Polymer Adsorption Isotherms and Kinetics

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Analysis and Characterization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 July 2022) | Viewed by 10028

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Research Fellow, HP-NTU Digital Manufacturing Corporate Lab, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore
Interests: adsorption; MOFs; adsorbent characterization; adsorption application; polymer crystallization
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Guest Editor
School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore
Interests: adsorption thermodynamics; adsorption surface science; heat and mass transfer

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Dhaka, Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh
Interests: adsorption; adsorbent characterization; energy materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Polymer adsorption has potential in solving climate change and other environmental issues. Therefore, research in polymer adsorbent materials with more adsorbate transfer receives much attention. In recent decades, further research activities have shown that both isotherms and kinetics of polymer adsorbent materials are important features for adsorption applications. On the other hand, Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) and molecular dynamics simulations show insights into evaluating and improvising both adsorption isotherms and kinetics of adsorbent materials. This Special Issue is devoted to publishing the most recent research on adsorption isotherms and kinetics of polymer adsorbent materials through either experiments or simulation.

Dr. How Wei Benjamin Teo
Dr. Anutosh Chakraborty
Dr. Mujib L. Palash
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • synthesis methods
  • polymer adsorbent
  • adsorbent modification
  • polymer adsorbent characterization
  • adsorption experiment
  • GCMC simulation
  • molecular dynamic simulation
  • adsorption isotherms and kinetics models
  • polymer composite adsorbents
  • adsorption simulation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

