Polymer-Based Materials for Drug Delivery and Biomedical Applications

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomacromolecules, Biobased and Biodegradable Polymers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2024 | Viewed by 6280

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Emanuel Institute of Biochemical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119334, Russia
Interests: nano-technology; nanofabrication; encapsulation; nanoparticles; drug delivery; controlled release; targeted delivery system; cancer drug delivery; cancer drug therapy

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Guest Editor
Science Medical Centre, Saratov State University, Saratov 410012, Russia
Interests: biophysics; drug delivery systems; drugs; theranostics; microcapsules; layer-by-layer assembly; nanoparticles; enzymes; emulsions; mineral particles; magnetic nanoparticles; magneto-mechanical movement; Brillouin spectroscopy
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent decades, nature-inspired polymers have been widely applied as biomaterials due to their favourable properties, including their good biocompatibility, biodegradability, simple design and formulation of a variety of structures with tuneable characteristics. The development of drug delivery systems based on natural and synthetic polymers is rapidly emerging in different biomedical fields, such as cancer therapy, antimicrobial agents, drug delivery and others.

We are pleased to invite you to submit original papers and reviews that describe novel research as well as original techniques in the field of the fabrication, characterization and investigation of polymer-based nano- and microparticles, materials, smart polymeric materials/systems and hybrid nano-/microcomposites in drug delivery and biomedical applications.

Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following: the fabrication and functionalization of polymer-based materials and systems; characterization of chemical and physical properties, biodegradability, bioavailability, controlled drug release; polymeric carriers for drug delivery and targeted drug delivery; in vitro and in vivo assays, medical and pharmaceutical application, regenerative medicine, biomedicine, antimicrobial, theranostic and cancer application and multifunctional properties.

Authors are invited to submit their latest results. Original papers and reviews are welcome. We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Elena D. Nikolskaya
Dr. Maria Lomova
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • natural and synthetic polymers
  • polymer-based materials
  • polymer drug carriers
  • nanotechnology and nanofabrication
  • drug delivery
  • controlled drug release
  • anticancer therapy
  • antimicrobial polymer materials
  • regenerative medicine
  • multifunctional properties

