Development of Polymer-Based Materials for Cell and Drug Delivery

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomacromolecules, Biobased and Biodegradable Polymers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 August 2024 | Viewed by 1664

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
SERGAS (Servizo Galego de Saude) and IDIS (Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Santiago), NEIRID Lab (Neuroendocrine Interactions in Rheumatology and Inflammatory Diseases), Research Laboratory 9, Santiago University Clinical Hospital, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Interests: biopolymers; hydrogels; nanoparticles

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Guest Editor
Servizo Galego de Saude and Institute of Biomedical Research (SERGAS-IDIS), The NEIRID LAB, Neuroendocrine Interactions in Rheumatology and Inflammatory Diseases, Santiago University Clinical Hospital, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, Spain
Interests: leptin; adipokines; inflammation; arthritis; cartilage pathophysiology; immunometabolism; natural drugs
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The physical and chemical properties of polymeric materials need to be precisely controlled in order to fit their aimed application requirements. Polymers used for both cellular and drug delivery must be biocompatible, biodegradable over a reasonable time scale, and nonimmunogenic. Nevertheless, each application requires that different questions be answered. For instance, polymers studied for drug delivery have to fulfil size requirements, adequate loading and release kinetics, compatibility with the loaded drug, targeting and stimuli responsiveness mechanisms and specificity, etc. On the other hand, swelling and rheological characterization at ambient and physiological conditions are critical for injectable cell delivery polymeric vehicles. The polymerization mechanism, timing, and the elimination of the possible residues of the reaction are also critical.
This Special Issue of Polymers invites state-of-the-art reviews and original research articles discussing the latest advances in cellular and drug delivery systems that include polymeric components.

Dr. Yousof Farrag
Dr. Oreste Gualillo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • drug delivery
  • cell delivery
  • nanoparticles
  • hydrogels
  • biopolymers

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 2823 KiB  
Article
Poly(ethylene Glycol) Methyl Ether Methacrylate-Based Injectable Hydrogels: Swelling, Rheological, and In Vitro Biocompatibility Properties with ATDC5 Chondrogenic Lineage
by Yousof Farrag, Djedjiga Ait Eldjoudi, Mariam Farrag, María González-Rodríguez, Clara Ruiz-Fernández, Alfonso Cordero, María Varela-García, Carlos Torrijos Pulpón, Rebeca Bouza, Francisca Lago, Jesus Pino, Carmen Alvarez-Lorenzo and Oreste Gualillo
Polymers 2023, 15(24), 4635; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15244635 - 7 Dec 2023
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Abstract
Here, we present the synthesis of a series of chemical homopolymeric and copolymeric injectable hydrogels based on polyethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMEM) alone or with 2-dimethylamino ethyl methacrylate (DMAEM). The objective of this study was to investigate how the modification of hydrogel [...] Read more.
Here, we present the synthesis of a series of chemical homopolymeric and copolymeric injectable hydrogels based on polyethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMEM) alone or with 2-dimethylamino ethyl methacrylate (DMAEM). The objective of this study was to investigate how the modification of hydrogel components influences the swelling, rheological attributes, and in vitro biocompatibility of the hydrogels. The hydrogels’ networks were formed via free radical polymerization, as assured by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR). The swelling of the hydrogels directly correlated with the monomer and the catalyst amounts, in addition to the molecular weight of the monomer. Rheological analysis revealed that most of the synthesized hydrogels had viscoelastic and shear-thinning properties. The storage modulus and the viscosity increased by increasing the monomer and the crosslinker fraction but decreased by increasing the catalyst. MTT analysis showed no potential toxicity of the homopolymeric hydrogels, whereas the copolymeric hydrogels were toxic only at high DMEAM concentrations. The crosslinker polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) induced inflammation in ATDC5 cells, as detected by the significant increase in nitric oxide synthase type II activity. The results suggest a range of highly tunable homopolymeric and copolymeric hydrogels as candidates for cartilage regeneration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Development of Polymer-Based Materials for Cell and Drug Delivery)
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