Cellulose and Cellulose Micro/Nanomaterials: Recent Research and Applications

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomacromolecules, Biobased and Biodegradable Polymers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2024 | Viewed by 3198

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Macromolecular Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, 199004 St. Petersburg, Russia
Interests: funtional polymers; biochemical engineering; biocompatible and biodegrdable polymers; polymer composites; macroporous materials; bone tissue engineering; drug delivery; catalysis

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Guest Editor
1. Institute of Macromolecular Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Bolshoy pr. 31, 199004 St. Petersburg, Russia
2. Institute of Chemistry, Saint-Petersburg State University, Universitetsky pr. 26, 199034 St. Petersburg, Russia
Interests: bio-inspired polymers; biodegradable polymers; biopolymers; ring-opening polymerization; free radical polymerization; controlled radical polymerization; copolymers; amphiphilic copolymers; self-assembly; polymer nano-particles; macroporous polymer materials; biocomposites; polymer scaffolds
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cellulose is the world's most abundant and biorenewable polysaccharide, produced today mainly from plants. Biocompatibility, biodegradability, excellent (comparable and superior to fiberglass, Kevlar, steel) mechanical properties, the possibility of obtaining it in various forms (crystals and fibers) and suitability for modification make this polymer very attractive for a wide range of applications, especially as biomedical and environmentally friendly materials. The main area of research in the present and near future is the production and purification of cellulose from different plant and microbiological sources, its modification with small molecules or functional polymers, and its application in various biomaterials and composites.

The present Special Issue serves to report and discuss the current state of knowledge and applications in terms of polymers and materials based on cellulose and its derivatives. Topics of interest include all aspects of the production, functionalization, characterization, theoretical studies and applications of cellulose and its materials, including composites. We invite you to submit review and original articles containing the latest fundamental and applied reports and scientific results in this field.

Dr. Mariia Stepanova
Dr. Evgenia Korzhikova-Vlakh
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cellulose
  • cellulose micro- and nanocrystals
  • cellulose fibers and nanofibers
  • production
  • modification
  • physicochemical characterization
  • properties
  • applications
  • cellulose-containing composites and materials

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 2399 KiB  
Article
Fibrillar Hydrogel Based on Cellulose Nanocrystals Crosslinked via Diels–Alder Reaction: Preparation and pH-Sensitive Release of Benzocaine
by Sofia M. Morozova and Evgenia G. Korzhikova-Vlakh
Polymers 2023, 15(24), 4689; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15244689 - 13 Dec 2023
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Abstract
A fibrillar hydrogel was obtained by covalent crosslinking via Diels–Alder reaction of two types of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) with furan and maleimide groups. Gelation has been studied at various ratios of components and temperatures in the range from 20 to 60 °C. It [...] Read more.
A fibrillar hydrogel was obtained by covalent crosslinking via Diels–Alder reaction of two types of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) with furan and maleimide groups. Gelation has been studied at various ratios of components and temperatures in the range from 20 to 60 °C. It was shown that the rheological properties of the hydrogel can be optimized by varying the concentration and ratio of components. Due to the rigid structure of the CNCs, the hydrogel could be formed at a concentration of at least 5 wt%; however, it almost does not swell either in water with pH 5 or 7 or in the HBSS buffer. The introduction of aldehyde groups into the CNCs allows for the conjugation of physiologically active molecules containing primary amino groups due to the formation of imine bonds. Here, we used benzocaine as a model drug for conjugation with CNC hydrogel. The resulting drug-conjugated hydrogel demonstrated the stability of formulation at pH 7 and a pH-sensitive release of benzocaine due to the accelerated hydrolytic cleavage of the imine bond at pH < 7. The developed drug-conjugated hydrogel is promising as wound dressings for local anesthesia. Full article
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18 pages, 5400 KiB  
Article
Effect of Chemical and Steam Explosion Pulping on the Physical and Mechanical Properties of Sugarcane Straw Pulp Trays
by Kittaporn Ngiwngam, Sinchai Chinvorarat, Pornchai Rachtanapun, Rafael Auras, Thawien Wittaya and Wirongrong Tongdeesoontorn
Polymers 2023, 15(14), 3132; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15143132 - 23 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1552
Abstract
Sugarcane straw fiber (SSF) samples were prepared by chemical pulping (CP) and steam explosion (STE). CP (5, 10, 15% NaOH + 0.2% w/w anthraquinone at 121 °C for 1 h) and STE pressure (1.77, 1.96, and 2.16 MPa at 220 °C [...] Read more.
Sugarcane straw fiber (SSF) samples were prepared by chemical pulping (CP) and steam explosion (STE). CP (5, 10, 15% NaOH + 0.2% w/w anthraquinone at 121 °C for 1 h) and STE pressure (1.77, 1.96, and 2.16 MPa at 220 °C for 4 min) SSF trays were molded with a hydraulic hot-press machine at 120 °C, 7 min, and 1.72 MPa. The yield (%) of SSF from STE (54–60% dry basis (db.)) was higher than CP (32–48% db.). STE trays had greater tensile strength than CP. However, STE’s elongation and compression strength was lower than CP tray samples. The trays made from SSF using STE had less swelling in thickness, longer water wetting time, and a higher water contact angle than those made from CP. The micrographs displayed a smaller size of SSF obtained in STE than the CP. The appearance and area of peaks in ATR-FTIR spectra and XRD diffractograms, respectively, revealed that the STE trays had a larger residual lignin content from the lignin study and a lower crystallinity index than the CP trays. Moreover, the lightness values of the STE trays were lower than those of the CP trays due to lignin retention. The study results indicate that CP is the preferred method for producing SSF packaging material with high flexibility and fiber purity. However, when considering the specific SF of 4.28, the STE treatment showed superior physical and mechanical properties compared to CP. This suggests that STE could be an excellent alternative green pulping technique for producing durable biobased trays. Overall, the findings highlight the potential of STE as a viable option for obtaining trays with desirable characteristics, providing a sustainable and efficient approach to tray production. Full article
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