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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26 pages, 2695 KiB  
Article
Electrospun Membranes Based on Quaternized Polysulfones: Rheological Properties–Electrospinning Mechanisms Relationship
by Anca Filimon, Diana Serbezeanu, Adina Maria Dobos, Mihaela Dorina Onofrei, Alexandra Bargan, Daniela Rusu and Cristina Mihaela Rimbu
Polymers 2024, 16(11), 1503; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16111503 (registering DOI) - 25 May 2024
Viewed by 93
Abstract
Composite membranes based on a polymer mixture solution of quaternized polysulfone (PSFQ), cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP), and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) for biomedical applications were successfully obtained through the electrospinning technique. To ensure the polysulfone membranes’ functionality in targeted applications, the selection of electrospinning [...] Read more.
Composite membranes based on a polymer mixture solution of quaternized polysulfone (PSFQ), cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP), and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) for biomedical applications were successfully obtained through the electrospinning technique. To ensure the polysulfone membranes’ functionality in targeted applications, the selection of electrospinning conditions was essential. Moreover, understanding the geometric characteristics and morphology of fibrous membranes is crucial in designing them to meet the performance standards necessary for future biomedical applications. Thus, the viscosity of the solutions used in the electrospinning process was determined, and the morphology of the electrospun membranes was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Investigations on the surfaces of electrospun membranes based on water vapor sorption data have demonstrated that their surface properties dictate their biological ability more than their specific surfaces. Furthermore, in order to understand the different macromolecular rearrangements of membrane structures caused by physical interactions between the polymeric chains as well as by the orientation of functional groups during the electrospinning process, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used. The applicability of composite membranes in the biomedical field was established by bacterial adhesion testing on the surface of electrospun membranes using Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus microorganisms. The biological experiments conducted establish a foundation for future applications of these membranes and validate their effectiveness in specific fields. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer-Based Materials for Drug Delivery and Biomedical Applications)
21 pages, 6866 KiB  
Article
Gamma Radiation-Mediated Synthesis of Antimicrobial Polyurethane Foam/Silver Nanoparticles
by Eduard-Marius Lungulescu, Radu Claudiu Fierascu, Miruna S. Stan, Irina Fierascu, Elena Andreea Radoi, Cristina Antonela Banciu, Raluca Augusta Gabor, Toma Fistos, Luminita Marutescu, Marcela Popa, Ionela C. Voinea, Sorina N. Voicu and Nicoleta-Oana Nicula
Polymers 2024, 16(10), 1369; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16101369 - 10 May 2024
Viewed by 515
Abstract
Nosocomial infections represent a major threat within healthcare systems worldwide, underscoring the critical need for materials with antimicrobial properties. This study presents the development of polyurethane foam embedded with silver nanoparticles (PUF/AgNPs) using a rapid, eco-friendly, in situ radiochemical synthesis method. The nanocomposites [...] Read more.
Nosocomial infections represent a major threat within healthcare systems worldwide, underscoring the critical need for materials with antimicrobial properties. This study presents the development of polyurethane foam embedded with silver nanoparticles (PUF/AgNPs) using a rapid, eco-friendly, in situ radiochemical synthesis method. The nanocomposites were characterized by UV–vis and FTIR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray technique (SEM/EDX), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), tensile and compression strengths, antimicrobial activity, and foam toxicity tests. The resulting PUF/AgNPs demonstrated prolonged stability (over 12 months) and good dispersion of AgNPs. Also, the samples presented higher levels of hardness compared to samples without AgNPs (deformation of 1682 µm for V1 vs. 4307 µm for V0, under a 5 N force), tensile and compression strength of 1.80 MPa and 0.34 Mpa, respectively. Importantly, they exhibited potent antimicrobial activity against a broad range of bacteria (including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Enterococcus faecalis) and a fungal mixture (no fungal growth on the sample surface was observed after 28 days of exposure). Furthermore, these materials were non-toxic to human keratinocytes, which kept their specific morphology after 24 h of incubation, highlighting their potential for safe use in biomedical applications. We envision promising applications for PUF/AgNPs in hospital bed mattresses and antimicrobial mats, offering a practical strategy to reduce nosocomial infections and enhance patient safety within healthcare facilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer-Based Materials for Drug Delivery and Biomedical Applications)
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22 pages, 4915 KiB  
Article
Thymol-Modified Oleic and Linoleic Acids Encapsulated in Polymeric Nanoparticles: Enhanced Bioactivity, Stability, and Biomedical Potential
by Maria B. Sokol, Vera A. Sokhraneva, Nataliya V. Groza, Mariia R. Mollaeva, Nikita G. Yabbarov, Margarita V. Chirkina, Anna A. Trufanova, Vladimir I. Popenko and Elena D. Nikolskaya
Polymers 2024, 16(1), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16010072 - 26 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1057
Abstract
Unsaturated fatty acids, such as oleic acid (OA) and linoleic acid (LA), are promising antimicrobial and cytostatic agents. We modified OA and LA with thymol (TOA and TLA, respectively) to expand their bioavailability, stability, and possible applications, and encapsulated these derivatives in polymeric [...] Read more.
Unsaturated fatty acids, such as oleic acid (OA) and linoleic acid (LA), are promising antimicrobial and cytostatic agents. We modified OA and LA with thymol (TOA and TLA, respectively) to expand their bioavailability, stability, and possible applications, and encapsulated these derivatives in polymeric nanoparticles (TOA-NPs and TLA-NPs, respectively). Prior to synthesis, we performed mathematical simulations with PASS and ADMETlab 2.0 to predict the biological activity and pharmacokinetics of TOA and TLA. TOA and TLA were synthesized via esterification in the presence of catalysts. Next, we formulated nanoparticles using the single-emulsion solvent evaporation technique. We applied dynamic light scattering, Uv-vis spectroscopy, release studies under gastrointestinal (pH 1.2–6.8) and blood environment simulation conditions (pH 7.4), and in vitro biological activity testing to characterize the nanoparticles. PASS revealed that TOA and TLA have antimicrobial and anticancer therapeutic potential. ADMETlab 2.0 provided a rationale for TOA and TLA encapsulation. The nanoparticles had an average size of 212–227 nm, with a high encapsulation efficiency (71–93%), and released TOA and TLA in a gradual and prolonged mode. TLA-NPs possessed higher antibacterial activity against B. cereus and S. aureus and pronounced cytotoxic activity against MCF-7, K562, and A549 cell lines compared to TOA-NPs. Our findings expand the biomedical application of fatty acids and provide a basis for further in vivo evaluation of designed derivatives and formulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer-Based Materials for Drug Delivery and Biomedical Applications)
