Polysaccharide-Based Materials: Developments and Properties

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomacromolecules, Biobased and Biodegradable Polymers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2024 | Viewed by 975

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Roque Sáenz Peña 352, Bernal B1876BXD, Argentina
Interests: biopolymer materials; microbial biomass-based materials; polysaccharides; exopolysaccharides; hydrophilic films; bioactive materials; hydration; water transport; diffusion
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The utilisation of bio-based materials has emerged as an innovative alternative to those derived from non-renewable and non-biodegradable resources. In this context, the study and development of new materials are strongly centred on polysaccharides. The sources of polysaccharides are principally those from biomass, such as agricultural derivatives, as well as microorganisms and their metabolic processes capable of producing exopolysaccharides. The significant challenge ahead is to obtain polysaccharide-based materials with functional capacities comparable to those derived from synthetic polymers.

This Special Issue will cover original research and reviews related to polysaccharides and the physicochemical or biotechnological processes aimed at converting these biopolymers into materials like gels, hydrogels, and films for specialised applications, such as adhesives, adsorbents, carriers for bioactive compounds, and coatings. Additionally, it will encompass the study of their properties as well as their applications in packaging, technology, medicine, and other fields.

It is important to highlight that this Special Issue is intentionally broad in scope; therefore, we expect a substantial number of contributions that align with its focus.

Prof. Dr. Andrés Gerardo Salvay
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • polysaccharide-based material development
  • modified polysaccharide-based materials
  • polysaccharide-based materials for food packaging
  • polysaccharide-based functional and smart materials
  • polysaccharide-based material application
  • polysaccharide-based material properties
  • polysaccharide gels and hydrogels

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 1593 KiB  
Article
Lyophilized Emulsions of Thymol and Eugenol Essential Oils Encapsulated in Cellulose
by Koranit Shlosman, Dmitry M. Rein, Rotem Shemesh and Yachin Cohen
Polymers 2024, 16(10), 1422; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16101422 - 17 May 2024
Viewed by 281
Abstract
Efforts to tap into the broad antimicrobial, insecticidal, and antioxidant activities of essential oils (EOs) are limited due to their strong odor and susceptibility to light and oxidation. Encapsulation of EOs and subsequent drying overcome these limitations and extend their applications. This study [...] Read more.
Efforts to tap into the broad antimicrobial, insecticidal, and antioxidant activities of essential oils (EOs) are limited due to their strong odor and susceptibility to light and oxidation. Encapsulation of EOs and subsequent drying overcome these limitations and extend their applications. This study characterized freeze-dried (lyophilized) emulsions of eugenol (EU) and thymol (TY) EOs, encapsulated by chemically unmodified cellulose, a sustainable and low-cost resource. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy showed successful lyophilization. While the observed “flake-like” structure of the powders differed significantly from that of the emulsified microcapsules, useful properties were retained. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of EOs in their corresponding powders and thermo-gravimetric analysis demonstrated high encapsulation efficiency (87–88%), improved thermal stability and resistance to evaporation, and slow EO release rates in comparison to their free forms. The lightweight and low-cost cellulose encapsulation, together with the results showing retained properties of the dried powder, enable the use of EOs in applications requiring high temperatures, such as EO incorporation into polymer films, that can be used to protect agricultural crops from microbial infections. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polysaccharide-Based Materials: Developments and Properties)
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22 pages, 6994 KiB  
Article
Impact of Molar Composition on the Functional Properties of Glutinous Rice Starch–Chitosan Blend: Natural-Based Active Coating for Extending Mango Shelf Life
by Chawakwan Nitikornwarakul, Rodjanawan Wangpradid and Natthida Rakkapao
Polymers 2024, 16(10), 1375; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16101375 - 11 May 2024
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Abstract
This study investigates natural-based blends of glutinous rice starch (GRS) and chitosan (CS), varying their molar composition (0:100, 30:70, 50:50, 70:30, and 100:0) to explore their interaction dynamics. Our findings illustrate the versatility of these blends in solution and film forms, offering applications [...] Read more.
This study investigates natural-based blends of glutinous rice starch (GRS) and chitosan (CS), varying their molar composition (0:100, 30:70, 50:50, 70:30, and 100:0) to explore their interaction dynamics. Our findings illustrate the versatility of these blends in solution and film forms, offering applications across diverse fields. Our objective is to understand their impact on coatings designed to extend the post-harvest shelf life of mangoes. Results reveal that increasing chitosan content in GRS/CS blends enhances mechanical strength, hydrophobicity, and resistance to Colletotrichum gloeosporioides infection, a common cause of mango anthracnose. These properties overcome limitations of GRS films. Advanced techniques, including FTIR analysis and stereo imaging, confirmed robust interaction between GRS/CS blend films and mango cuticles, improving coverage with higher chitosan content. This comprehensive coverage reduces mango dehydration and respiration, thereby preserving quality and extending shelf life. Coating with a GRS/CS blend containing at least 50% chitosan effectively prevents disease progression and maintains quality over a 10-day storage period, while uncoated mangoes fail to meet quality standards within 2 days. Moreover, increasing the starch proportion in GRS/CS blends enhances film density, optical properties, and reduces reliance on acidic solvents, thereby minimizing undesirable changes in product aroma and taste. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polysaccharide-Based Materials: Developments and Properties)
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