New Trends and Perspectives on In Vitro Digestion Processes and Applications

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Biological Processes and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 April 2024) | Viewed by 2019

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Food Technology of Plant Origin, Poznań University of Life Sciences, 60-637 Poznań, Poland
2. Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Metabolic Diseases, 61-701 Poznań, Poland
Interests: bioactive substances; proteins; lipids; water soluble substances; dietary fibre; carbohydrates; faecal bacteria; in vitro digestion; bioavailability; digestibility

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Guest Editor

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Guest Editor
Department of Applied and Engineering Chemistry, Faculty of Technology Novi Sad, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Serbia
Interests: gas chromatography; mass spectrometry; multivariate analysis; cereals, pseudocereals and industrial plants; functional food; authenticity; food 3D printing
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The bioavailability of food intake is assessed using indicators of intake of nutrients, and has an impact on human health. Due to the difficulties in accessing intestinal contents in vivo, in vitro food absorption performance models were developed.

Most of the models used comprise two or three stages, and include stomach–intestine systems, thin oral cavity–stomach–small intestine systems, or stomach–small intestine–large intestine systems. In in vitro gastrointestinal tract models, different volume (weight) ratios between intestinal fluids can be recommended. Dialysis systems, ultrafiltration, or in vitro intestinal epithelial cell culture models are used as models for nutrient absorption studies. The most popular cell line used to study food absorption is the Caco-2 line. Its morphology and physiology are very similar to natural human enterocytes in vivo. The Caco-2 model is used to study the absorption of proteins, lipids, sugars, vitamins, antioxidants, mycotoxins and other food ingredients.

This Special Issue on “New Trends and Perspectives on In Vitro Digestion Processes and Applications” aims to further the innovative application of the in vitro digestion of food ingredients.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Presentation of novel in vitro digestion models;
  • Digestibility and bioavailability of nutrients: proteins, lipids, carbohydrates;
  • Digestibility and bioavailability of other bioactive substances: lipid and water soluble;
  • Transformation and interactions between components of food during in vitro digestion;
  • Changes in numbers and activity of faecal bacteria during in vitro digestion;
  • Simulation of small-intestinal epithelium.

Dr. Krzysztof Dziedzic
Prof. Dr. Anabela Raymundo
Dr. Kristian Pastor
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioactive substances
  • lipid-soluble substances
  • water soluble substances
  • dietary fibre
  • carbohydrates
  • faecal bacteria
  • in vitro digestion
  • bioavailability
  • digestibility

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

17 pages, 1590 KiB  
Article
Effect of Freeze–Thaw Cycles on Physicochemical and Functional Properties of Ginger Starch
by Yu-Ching Wang, Ya-Ching Liang, Fu-Long Huang and Wen-Chang Chang
Processes 2023, 11(6), 1828; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11061828 - 15 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1619
Abstract
Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe.) starch is a waste product generated during the extraction of bioactive compounds from ginger. This study aimed to treat ginger starch with different freeze–thaw cycles and explore the effect on the functional components, physicochemical properties, and structural properties [...] Read more.
Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe.) starch is a waste product generated during the extraction of bioactive compounds from ginger. This study aimed to treat ginger starch with different freeze–thaw cycles and explore the effect on the functional components, physicochemical properties, and structural properties of ginger starch. The results of the study showed that as the number of freeze–thaw cycles increased, the content of resistant starch, amylose, total starch, and recrystallization in ginger starch increased significantly (p < 0.05). Freeze-dried ginger starch exhibited a C-type crystal structure in the X-ray diffraction pattern. The Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy results also showed that the value of A1047/1022 increased, indicating that the freeze–thaw cycle would increase the degree of starch recrystallization. In terms of physical and chemical properties, compared with gelatinized starch, freeze–thawed starch had low swelling power, high solubility, low peak viscosity and breakdown, indicating higher thermal stability. In conclusion, freeze–thaw treatment can promote the formation of resistant starch from ginger starch and reduce starch hydrolysis, reflecting the potential of low–GI foods. We hope that ginger starch can be used as a raw material for new applications in functional foods. Full article
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