Food Processing Technologies Applied to Cereals, Legumes, Oilseeds, Alternative Food Raw Materials and Their Derivatives

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Process Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 September 2022) | Viewed by 26372

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Engineering, Faculty of Food Science and Technology, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca, 400372 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: lipid and oilseeds technology; infrared spectroscopy; chemometrics; lipid oxidation; confectionery technology; food texture and rheology; food technology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website1 Website2 Website3
Guest Editor
Food Engineering Department, Faculty of Food Science and Technology, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, 400372 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: wheat flour; breadmaking; gluten-free baked goods; sourdough; lactic bacteria

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are writing to invite you to submit a review or research paper to the upcoming Special Issue—“Cereals, Legumes, Oilseeds, Alternative Food Raw Materials and Their Derivatives Processing” — in the journal Processes.

As a result of the increasing food demands due to the growing global population, a major challenge for the food industry is to supply high-quality nutritious food. In this context, food processing includes both conventional and alternative raw materials to develop innovative food and to raise their consumer acceptance and public awareness. This approach could lead not only to food with enhanced nutritional quality and health benefits, but it could also be ecologically advantageous. In this context, cereals (wheat, rice, corn, barley, rye, oat, sorghum, millet, triticale, etc.), pseudocereals (quinoa, amaranth, buckwheat, chia, teff, etc.), legumes and pulses (pea, chickpea, lentil, soybean, etc.), oilseed crops (sunflower, rapeseeds, peanuts, hemp, flax, sesame, almonds, moringa seeds, walnut, cottonseeds, safflower, camellia, cocoa beans, palm fruit, coconut, olives, etc.), and alternative edible raw materials, such as non-timber forest products (nuts, seeds, berries, mushrooms, sap, foliage, medicinal plants, etc.), microalgae, insects, and so on, are currently used / or might represent potential new ingredients in several food technologies, including bakery, pastry, alcoholic drinks, beverages, starch, oil and fats, confectionery, meat alternatives, and so on. In addition, the processing technologies (storage, milling, fractionation, pearling, germination, flaking, drying, frying, steaming, roasting, baking, expeller pressing, extrusion puffing, baric treatments, pulsed electric field, etc.) transform these raw materials into palatable, digestible, and suitable for consumption products. Innovative food optimization requires a complete understanding of matrix interactions to design products with the desired quality characteristics from nutritional and sensorial point of view.

This Special Issue is focused on the characterization of techno-functional properties related to processing technologies for various conventional and alternative raw materials as well as their derivatives (flours, oils and fats, extracts, isolates, etc.), in order to obtain innovative food with improved quality characteristics and good consumers’ acceptance.

Dr. Vlad Mureşan
Prof. Dr. Adriana Paucean
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cereals
  • legumes
  • pulses
  • oilseeds
  • pseudocereals
  • flour
  • oil
  • food sustainability
  • non-timber forest products

Published Papers (9 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

4 pages, 207 KiB  
Editorial
Special Issue on “Food Processing Technologies Applied to Cereals, Legumes, Oilseeds, Alternative Food Raw Materials and Their Derivatives”
by Adriana Păucean and Vlad Mureșan
Processes 2023, 11(1), 150; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11010150 - 4 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1462
Abstract
A significant problem for the food industry is delivering high-quality, healthy food in response to the rising food demands brought on by the expanding worldwide population [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

