Polymers in Concrete and Cement

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Composites and Nanocomposites".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 September 2023) | Viewed by 5485

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering in College of Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100, China
Interests: concrete; fracture mechanics; FRP; bond performance; 3D printing
Department of Civil Engineering in College of Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100, China
Interests: structural reinforcement; bond behaviour; environmental temperature effect; FRP strengthening; utilization of solid waste resources
Department of Civil Engineering in College of Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100, China
Interests: polymers; concrete; seismic performance; prefabricated building; structural engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As one of the most commonly used building materials, concrete has been widely applied in civil engineering. However, the durability of concrete structures is gradually attracting researchers’ attention, as these structures are effective in harsher environments. It is essential to add some efficient admixtures to concrete to improve its durability. Polymers can be well used to enhance the mechanical performance of concrete and cement due to their excellent properties and compatibility with cementitious materials. Moreover, polymers can be combined with fibres to produce fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) materials. FRP is usually used as FRP bars, sheets and plates to reinforce concrete structures. It can also be made into composite structures with different shapes in structural engineering.

We are pleased to invite you to submit your research to this Special Issue focusing on polymers in concrete and cement. We encourage you to submit manuscripts on topics including, but not limited to, properties of concrete and cement with polymers, bond performance between concrete and FRP, FRP–concrete composite structures, etc.

This Special Issue has been proposed and organized primarily as a way to showcase the latest advances in polymers in concrete and cement. 

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Shutong Yang
Dr. Kun Dong
Dr. Guoxi Fan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • polymer-reinforced concrete and cement
  • fiber-reinforced polymer in concrete structures
  • composite
  • experimental analysis
  • numerical simulations
  • analytical method

