Advanced Cellulose Polymers and Derivatives

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomacromolecules, Biobased and Biodegradable Polymers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 2925

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. UNICAP Icam Tech School, Catholic University of Pernambuco (UNICAP), Rua do Príncipe, 526, Recife 50050-900, PE, Brazil
2. Advanced Institute of Technology and Innovation (IATI), Rua Potyra, 31, Recife 50751-310, PE, Brazil
Interests: green chemical products
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Design and Communication Center, Agreste Academic Center, Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE), Av Marielle Franco, s/n-Nova Caruaru, Caruaru 50670-900, Brazil
Interests: cellulose polymers; cellulose; bacterial cellulose, design, fashion, industrial waste, requalification of textile waste; life cycle; nanomaterial; magnetic bacterial cellulose; apparel; eco friendly material

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Advanced Institute of Technology and Innovation (IATI), Rua Potyra, 31, Recife 50751-310, PE, Brazil
Interests: Bacterial cellulose; cellulose; nanocellulose; emulsions; water treatment; oil–water separation; textile materials; natural dyes; fashion; fabric; sustainability; packaging; industrial waste; Cellulose Polymers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue focuses on the remarkable potential of cellulose as a key component in sustainable and innovative solutions. As renewable and abundant raw materials, cellulose-based resources have gained significant attention due to their eco-friendly attributes and potential applications across various industries. Cellulose is an attractive alternative to fossil-based resources, offering opportunities for energy generation, industrial chemistry, and beyond. Moreover, bacterial cellulose exhibits unique characteristics and exceptional mechanical strength, making it an intriguing material for diverse applications. This Special Issue aims to explore cutting-edge research and advancements in the production, processing, and utilization of cellulose and bacterial cellulose. Contributions are sought from scholars and practitioners who have embraced an interdisciplinary approach and achieved promising results in this field. Topics of interest include novel extraction and purification techniques, sustainable synthesis methods, tailored modifications for enhanced properties, and innovative applications across sectors such as textiles, biomaterials, packaging, healthcare, and electronics. We seek to encourage the development of sustainable practices, minimizing environmental impact and promoting a circular economy. Through this Special Issue, we hope to inspire further exploration, foster collaborations, and promote sustainable practices that minimize environmental impact while embracing the transformative potential of cellulose-based materials. Moreover, we welcome contributions from practitioners who have been involved in successful public–private partnerships in the field of bacterial cellulose.

Dr. Leonie Asfora Sarubbo
Prof. Dr. Andréa Fernanda de Santana Costa
Dr. Italo José Batista Durval
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bacterial co-culture
  • kombucha
  • polymer nanocomposites
  • nanomaterials
  • membranes
  • films
  • cellulose nanocrystals
  • cellulose nanofibrils
  • hydrogel
  • properties
  • waste products
  • low-cost substrates
  • packaging
  • biomedical applications
  • fabric
  • water treatment
  • oil/water separation
  • electrical conductivity
  • alternative leather
  • wound dressing
  • eco-friendly material
  • magnetic bacterial cellulose
  • requalification of textile waste
  • sustainability

