Synthesis and Extraction Processes of Biotechnological Drugs of Plant Origin

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmaceutical Processes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2024 | Viewed by 4658

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: phytotherapy; phytochemistry; natural product chemistry; chromatography; extraction procedures; secondary metabolites
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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Wroclaw Medical University, Borowska 211, 50-556 Wroclaw, Poland
Interests: plant biotechnology; plant in vitro cultures; plant physiology (oxidative stress, bio-elicitor response); molecular biology (gene expression level, elucidation of plant biosynthetic pathways); phytochemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biotechnologically derived drugs of plant origin serve as natural therapeutic products and a valuable alternative for synthetic drugs. The quality of such products is based not only on elucidating the biosynthesis pathways but also on highly precise synthesis and extraction processes. Due to a high variety of specialized metabolites, their production in plant material, derived from a number of plant species, is still under investigation. Similarly, new methods of extraction, separation, identification and isolation of these compounds are still being developed.

This Special Issue is dedicated to Synthesis and Extraction Processes of Biotechnological Drugs of Plant Origin, including, but not limited to, elucidation and utilization of biosynthetic pathways for production of valuable primary and secondary metabolites, methods for increasing the yield of their production, as well as their isolation from biological matrices and media.

Prof. Dr. Marijana Zovko Končić
Dr. Sylwia Zielińska
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • biosynthesis
  • biosynthetic pathways
  • extraction procedures
  • medicinal plant
  • plant biotechnology
  • plant cell cultures
  • plant metabolites

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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24 pages, 6228 KiB  
Article
Optimizing Microwave-Assisted Extraction from Levisticum officinale WDJ Koch Roots Using Pareto Optimal Solutions
by Michał Plawgo, Sławomir Kocira and Andrea Bohata
Processes 2024, 12(5), 1026; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr12051026 - 18 May 2024
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Abstract
The current research trend is not only focused on advanced techniques to intensify the extraction of bioactive compounds from plants, but also on the optimization process. The objective of this work was the implementation of the multiple criteria analysis using navigation on Pareto [...] Read more.
The current research trend is not only focused on advanced techniques to intensify the extraction of bioactive compounds from plants, but also on the optimization process. The objective of this work was the implementation of the multiple criteria analysis using navigation on Pareto sets to determine the optimal parameters for the microwave-assisted extraction of Levisticum officinale WDJ Koch roots in order to obtain the maximum efficiency of the antioxidant potential of the extracts. The optimized parameters were extraction time, microwave power, and plant biomass/solvent ratio, while the evaluation criteria were based on the total phenols, flavonoids, reducing sugars, and antioxidant capacity. It was shown that the process parameters analyzed, i.e., biomass/solvent ratio, process time, and microwave power, determined the extraction efficiency of total phenolic content (TPC). A different observation was made for the analysis of total flavonoid content (TFC) and total antioxidant potential (TAA). Compared to the assessment of TFC and TAA, a completely different trend was observed for the analysis of total reducing sugars (RSC). Sets of Pareto optimal, compromise, and preferred solutions were identified that will maximize the efficiency of the extraction of bioactive compounds from biomass. Due to the determined number of Pareto optimal solutions, an approach related to the introduction of preferences in the optimization procedure was applied. It was shown that for a satisfactory level of bioactive compounds, extraction should be carried out at a maximum microwave power of 750 W. Preferred solutions were obtained for root biomass to water ratios ranging from 0.0536 g/mL to 0.0679 g/mL. The preferred optimal time for microwave-assisted water extraction ranged from 64.2857 to 85.7143 s. Full article
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Review

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16 pages, 1188 KiB  
Review
The Prospects of Algae-Derived Vitamins and Their Precursors for Sustainable Cosmeceuticals
by Neha Arora and George P. Philippidis
Processes 2023, 11(2), 587; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11020587 - 15 Feb 2023
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 4004
Abstract
Aquatic algae are a rich source of a wide range of bioproducts intended to compete for a sizable global market share. Thanks to the gradual shift towards the use of natural products, microalgae-derived bioactive compounds offer an ecofriendly and vegan option to the [...] Read more.
Aquatic algae are a rich source of a wide range of bioproducts intended to compete for a sizable global market share. Thanks to the gradual shift towards the use of natural products, microalgae-derived bioactive compounds offer an ecofriendly and vegan option to the cosmeceutical sector, whose products aim to improve skin health but currently consist of mostly synthetic chemicals. In particular, algae-derived vitamins and their precursors are being explored and widely used in the cosmeceuticals industry as compounds that contain biologically active ingredients with therapeutic benefits. The present review highlights the current strategies for industrial production of an array of vitamins from algae for cosmeceutical applications. When compared to traditional plant sources, algae have been found to accumulate vitamins, such as A, B1, B2, B6, B12, C and E, in high concentrations. The purpose of this review is to provide context for the development of a green and sustainable algae-derived bioeconomy by summarizing and comparing the current market for vitamins and precursors derived from algae, as well as presenting novel strategies and key findings from the most recent research in this area. Emphasis is placed on novel biotechnological interventions that encompass genetic modifications, genetic engineering, and media development to enhance vitamin biosynthesis. Full article
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