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

29 pages, 11285 KiB  
Article
Study on Capillary Water Absorption of Waterborne-Polyurethane-Modified Recycled Coarse Aggregate Concrete
by Guoxi Fan, Wantong Xiang, Jing Yang, Shutong Yang and Chunping Xiang
Polymers 2023, 15(19), 3860; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15193860 - 22 Sep 2023
Viewed by 794
Abstract
The reuse of construction and demolition waste as a substitute for natural coarse aggregate in the production of recycled concrete has been widely used. In order to study the capillary water absorption performance of waterborne-polyurethane-modified recycled aggregate concrete (WPUMRC), the effects of different [...] Read more.
The reuse of construction and demolition waste as a substitute for natural coarse aggregate in the production of recycled concrete has been widely used. In order to study the capillary water absorption performance of waterborne-polyurethane-modified recycled aggregate concrete (WPUMRC), the effects of different curing systems, polymer-cement ratios, and waterborne polyurethane addition methods on the cumulative water absorption and the rate of capillary water absorption of WPUMRC were analyzed, and through MIP tests, the micro modification mechanism of waterborne polyurethane in recycled concrete was analyzed. The results indicate that the optimal curing system for both DC (waterborne polyurethane is added separately from water) and HC (waterborne polyurethane is mixed with some effective water and then added) is the 14 d standard curing—14 d indoor natural drying curing system. Waterborne polyurethane can fill the pores and micro-cracks inside WPUMRC or interweave with the hydration products of cement to form a spatial network structure, reducing the porosity, and thereby improving the capillary water absorption performance of WPUMRC. Based on the MIP test results, the grey correlation method was used to establish the relationship between capillary water absorption and the pore structure of WPUMRC under the optimal curing system. In addition, the prediction model of capillary water absorption in recycled concrete was established according to the test results, which can be used to predict WPUMRC’s capillary water absorption performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers in Concrete and Cement)
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27 pages, 10840 KiB  
Article
Experimental Evaluation of New Geopolymer Composite with Inclusion of Slag and Construction Waste Firebrick at Elevated Temperatures
by Ozer Sevim, Ilhami Demir, Erdinc Halis Alakara and İsmail Raci Bayer
Polymers 2023, 15(9), 2127; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15092127 - 29 Apr 2023
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1435
Abstract
This study investigates the effect of elevated temperatures on slag-based geopolymer composites (SGC) with the inclusion of firebrick powder (FBP). There is a limited understanding of the properties of SGC with the inclusion of FBP when exposed to elevated temperatures and the effects [...] Read more.
This study investigates the effect of elevated temperatures on slag-based geopolymer composites (SGC) with the inclusion of firebrick powder (FBP). There is a limited understanding of the properties of SGC with the inclusion of FBP when exposed to elevated temperatures and the effects of cooling processes in air and water. In this regard, in the preliminary trials performed, optimum molarity, curing temperature, and curing time conditions were determined as 16 molarity, 100 °C, and 24 h, respectively, for SGCs. Then, FBP from construction and demolition waste (CDW) was substituted in different replacement ratios (10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% by slag weight) into the SGC, with optimum molarity, curing temperature, and curing time. The produced SGC samples were exposed to elevated temperature effects at 300, 600, and 800 °C and then subjected to air- and water-cooling regimes. The ultrasonic pulse velocity, flexural strength, compressive strength, and mass loss of the SGCs with the inclusion of FBP were determined. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses were carried out for control (without FBP) and 20% FBP-based SGC cooled in air and water after elevated temperatures of 300 °C and 600 °C. The results show that the compressive and flexural strength of the SGC samples are higher than the control samples when the FBP replacement ratio is used of up to 30% for the samples after the elevated temperatures of 300 °C and 600 °C. The lowest compressive and flexural strength results were obtained for the control samples after a temperature of 800 °C. As a result, the elevated temperature resistance can be significantly improved if FBP is used in SGC by up to 30%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers in Concrete and Cement)
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13 pages, 2723 KiB  
Article
Study on Improving Measures of Mechanical Properties of Geopolymer Materials and Its Effect on CO2 Emission
by Jinqian Luo, Xiaoshuang Shi, Qingyuan Wang, Jinxin Dai, Xiang Deng and Yu Xue
Polymers 2023, 15(7), 1699; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15071699 - 29 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1037
Abstract
Using construction and demolition waste composites (CDWC) and fly ash (FA) to replace cement to produce concrete can reduce CO2 emissions. However, the CDWC-based geopolymer materials have two imperfections: the compressive strength is prone to decrease with the increase of curing age [...] Read more.
Using construction and demolition waste composites (CDWC) and fly ash (FA) to replace cement to produce concrete can reduce CO2 emissions. However, the CDWC-based geopolymer materials have two imperfections: the compressive strength is prone to decrease with the increase of curing age (strength shrinkage) under heat curing conditions, and the strength develops slowly under ambient curing conditions. To solve the problems of these materials, on the one hand, we designed an experiment of preparing CDWC-based geopolymer concrete (CDWGC) with pretreated CDWC at different high temperatures. We analyzed the influence of different pretreatment temperatures on the mechanical properties of CDWGC through compressive strength, SEM-EDS and XRD. On the other hand, we added CaO to improve the mechanical properties of CDWC-based geopolymer paste (CDWGP) under ambient curing conditions. Further, the CO2 emissions of pretreating CDWC and adding CaO were calculated by life cycle assessment (LCA). The results show that: (1) Pretreatment of CDWC can effectively solve the problem of CDWGC strength shrinkage. (2) The compressive strength of CDWGP cured at ambient can be significantly improved by adding CaO, and the compressive strength can be increased by 180.9% when the optimum content is 3%. (3) Adding CaO had less impact on CO2 emissions, a low-carbon way to improve its strength effectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers in Concrete and Cement)
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15 pages, 4105 KiB  
Article
Effect of Impact Angle on the Impact Mechanical Properties of Bionic Foamed Silicone Rubber Sandwich Structure
by Di Zhang, Hui Dong, Shouji Zhao, Wu Yan and Zhenqing Wang
Polymers 2023, 15(3), 688; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15030688 - 29 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1523
Abstract
In this paper, a red-eared slider turtle is used as the prototype for the bionic design of the foamed silicone rubber sandwich structure. The effect of impact angle on the performance of the foamed silicone rubber sandwich structure against low-velocity impact is studied [...] Read more.
In this paper, a red-eared slider turtle is used as the prototype for the bionic design of the foamed silicone rubber sandwich structure. The effect of impact angle on the performance of the foamed silicone rubber sandwich structure against low-velocity impact is studied by the finite element method. The numerical model uses the intrinsic structure model of foamed silicone rubber with porosity and the three-dimensional Hashin fiberboard damage model. The validity of the model was verified after experimental comparison. Based on the finite element simulation of different impact angles and velocities, the relationship between impact velocity and residual velocity, as well as the penetration threshold at various impact angles are obtained, and the change law of impact resistance of foamed silicone rubber sandwich structure with impact angle and velocity, as well as the damage pattern of sandwich structure at different impact angles and velocities are given. The results can provide a basis for the impact resistance design of the bionic foamed silicone rubber sandwich structure. The results show that, at a certain impact speed, the smaller the impact angle, the longer the path of the falling hammer along the plane of the sandwich structure, the lighter the damage to the sandwich structure and the greater the absorbed energy, so that avoiding the impact from the frontal side of the sandwich structure can effectively reduce the damage of the sandwich structure. When the impact angle is greater than 75°, the difference in impact resistance performance is only 2.9% compared with 90°, and the impact angle has less influence on the impact resistance performance at this time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers in Concrete and Cement)
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