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 4992 KiB  
Article
Antimicrobial Properties of Carboxymethyl Cellulose/Starch/N’N Methylenebisacrylamide Membranes Endowed by Ultrasound and Their Potential Application in Antimicrobial Packaging
by Youliang Cheng, Xinyi Cheng, Changqing Fang, Jing Chen, Xin Zhang, Changxue Cao and Jinpeng Wang
Polymers 2024, 16(9), 1282; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16091282 - 3 May 2024
Viewed by 633
Abstract
Cellulose is used widely in antimicrobial packaging due to its abundance in nature, biodegradability, renewability, non-toxicity, and low cost. However, how efficiently and rapidly it imparts high antimicrobial activity to cellulose-based packaging materials remains a challenge. In this work, Ag NPs were deposited [...] Read more.
Cellulose is used widely in antimicrobial packaging due to its abundance in nature, biodegradability, renewability, non-toxicity, and low cost. However, how efficiently and rapidly it imparts high antimicrobial activity to cellulose-based packaging materials remains a challenge. In this work, Ag NPs were deposited on the surface of carboxymethyl cellulose/starch/N’N Methylenebisacrylamide film using ultrasonic radiation. Morphology and structure analysis of as-prepared films were conducted, and the antibacterial effects under different ultrasonic times and reductant contents were investigated. These results showed that Ag NPs were distributed uniformly on the film surface under an ultrasonic time of 45 min. The size of Ag NPs changes as the reducing agent content decreases. The composite film demonstrated a slightly better antibacterial effect against E. coli than against S. aureus. Therefore, this work can provide valuable insights for the research on antimicrobial packaging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Cellulose Polymers and Derivatives)
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12 pages, 4245 KiB  
Article
The Design of a Sustainable Industrial Wastewater Treatment System and The Generation of Biohydrogen from E. crassipes
by Uriel Fernando Carreño Sayago
Polymers 2024, 16(7), 893; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16070893 - 25 Mar 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 759
Abstract
Water scarcity is a significant global issue caused by the prolonged disregard and unsustainable management of this essential resource by both public and private bodies. The dependence on fossil fuels further exacerbates society’s bleak environmental conditions. Therefore, it is crucial to explore alternative [...] Read more.
Water scarcity is a significant global issue caused by the prolonged disregard and unsustainable management of this essential resource by both public and private bodies. The dependence on fossil fuels further exacerbates society’s bleak environmental conditions. Therefore, it is crucial to explore alternative solutions to preserve our nation’s water resources properly and promote the production of biofuels. Research into the utilization of E. crassipes to remove heavy metals and generate biofuels is extensive. The combination of these two lines of inquiry presents an excellent opportunity to achieve sustainable development goals. This study aims to develop a sustainable wastewater treatment system and generate biohydrogen from dry, pulverized E. crassipes biomass. A treatment system was implemented to treat 1 L of industrial waste. The interconnected compartment system was built by utilizing recycled PET bottles to generate biohydrogen by reusing the feedstock for the treatment process. The production of biological hydrogen through dark fermentation, using biomass containing heavy metals as a biohydrogen source, was studied. Cr (VI) and Pb (II) levels had a low impact on hydrogen production. The uncontaminated biomass of E. crassipes displayed a significantly higher hydrogen yield (81.7 mL H2/g glucose). The presence of Cr (IV) in E. crassipes leads to a decrease in biohydrogen yield by 14%, and the presence of Pb (II) in E. crassipes leads to a decrease in biohydrogen yield of 26%. This work proposes a strategy that utilizes green technologies to recover and utilize contaminated water. Additionally, it enables the production of bioenergy with high efficiency, indirectly reducing greenhouse gases. This strategy aligns with international programs for the development of a circular economy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Cellulose Polymers and Derivatives)
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Review

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18 pages, 7670 KiB  
Review
Synthesis of Iron Oxides and Influence on Final Sizes and Distribution in Bacterial Cellulose Applications
by Thaís Cavalcante de Souza, Andréa Fernanda de Santana Costa, Gloria Maria Vinhas and Leonie Asfora Sarubbo
Polymers 2023, 15(15), 3284; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15153284 - 3 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1119
Abstract
Iron oxide nanoparticles have been investigated due to their suitable characteristics for diverse applications in the fields of biomedicine, electronics, water or wastewater treatment and sensors. Maghemite, magnetite and hematite are the most widely studied iron oxide particles and have ferrimagnetic characteristics. When [...] Read more.
Iron oxide nanoparticles have been investigated due to their suitable characteristics for diverse applications in the fields of biomedicine, electronics, water or wastewater treatment and sensors. Maghemite, magnetite and hematite are the most widely studied iron oxide particles and have ferrimagnetic characteristics. When very small, however, these particles have superparamagnetic properties and are called superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). Several methods are used for the production of these particles, such as coprecipitation, thermal decomposition and microemulsion. However, the variables of the different types of synthesis must be assessed to achieve greater control over the particles produced. In some studies, it is possible to compare the influence of variations in the factors for production with each of these methods. Thus, researchers use different adaptations of synthesis based on each objective and type of application. With coprecipitation, it is possible to obtain smaller, more uniform particles with adjustments in temperature, pH and the types of reagents used in the process. With thermal decomposition, greater control is needed over the time, temperature and proportion of surfactants and organic and aqueous phases in order to produce smaller particles and a narrower size distribution. With the microemulsion process, the control of the confinement of the micelles formed during synthesis through the proportions of surfactant and oil makes the final particles smaller and less dispersed. These nanoparticles can be used as additives for the creation of new materials, such as magnetic bacterial cellulose, which has different innovative applications. Composites that have SPIONs, which are produced with greater rigour with regards to their size and distribution, have superparamagnetic properties and can be used in medical applications, whereas materials containing larger particles have ferromagnetic applications. To arrive at a particular particle with specific characteristics, researchers must be attentive to both the mechanism selected and the production variables to ensure greater quality and control of the materials produced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Cellulose Polymers and Derivatives)
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