guides the application of co-combusting coal and sludge. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low-Carbon Combustion Technology and Engineering)
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18 pages, 5003 KiB  
Article
Research on Oxy-Fuel Combustion Characteristics of Two Typical Chinese Coals
by Minghao Wang, Zhenzhou Pang, Guohua Wei, Jingjie Wang, Guangmeng Wang, Geng Jia, Lingbu Zhang and Jingyu Guan
Processes 2023, 11(7), 1933; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11071933 - 27 Jun 2023
Viewed by 700
Abstract
Oxy–fuel (O2/CO2) combustion technology shows great potential for carbon reduction. However, difference in the combustion atmosphere would affect coal combustion characteristics and pollutant emissions. In order to explore oxy–fuel combustion characteristics, two typical Chinese coals, sub–bituminous and lean coal, [...] Read more.
Oxy–fuel (O2/CO2) combustion technology shows great potential for carbon reduction. However, difference in the combustion atmosphere would affect coal combustion characteristics and pollutant emissions. In order to explore oxy–fuel combustion characteristics, two typical Chinese coals, sub–bituminous and lean coal, were utilized. Based on thermogravimetry and pilot–scale test, the ignition and burnout characteristics under oxy–fuel and air combustion atmosphere were investigated. Besides, the NOx emission characteristics were also investigated on the pilot–scale test. Through experimental results, these two kinds of coal showed different combustion characteristics, mainly due to differences in coal quality. Compared with air combustion, oxy–fuel combustion affected the coal combustion process. Firstly, the ignition temperature of sub–bituminous and lean coal decreased from 418 and 477 °C to 405 and 415 °C, respectively; the burnout temperature also decreased from 855 and 985 °C to 808 and 838 °C, respectively. Then, coal combustion performance was evaluated by comprehensive combustion characteristics (S); with an increase in S from, respectively, 3.659 and 2.013 to 4.826 and 3.545 × 10−8(min−2 × K−3), the combustion performance significantly improved. Then, the char burnout time was advanced for 1~3 min. Similar results were obtained on the pilot–scale test. The ignition temperatures decreased from 505 and 552 to 490 and 512 °C, respectively. Moreover, the char burnout rate increased by 0.5~5% and 2~11%, respectively. Lastly, the NOx concentration in flue gas was 2.2~2.6 and 2.0~2.3 times higher for the two kinds of coal under oxy–fuel combustion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low-Carbon Combustion Technology and Engineering)
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