9 pages, 3477 KiB  
Article
The Imperative Need of Metal Salt for the Treatment of Industrial Wastewater via the Synergic Coagulation-Flocculation Method
by Bader S. Al-Anzi, Mehraj-ud-din Naik and Mudasir Ahmad
Polymers 2022, 14(9), 1651; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14091651 - 20 Apr 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1580
Abstract
Tile industry wastewater is known to contain a high concentration of TSS and turbidity resulting from various raw materials. In the present study, the effectiveness of the coagulation process on turbidity and TSS removal from Kuwait ceramic tile industry wastewater was investigated using [...] Read more.
Tile industry wastewater is known to contain a high concentration of TSS and turbidity resulting from various raw materials. In the present study, the effectiveness of the coagulation process on turbidity and TSS removal from Kuwait ceramic tile industry wastewater was investigated using ferric chloride as a coagulant. The experiments were conducted using jar tests to determine the optimum operating conditions of coagulant dosages, pH, and settling time. It was found that the coagulant dosage and medium pH greatly affect the efficiency of the coagulation process. A gradual increase in coagulant dosage from 10 to 50 mg/L increased the efficiency of turbidity removal from 95.6% to 99.5%. The efficiency of the coagulation process was also found to be dependent on pH values, where higher pH improved the efficiency of turbidity removal. It was found that a medium pH of 10, 1 h settling time, and 50 mg/L of coagulant dosage are the optimum process conditions to achieve almost complete removal of turbidity (99.5%) and TSS (99.8%). This study concluded that coagulation might be useful as a primary wastewater treatment process for tile industry wastewater. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Adsorption Isotherms and Kinetics)
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14 pages, 3650 KiB  
Article
Volume Dependence of Hydrogen Diffusion for Sorption and Desorption Processes in Cylindrical-Shaped Polymers
by Jae Kap Jung, Kyu Tae Kim, Un Bong Baek and Seung Hoon Nahm
Polymers 2022, 14(4), 756; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14040756 - 15 Feb 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1487
Abstract
In the actual application of gas transport properties under high pressure, the important factors are sample size dependence and permeation efficiency, related to gas sorption. With a modified volumetric analysis technique, we firstly measured the overall diffusion properties and equilibrium times for reaching [...] Read more.
In the actual application of gas transport properties under high pressure, the important factors are sample size dependence and permeation efficiency, related to gas sorption. With a modified volumetric analysis technique, we firstly measured the overall diffusion properties and equilibrium times for reaching the saturation of hydrogen content in both hydrogen sorption and desorption processes. The measured parameters of total uptake (C), total desorbed content (C0), diffusion coefficient in sorption (Ds), diffusion coefficient in desorption (Dd), sorption equilibrium time (ts) and desorption equilibrium time (td) of hydrogen in two polymers were determined relative to the diameter and thickness of the cylindrical-shaped polymers in the two processes. C and C0 did not demonstrate an appreciable volume dependence for all polymers. The identical values of C and C0 indicate the reversibility between sorption and desorption, which is interpreted by the occurrence of physisorption by sorbed hydrogen molecules. However, the measured diffusivity of the polymers was found to be increased with increasing thickness above 5 mm. Moreover, the larger Dd values measured in the desorption process compared to Ds may be attributed to an increased amorphous phase and volume swelling caused by increased hydrogen voids and polymer chain scission after decompression. The ts and td were found to be linearly proportional to the square of the thickness above an aspect ratio of 3.7, which was consistent with the numerical simulations based on the solution of Fick’s law. This finding could be used to predict the ts in a polymer without any measurement, depending on the sample size. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Adsorption Isotherms and Kinetics)
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13 pages, 4535 KiB  
Article
Molecular Simulation on Permeation Behavior of CH4/CO2/H2S Mixture Gas in PVDF at Service Conditions
by Houbu Li, Xuemin Zhang, Huifang Chu, Guoquan Qi, Han Ding, Xiong Gao and Jixing Meng
Polymers 2022, 14(3), 545; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14030545 - 28 Jan 2022
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 2826
Abstract
Reinforced thermoplastic composite pipes (RTPs) have been widely used for oil and gas gathering and transportation. Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) has the greatest potential as a thermoplastic liner of RTPs due to its excellent thermal and mechanical properties. However, permeation of gases is inevitable [...] Read more.
Reinforced thermoplastic composite pipes (RTPs) have been widely used for oil and gas gathering and transportation. Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) has the greatest potential as a thermoplastic liner of RTPs due to its excellent thermal and mechanical properties. However, permeation of gases is inevitable in the thermoplastic liner, which may lead to blister failure of the liner and damage the safe operation of the RTPs. In order to clarify the permeation behavior and obtain the permeation mechanism of the mixture gas (CH4/CO2/H2S) in PVDF at the normal service conditions, molecular simulations were carried out by combining the Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) method and the Molecular Dynamics (MD) method. The simulated results showed that the solubility coefficients of gases increased with the decrease in temperature and the increase in pressure. The adsorption isotherms of all gases were consistent with the Langmuir model. The order of the adsorption concentration for different gases was H2S > CO2> CH4. The isosteric heats of gases at all the actual service conditions were much less than 42 kJ/mol, which indicated that the adsorption for all the gases belonged to the physical adsorption. Both of the diffusion and permeation coefficients increased with the increase in temperature and pressure. The diffusion belonged to Einstein diffusion and the diffusion coefficients of each gas followed the order of CH4 > CO2 > H2S. During the permeation process, the adsorption of gas molecules in PVDF exhibited selective aggregation, and most of them were adsorbed in the low potential energy region of PVDF cell. The mixed-gas molecules vibrated within the hole of PVDF at relatively low temperature and pressure. As the temperature and pressure increase, the gas molecules jumped into the neighboring holes occasionally and then dwelled in the holes, moving around their equilibrium positions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Adsorption Isotherms and Kinetics)
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14 pages, 1820 KiB  
Article
Adsorption of Hydrolysed Polyacrylamide onto Calcium Carbonate
by Jin Hau Lew, Omar K. Matar, Erich A. Müller, Myo Thant Maung Maung and Paul F. Luckham
Polymers 2022, 14(3), 405; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14030405 - 20 Jan 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2995
Abstract
Carbonate rock strengthening using chemical techniques is a strategy to prevent excessive fines migration during oil and gas production. We provide herein a study of the adsorption of three types of hydrolysed polyacrylamide (HPAM) of different molecular weight (F3330S, 11–13 MDa; F3530 S, [...] Read more.
Carbonate rock strengthening using chemical techniques is a strategy to prevent excessive fines migration during oil and gas production. We provide herein a study of the adsorption of three types of hydrolysed polyacrylamide (HPAM) of different molecular weight (F3330S, 11–13 MDa; F3530 S, 15–17 MDa; F3630S, 18–20 MDa) onto calcium carbonate (CaCO3) particles via spectrophotometry using a Shimadzu UV-2600 spectrometer. The results are compared to different adsorption isotherms and kinetic models. The Langmuir isotherm shows the highest correlation coefficient (R2 > 0.97) with equilibrium parameters (RL) ranging between 0 and 1 for all three HPAMs, suggesting a favorable monolayer adsorption of HPAM onto CaCO3. The adsorption follows pseudo-second order kinetics, indicating that the interaction of HPAM with CaCO3 is largely dependent on the adsorbate concentration. An adsorption plot reveals that the amount of HPAM adsorbed onto CaCO3 at equilibrium increases with higher polymer molecular weight; the equilibrium adsorbed values for F3330S, F3530S and F3630S are approximately 0.24 mg/m2, 0.31 mg/m2, and 0.43 mg/m2, respectively. Zeta potential analysis shows that CaCO3 has a zeta potential of +12.32 mV, which transitions into negative values upon introducing HPAM. The point of zero charge (PZC) is observed at HPAM dosage between 10 to 30 ppm, in which the pH here lies between 9–10. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Adsorption Isotherms and Kinetics)
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