Towards Sustainable and Efficient Bioprocesses: Treatment of Biomass

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental and Green Processes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2024 | Viewed by 2286

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Graduate School, Graduate Program in Food Technology, Autonomous University of Chihuahua, University Circuit 1, New University Campus, Chihuahua 31125, Mexico
Interests: bioprocesses; food waste; fermentation; bioproducts; biobased chemicals; biofuels

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Diponegoro University, Jl. Prof. Soedarto, SH, Kampus Undip Tembalang, Semarang 50275, Indonesia
Interests: bioprocesses; biopolymers; encapsulations; bioproducts; functional foods; biomaterials

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Grupo de Reciclado y Valorización de Materiales Residuales (REVAL), Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas (IIM-CSIC), r/Eduardo Cabello, 36208 Vigo, Galicia, Spain
Interests: biochemical engineering; marine biorefinery; food waste valorisation; mathematical modeling of bioprocesses, fermentation; marine biopolymers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of efficient bioprocesses for the production of biobased products and value-added biomolecules has emerged as a solution to the demands of the increasing human population and due urbanization requirements. However, the greatest challenge is the selection and design of the most efficient performance routes in such bioprocesses. In this sense, two major bottlenecks can be identified: the pretreatment of biomasses for the liberation of sugars, proteins, oils and micronutrients, and the extraction of bio compounds. Thus, the development of eco-friendly bioprocesses will lead to more sustainable production systems that embrace social equality, environmental protection and economic growth.     

This Special Issue is to attract original research contributions and review articles in the field of pretreatment of biomass applying techniques such as chemical, physical, physicochemical, biological processes, and irradiation. As well as, advances in the extraction of biocompounds after a given bioprocess. Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Sustainable and effective pretreatment of biomass or bioresources;
  • Large-scale industrial application of biomass pretreatment;
  • Extraction of biomolecules, bioproducts, biobased chemicals and biofuels by green technologies;
  • Enzyme-assisted extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, ultrasound-assisted extraction and pulse electric field methods.

Dr. Ivan Salmerón Ochoa
Prof. Dr. Dyah Hesti Wardhani
Dr. José Antonio Vázquez Álvarez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioprocess
  • pretreatment of biomasses or bioresources
  • extraction of biocompounds
  • green extraction technologies
  • sustainable
  • eco-friendly

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

16 pages, 890 KiB  
Article
Preliminary Results of Innovative Two-Stage Torrefaction Technology Applied for Thermochemical Treatment of Sunflower Husk
by Artemy Nebyvaev, Dmitry Klimov, Artem Ryzhenkov and Mathieu Brulé
Processes 2023, 11(8), 2486; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11082486 - 18 Aug 2023
Viewed by 794
Abstract
This article proposes an innovative two-stage technology for biomass torrefaction generating high-quality biochar, more specifically biocoal, as solid fuel, and offering a promising solution to the challenges posed by the combustion of biomass. In particular, the higher quality of biochar as solid fuel [...] Read more.
This article proposes an innovative two-stage technology for biomass torrefaction generating high-quality biochar, more specifically biocoal, as solid fuel, and offering a promising solution to the challenges posed by the combustion of biomass. In particular, the higher quality of biochar as solid fuel reduces the build-up of unmanageable deposits on fired surfaces, as these deposits inhibit heat transfer and reduce the efficiency of biomass boilers. The proposed two-stage technology involves torrefaction in a hearth-type reactor at temperatures up to 250 °C, followed by a subsequent stage of cooling achieved through washing with water. The two-stage torrefaction technology is integrated within a vertical hearth reactor vessel composed of three superimposed trays serving for biomass input, torrefaction, and water washing combined with biomass cooling, respectively. Upon contact with torrefied biomass, cooling water turned into water vapor; hence, eliminating the requirement for subsequent biomass separation and drying. The system was tested on sunflower husk, and results showed a reduction in the content of problematic elements such as alkali metal chlorides or sulfur compounds in biochar ash, suggesting lower corrosion rates of convective heating surfaces of the boiler under ash sediments. It is hypothesized that, while water exited hot biomass in the form of water vapor instead of liquid water, as is typically the case in water-washing processes, a share of undesirable elements may still have been removed from biomass through vaporization, without necessitating any additional process for ash removal. Hence, the index values calculated according to the chemical analysis of biomass ash suggested that sunflower husk biochar (biocoal) resulting from the proposed two-stage torrefaction process may display fuel characteristics similar to biomasses whose combustion ash may form reduced levels of deposits on boiler surfaces. Therefore, the proposed technology holds the potential to improve solid fuel characteristics of biomass, targeting enhanced efficiency and sustainability of biomass-fired power plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Towards Sustainable and Efficient Bioprocesses: Treatment of Biomass)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 2026 KiB  
Article
The Fermentation of a Marine Probiotic Bacterium on Low-Cost Media Formulated with Industrial Fish Gelatin Waterstreams and Collagen Hydrolysates
by José Antonio Vázquez, Adrián Pedreira, Iván Salmerón, Dyah H. Wardhani and Jesus Valcarcel
Processes 2023, 11(8), 2397; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11082397 - 9 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1085
Abstract
Chemical effluents generated by the isolation of fish gelatin and collagen hydrolysates produced from the enzyme proteolysis of skin wastes are protein-rich substrates that could be used as nutrients in bacterial bioprocessing. In this study, the suitability of such nutrients in supporting the [...] Read more.
Chemical effluents generated by the isolation of fish gelatin and collagen hydrolysates produced from the enzyme proteolysis of skin wastes are protein-rich substrates that could be used as nutrients in bacterial bioprocessing. In this study, the suitability of such nutrients in supporting the growth of a marine probiotic bacterium, Phaeobacter sp. DIFR 27-4, was studied. Both gelatin effluents and collagen hydrolysates were obtained from the skins of shark, tuna, salmon and turbot. The chemical composition of the substrates included the complete presence of all quantified amino acids. Low-cost marine culture media were formulated with these protein materials alongside a very low concentration of yeast extract and marine water. In batch cultures with gelatin effluents, the growth rates of the strain DIFR 27-4 were somewhat lower than those found in the control marine commercial media. In the case of the hydrolysates, the bacterial production of biomass was similar or higher than that observed in the control, and larger than that observed in the effluents. A simple evaluation of production costs in the different substrates studied indicated that around a 73–125-fold reduction can be achieved when alternative media are used, in comparison to the use of commercial marine broth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Towards Sustainable and Efficient Bioprocesses: Treatment of Biomass)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop