Advances in New Methods of Wastewater Treatment and Management

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental and Green Processes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 5033

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Academy of Sustainable Regional Development, El Colegio de Veracruz, Xalapa 91000, Veracruz, Mexico
Interests: water; ecological engineering; nature-based solutions; treatment wetlands; circular economy; sustainability; social process for wastewater management

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor Assistant
Academy of Sustainable Regional Development, El Colegio deVeracruz, Xalapa 91000, Veracruz, Mexico
Interests: governance; wetlands; water; socio-environmental problems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The wastewater treatment field requires to be optimized and sustainable technologies in terms of their performance, environmental footprint, and environmentally friendliness. Likewise, societal concerns should be considered in their management and operation.

The prevention and remediation of water pollution requires many diverse tools applicable in different ecological and sustainable contexts. Greater knowledge on recent developments and innovations in wastewater treatment strategies and processes is needed. This Special Issue will cover the most recent sustainable treatment technologies developed for wastewater treatment and management.

Contributions from both academia and industry as well as experiences from full-scale applications and case studies are welcome. Review papers summarizing the existing knowledge and technological status of different strategies and processes for wastewater treatment and management are also welcome. The topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Conventional wastewater treatment;
  • Aerobic/anaerobic systems;
  • Nature-based solutions;
  • constructed or treatment wetlands;
  • Chemical treatment;
  • Emergent or industrial pollutant removals;
  • Microbial fuel cells;
  • Filtration;
  • Methods and processes for the management of wastewater treatment;
  • Sustainable options for the operation of treatment systems.