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11 pages, 2931 KiB  
Article
Fabrication of a Fish-Bone-Inspired Inorganic–Organic Composite Membrane
by YuYang Jiao, Masahiro Okada, Bhingaradiya Nutan, Noriyuki Nagaoka, Ahmad Bikharudin, Randa Musa and Takuya Matsumoto
Polymers 2023, 15(20), 4190; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15204190 - 23 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1194
Abstract
Biological materials have properties like great strength and flexibility that are not present in synthetic materials. Using the ribs of crucian carp as a reference, we investigated the mechanisms behind the high mechanical properties of this rib bone, and found highly oriented layers [...] Read more.
Biological materials have properties like great strength and flexibility that are not present in synthetic materials. Using the ribs of crucian carp as a reference, we investigated the mechanisms behind the high mechanical properties of this rib bone, and found highly oriented layers of calcium phosphate (CaP) and collagen fibers. To fabricate a fish-rib-bone-mimicking membrane with similar structure and mechanical properties, this study involves (1) the rapid synthesis of plate-like CaP crystals, (2) the layering of CaP–gelatin hydrogels by gradual drying, and (3) controlling the shape of composite membranes using porous gypsum molds. Finally, as a result of optimizing the compositional ratio of CaP filler and gelatin hydrogel, a CaP filler content of 40% provided the optimal mechanical properties of toughness and stiffness similar to fish bone. Due to the rigidity, flexibility, and ease of shape control of the composite membrane materials, this membrane could be applied as a guided bone regeneration (GBR) membrane. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer-Based Materials for Drug Delivery and Biomedical Applications)
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16 pages, 5431 KiB  
Article
Chondrogenic Potential of Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Steam Sterilized Gelatin/Chitosan/Polyvinyl Alcohol Hydrogels
by Mario Alberto Pérez-Díaz, Erick Jesús Martínez-Colin, Maykel González-Torres, Carmina Ortega-Sánchez, Roberto Sánchez-Sánchez, Josselin Delgado-Meza, Fernando Machado-Bistraín, Valentín Martínez-López, David Giraldo, Érik Agustín Márquez-Gutiérrez, Jorge Armando Jiménez-Ávalos, Zaira Yunuen García-Carvajal and Yaaziel Melgarejo-Ramírez
Polymers 2023, 15(19), 3938; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15193938 - 29 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1033
Abstract
Cross-linked polymer blends from natural compounds, namely gelatin (Gel), chitosan (CS), and synthetic poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA), have received increasing scrutiny because of their versatility, biocompatibility, and ease of use for tissue engineering. Previously, Gel/CS/PVA [1:1:1] hydrogel produced via the freeze-drying process presented [...] Read more.
Cross-linked polymer blends from natural compounds, namely gelatin (Gel), chitosan (CS), and synthetic poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA), have received increasing scrutiny because of their versatility, biocompatibility, and ease of use for tissue engineering. Previously, Gel/CS/PVA [1:1:1] hydrogel produced via the freeze-drying process presented enhanced mechanical properties. This study aimed to investigate the biocompatibility and chondrogenic potential of a steam-sterilized Gel/CS/PVA hydrogel using differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (AD-hMSC) and cartilage marker expression. AD-hMSC displayed fibroblast-like morphology, 90% viability, and 69% proliferative potential. Mesenchymal profiles CD73 (98.3%), CD90 (98.6%), CD105 (97.0%), CD34 (1.11%), CD45 (0.27%), HLA-DR (0.24%); as well as multilineage potential, were confirmed. Chondrogenic differentiation of AD-hMSC in monolayer revealed the formation of cartilaginous nodules composed of glycosaminoglycans after 21 days. Compared to nonstimulated cells, hMSC-derived chondrocytes shifted the expression of CD49a from 2.82% to 40.6%, CD49e from 51.4% to 92.2%, CD54 from 9.66 to 37.2%, and CD151 from 45.1% to 75.8%. When cultured onto Gel/CS/PVA hydrogel during chondrogenic stimulation, AD-hMSC changed to polygonal morphology, and chondrogenic nodules increased by day 15, six days earlier than monolayer-differentiated cells. SEM analysis showed that hMSC-derived chondrocytes adhered to the surface with extended filopodia and abundant ECM formation. Chondrogenic nodules were positive for aggrecan and type II collagen, two of the most abundant components in cartilage. This study supports the biocompatibility of AD-hMSC onto steam-sterilized GE/CS/PVA hydrogels and its improved potential for chondrocyte differentiation. Hydrogel properties were not altered after steam sterilization, which is relevant for biosafety and biomedical purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer-Based Materials for Drug Delivery and Biomedical Applications)
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Review

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15 pages, 2189 KiB  
Review
Reverse Engineering and 3D Printing of Medical Devices for Drug Delivery and Drug-Embedded Anatomic Implants
by Anusha Elumalai, Yash Nayak, Aravinda K. Ganapathy, David Chen, Karthik Tappa, Udayabhanu Jammalamadaka, Grace Bishop and David H. Ballard
Polymers 2023, 15(21), 4306; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15214306 - 2 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1464
Abstract
In recent years, 3D printing (3DP) has advanced traditional medical treatments. This review explores the fusion of reverse engineering and 3D printing of medical implants, with a specific focus on drug delivery applications. The potential for 3D printing technology to create patient-specific implants [...] Read more.
In recent years, 3D printing (3DP) has advanced traditional medical treatments. This review explores the fusion of reverse engineering and 3D printing of medical implants, with a specific focus on drug delivery applications. The potential for 3D printing technology to create patient-specific implants and intricate anatomical models is discussed, along with its ability to address challenges in medical treatment. The article summarizes the current landscape, challenges, benefits, and emerging trends of using 3D-printed formulations for medical implantation and drug delivery purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer-Based Materials for Drug Delivery and Biomedical Applications)
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