14 pages, 1401 KiB  
Article
Extrusion Modification: Effect of Extrusion on the Functional Properties and Structure of Rice Protein
by Yuxuan Gao, Yi Sun, Yu Zhang, Yuankuo Sun and Tie Jin
Processes 2022, 10(9), 1871; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr10091871 - 16 Sep 2022
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 2983
Abstract
Modification of rice protein by extrusion technology can broaden the range of processing and applications for food and feed raw materials. In this study, rice protein was extruded at different screw speeds (100–250 rpm), extrusion temperatures (90–150 °C), and moisture contents (25–40%). Compared [...] Read more.
Modification of rice protein by extrusion technology can broaden the range of processing and applications for food and feed raw materials. In this study, rice protein was extruded at different screw speeds (100–250 rpm), extrusion temperatures (90–150 °C), and moisture contents (25–40%). Compared with an unextruded protein, the functional properties and structural properties of textured rice protein were evaluated. The results showed that, after extrusion, the solubility of protein was improved, by up to 19.76%, which was 45.23% higher than pre-extrusion; the water holding capacity of extruded rice protein was highest at 200 rpm, 130 °C, and 25%, which could be enhanced by 37.74%; the emulsion stability was enhanced by 152.82% at 200 rpm, 130 °C, and 35%. Under extrusion, the content of sulfhydryl and disulfide bonds of rice protein decreased significantly; the hydrogen bond content increased, and the ionic bond content decreased; the hydrophobic effect decrease, except at 200 rpm, 130 °C, and 40%. The microstructure changed significantly after extrusion, producing protein aggregates with a tight structure. No new characteristic peaks appeared after extrusion, but transformation occurred between the components of the secondary structure: β-sheet and β-turn angles to an α-helix structure toward the transformation, but β-sheet was still the main component. As a safe and efficient modification method, extrusion cooking can effectively improve the functional properties of rice protein to enrich the application of rice protein resources. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 1788 KiB  
Article
Eugenol, Isolated from the Essential Oil from Lonicera japonica Flower Buds, Could Increase the Oxidative Stability of Sunflower Oil in the Deep-Frying Procedure of Youtiao
by Wenchang Fan, Haoduo Yang, Yudong Meng, Dongying Wang, Chenhui Li, Suhong Lu, Ranzhi Ye and Francesca Blasi
Processes 2022, 10(9), 1670; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr10091670 - 23 Aug 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1470
Abstract
In order to assess the sunflower oil (SFO) oxidative stability that was added by the essential oils extracted from Lonicera japonica flower buds (LJEO) during deep-frying at 180 °C for 30 h, we clarified the compound/compounds of LJEO that improved the oxidative stability [...] Read more.
In order to assess the sunflower oil (SFO) oxidative stability that was added by the essential oils extracted from Lonicera japonica flower buds (LJEO) during deep-frying at 180 °C for 30 h, we clarified the compound/compounds of LJEO that improved the oxidative stability of SFO. The results displayed that the addition of LJEO (0.06 g/kg) could significantly restrict the elevation or the reduction in the levels of total polar compounds (TPC), thiobarbituric acid (TBA), conjugated dienes and conjugated trienes, and the values for polymer, viscosity and the color of SFO during the whole period. Meanwhile, the reduction in the sensory attributes, including flavor, taste, crispness and overall acceptability of the fried product, youtiao, was obviously restricted as well. After the bioassay-guided fractionation of LJEO and repeated deep-frying at 180 °C for 30 h, one of its chemical constituents, eugenol, was demonstrated to be the very compound that did significantly inhibit the oxidative rancidity of the SFO. Therefore, eugenol may be employed as potential effective natural antioxidants to inhibit the oxidative rancidity of SFO during its deep-frying procedures. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