Prof. Dr. José Luis Marín-Muñiz
Guest Editor

Dr. Gonzalo Ortega Pineda
Guest Editor Assistant

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wastewater
  • sustainability
  • process and management in wastewater treatment
  • innovation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 5569 KiB  
Article
Retrofitting of a Full-Scale Dewatering Operation for Industrial Polymer Effluent Sludge
by Atiq Malik, Elnaz Sohani, Mahmoud Saleh Shahreza and Aliyu M. Aliyu
Processes 2024, 12(4), 703; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr12040703 - 29 Mar 2024
Viewed by 643
Abstract
This paper presents a comprehensive study on the redesign of a dewatering process in a polymer sludge wastewater treatment plant. The study focuses on addressing the challenges posed by high levels of organic pollutants in the sludge, with the aim of enhancing dewaterability, [...] Read more.
This paper presents a comprehensive study on the redesign of a dewatering process in a polymer sludge wastewater treatment plant. The study focuses on addressing the challenges posed by high levels of organic pollutants in the sludge, with the aim of enhancing dewaterability, reducing odors, and minimizing suspended solids. Initially, a vacuum belt filter was utilized, but it proved inadequate in removing sufficient water, resulting in substantial annual disposal costs. To address this issue, a filter press system was proposed, which significantly improved the dewatering process, producing a dryer cake with a solid content of 35%, compared to 19% achieved by the vacuum belt filter. Performance evaluation of the processes was conducted based on concentration of solids and capture efficiency, demonstrating the superiority of the filter press method. Furthermore, the filtrate obtained through the filter press met local discharge regulations, eliminating the need for additional treatment before disposal. The implementation of the filter press not only improved the dewatering process and ensured compliance with discharge standards but also resulted in substantial cost savings of up to 50% per year. The payback period for the current system was determined to be 1.5 years, highlighting the economic advantages of the filter press. Overall, the findings of this study emphasize the practical advantages of the filter press in handling sludge cakes and filtrate for disposal, making it a favorable choice for dewatering polymer sludge and other wastewater treatment plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in New Methods of Wastewater Treatment and Management)
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10 pages, 1238 KiB  
Article
Treatment Wetland with Thalia geniculata for Wastewater Depuration in the Department of Sucre, Colombia
by Vicente Vergara-Flórez, Jorge Mieles-Galindo, Graciela Nani, Mayerlin Sandoval-Herazo and Luis Carlos Sandoval Herazo
Processes 2023, 11(9), 2754; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11092754 - 15 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1400
Abstract
Municipal and industrial wastewater discharge is a longstanding environmental problem that pollutes water bodies, affecting both the landscape and human health. In the department of Sucre, Colombia, nearby urban sewage is discharged into the Arroyo Grande de la Sabana, and only Sincelejo city [...] Read more.
Municipal and industrial wastewater discharge is a longstanding environmental problem that pollutes water bodies, affecting both the landscape and human health. In the department of Sucre, Colombia, nearby urban sewage is discharged into the Arroyo Grande de la Sabana, and only Sincelejo city has a treatment system in place. Therefore, it is critical to identify effective treatment methods for removing contaminants from water. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a constructed wetland (CW) with horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF) planted with Thalia geniculata for treating wastewater from the Arroyo Grande de la Sabana in Sucre, Colombia. The study investigated the effectiveness of a constructed wetland planted with Thalia geniculata for treating wastewater from the Arroyo Grande de la Sabana in Sucre, Colombia. Two different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 3 and 5 days were tested, and the plant population density was analyzed to determine the better adaptation of plants to the constructed wetlands. The results showed that on the fifth day of treatment, nitrate concentrations decreased by 33.22%, nitrite by 93.04%, and phosphate by 95.66%. Additionally, the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) values decreased by 97.27% and 80.27%, respectively. On the third day of retention, turbidity, and total suspended solids (TSS) in the water decreased by 90.13% and 83.08%, respectively. The study concluded that the 5-day HRT was most effective in removing contaminants such as nitrites, nitrates, and phosphates, while the 3-day HRT was more efficient for TSS, turbidity, total coliforms (TCs), and fecal coliforms (FCs). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in New Methods of Wastewater Treatment and Management)
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15 pages, 2348 KiB  
Article
Evaluating Nationwide Non-Point Source Pollution of Crop Farming and Related Environmental Risk in China
by Yang Duan, Hongqiang Jiang, Xiao Huang, Wenhui Zhu, Jie Zhang, Bo Wang and Wenjun Wu
Processes 2023, 11(8), 2377; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11082377 - 7 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 955
Abstract
The increase in non-point source (NPS) pollution from agricultural cultivation and production sources has been cited as one of the main reasons for water eutrophication. This study built a national NPS database and estimated the nutrient (including both nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)) [...] Read more.
The increase in non-point source (NPS) pollution from agricultural cultivation and production sources has been cited as one of the main reasons for water eutrophication. This study built a national NPS database and estimated the nutrient (including both nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)) balance and NPS pollution of crop farming at the county level in 2015. Finally, the NPS pollution risks were assessed, and relative policy suggestions were provided. The results indicated that (1) in 2015, the total amounts of N and P surpluses in China were 7.95 and 7.39 million tons, respectively. The south of the Yangtze River had a relatively higher nutrient surplus compared to that in northern China. (2) The NPS emissions for N and P in China were 168.84 × 104 tons and 8.93 × 104 tons, respectively, with the highest NPS loads occurring in the eastern part of the Sichuan Basin, southern China and southwestern China, while the lowest loads occurred in northeast China. (3) The potential risk assessment results showed that a broad division emerged at the Yangtze River basin, with the northern area under lower risk than the southern area. This estimation work can provide guidance and technical support for local government and policy makers to control NPS pollution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in New Methods of Wastewater Treatment and Management)
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Review

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17 pages, 3719 KiB  
Review
Technological Innovations in the Application of Constructed Wetlands: A Review
by Luis E. Fernández Ramírez, Sergio A. Zamora-Castro, Luis Carlos Sandoval-Herazo, Agustín L. Herrera-May, Rolando Salgado-Estrada and Dylan A. De La Cruz-Dessavre
Processes 2023, 11(12), 3334; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11123334 - 30 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1532
Abstract
Constructed wetlands (CWs) are highly effective in wastewater treatment and have generated lines of research with a focus on technological development and implemented innovations. This work concentrates on the most recent technical and scientific advances that have obtained optimal results in the construction [...] Read more.
Constructed wetlands (CWs) are highly effective in wastewater treatment and have generated lines of research with a focus on technological development and implemented innovations. This work concentrates on the most recent technical and scientific advances that have obtained optimal results in the construction of CWs using sustainable materials and the use of ornamental plants and other aquatic plants. Efficiency is also documented through models and simulation with neural networks, the use of the random forest method, and the use of software such as MODFLOW, MODPATH, and COMSOL Multiphysics. The information shown is structured by geographical area and addresses regions of Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, South America, and Oceania. It is important to consider that the optimization and innovation of CW for pollutant removal may benefit developing countries that do not have sufficient infrastructure to meet the demand for municipal and industrial wastewater. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in New Methods of Wastewater Treatment and Management)
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