14 pages, 6634 KiB  
Article
Mathematical Perspectives in the Variable Texture Products Cutting Process
by Mirela Panainte-Lehăduș, Emilian Moșneguțu, Narcis Bârsan, Gabriela Andrioai, Claudia Tomozei and Oana Irimia
Processes 2022, 10(8), 1603; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr10081603 - 13 Aug 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 971
Abstract
The methods utilized to construct and identify the mathematical equation that characterizes the cutting of items with varied textures are presented in this work. Using laboratory equipment, the cutting process was carried out experimentally. The cutting energy was calculated based on the experimental [...] Read more.
The methods utilized to construct and identify the mathematical equation that characterizes the cutting of items with varied textures are presented in this work. Using laboratory equipment, the cutting process was carried out experimentally. The cutting energy was calculated based on the experimental results. The energy required to perform this process is directly influenced by the textural characteristics of the products used, as per the analysis of the experimental results obtained after the cutting process (density, humidity, products with or without peel). The gathered information was used to develop a general equation that would properly describe the process. Table Curve 3D software was used to create mathematical equations that define the relationship between input parameters, the type of product being cut, cutting speed, and output parameters, i.e., cutting energy. The equations that have the same correlation coefficient were discovered using the working methodology; it was specifically designed for this purpose. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 1405 KiB  
Article
Phytosterol, Tocopherol and Carotenoid Retention during Commercial Processing of Brassica napus (Canola) Oil
by Clare L. Flakelar, Randy Adjonu, Gregory Doran, Julia A. Howitt, David J. Luckett and Paul D. Prenzler
Processes 2022, 10(3), 580; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr10030580 - 16 Mar 2022
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2832
Abstract
Brassica napus (canola) seed is a rich source of phytosterols, tocopherols and carotenoids, which all have recognized health benefits, although these are reduced or lost during crude oil refinement. Many studies are now outdated, so new research to monitor bioactive retention through current [...] Read more.
Brassica napus (canola) seed is a rich source of phytosterols, tocopherols and carotenoids, which all have recognized health benefits, although these are reduced or lost during crude oil refinement. Many studies are now outdated, so new research to monitor bioactive retention through current processing techniques is warranted. In this work, canola seed, in-process seed, and oil samples were collected from the major stages of five commercial canola oil processes. Analysis of phytosterols, tocopherols and carotenoids indicated seed pre-treatment enhanced bioactive concentrations in the crude oil. Although the bleaching step in each process eliminated all carotenoids, high concentrations of phytosterols and tocopherols remained in the refined oil across all processes, with losses notably lower than those found in previous reports. Moreover, crude oil samples from a two-stage cold pressing process showed greatly enriched concentrations of tocopherols (+122%), sterols (+140%) and carotenoids (+217%). The results show that modern Australian canola oil processing retains high phytosterol and tocopherol concentrations and warrants further investigation into bioactive enrichment strategies. Given the growing interest in health-enhanced foods, this study provides opportunities for nutrition and health-enhanced oil products and the potential for adding value in the edible oil industry. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 9949 KiB  
Article
Faba Bean Fractions for 3D Printing of Protein-, Starch- and Fibre-Rich Foods
by Mathias Johansson, Klara Nilsson, Fanny Knab and Maud Langton
Processes 2022, 10(3), 466; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr10030466 - 25 Feb 2022
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3435
Abstract
Food 3D printing allows for the production of personalised foods in terms of shape and nutrition. In this study, we examined whether protein-, starch- and fibre-rich fractions extracted from faba beans can be combined to produce fibre- and protein-rich printable food inks for [...] Read more.
Food 3D printing allows for the production of personalised foods in terms of shape and nutrition. In this study, we examined whether protein-, starch- and fibre-rich fractions extracted from faba beans can be combined to produce fibre- and protein-rich printable food inks for extrusion-based 3D printing. Small amplitude oscillatory shear measurements were used to characterise the inks while compression tests and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterise the freeze-dried samples. We found that rheological parameters such as storage modulus, loss tangent and yield stress were related to ink printability and shape stability. Investigations on the effect of ink composition, infill pattern (honeycomb/grid) and direction of compression on textural and microstructural properties of freeze-dried 3D-printed objects revealed no clear effect of infill pattern, but a strong effect of direction of compression. Microstructure heterogeneity seemed to be correlated with the textural properties of the printed objects. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 951 KiB  
Article
Broken Riceberry (BR) Powder Production Using a Double Drum Dryer and Its Utilization in the Development of Instant Beverages
by Sriwiang Rittisak, Ratchanee Charoen and Wanticha Savedboworn
Processes 2022, 10(2), 341; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr10020341 - 11 Feb 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1982
Abstract
This study was designed to examine broken riceberry (BR) powder production through the use of a double drum dryer. There were two stages involved: (1) to study the optimized drum drying conditions for BR powder using response surface methodology (RSM), and (2) to [...] Read more.
This study was designed to examine broken riceberry (BR) powder production through the use of a double drum dryer. There were two stages involved: (1) to study the optimized drum drying conditions for BR powder using response surface methodology (RSM), and (2) to utilize BR powder for the development of instant beverages. According to the results, the optimum drum drying condition was a drum temperature of 125 °C and drum speed of 1.0 rpm. Under these conditions, BR powder contained moisture = 5.81%, water activity = 0.494, total color difference 15.45, DPPH scavenging activity = 73.93%, water solubility index (WSI) = 52.33%, and water absorption index (WAI) = 10.52. For the utilization of BR powder for developing instant beverages, the product quality was light purple in color, water activity = 0.354, DPPH scavenging activity = 45%, WSI = 65.75%, and WAI = 12.25. The developed instant beverage contained 4.28% moisture, 13.89% protein, 12.42% fat, 4.23% fiber, and 2.23% ash. The microbial properties were <10 CFU/g for aerobic plate count and yeast and mold. The overall liking score was ‘like moderately’. This study indicated that the BR powder is of good quality and has potential in the beverage industry. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research

22 pages, 1474 KiB  
Review
Impact of Hydrolysis, Acetylation or Succinylation on Functional Properties of Plant-Based Proteins: Patents, Regulations, and Future Trends
by Georgina L. Heredia-Leza, Luz María Martínez and Cristina Chuck-Hernandez
Processes 2022, 10(2), 283; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr10020283 - 31 Jan 2022
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 4992
Abstract
Nowadays, plant-based proteins are gaining momentum due to their wide availability, good amino acid content, and their market appeal. Unfortunately, these molecules usually have low water solubility, affecting other functional characteristics, such as foaming and emulsification, opening technological opportunities for research. Some plant-based [...] Read more.
Nowadays, plant-based proteins are gaining momentum due to their wide availability, good amino acid content, and their market appeal. Unfortunately, these molecules usually have low water solubility, affecting other functional characteristics, such as foaming and emulsification, opening technological opportunities for research. Some plant-based protein applications rely on adjustments to final formulations and changing these chemical structures to produce new protein ingredients is also a path widely used in recent research. These modifications can be classified as physical or chemical, the latter being the most popular, and hydrolysis is one of the more widely reported modifications. This review explores the application of chemical modifications to plant-based proteins to improve techno-functional properties, when applied as part of food formulations. In addition, acetylation and succinylation, as the second and third most used processes, are discussed, including a deep analysis of their effects. Furthermore, since there is no concise compilation of patents associated with these technological efforts, some of the references that involve chemical modifications and current regulations used worldwide for novel foods produced with these technologies are included in this review. Finally, future perspectives for the chemical modification of proteins are discussed. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

20 pages, 1887 KiB  
Review
Ancient Wheat Species: Biochemical Profile and Impact on Sourdough Bread Characteristics—A Review
by Larisa Rebeca Șerban, Adriana Păucean, Simona Maria Man, Maria Simona Chiş and Vlad Mureşan
Processes 2021, 9(11), 2008; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9112008 - 10 Nov 2021
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 4619
Abstract
In recent years, the attention of farmers, bakers and consumers towards ancient wheat species has been increasing. Low demands of pedo-climatic growth factors, the suitability for organic cultivation along with their high nutritional quality and their content in pro-health compounds make them extremely [...] Read more.
In recent years, the attention of farmers, bakers and consumers towards ancient wheat species has been increasing. Low demands of pedo-climatic growth factors, the suitability for organic cultivation along with their high nutritional quality and their content in pro-health compounds make them extremely attractive for bakers and modern consumers, equally. On the other hand, in recent years, sourdough has gained attention due to its ability to produce new functionally active molecules with higher bioaccessibility and thus to produce bread with enhanced nutritional quality. This paper highlights the relevant nutritional profile of einkorn, spelt, emmer and Khorasan which could lead to bread with improved textural, sensorial, microbial and nutritional characteristics through sourdough fermentation. The ancient wheat species could be used as promising substitutes for common wheat flour for the design of innovative types of bread, even for special needs. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop