Carbohydrate Biopolymers

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomacromolecules, Biobased and Biodegradable Polymers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 2596

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Marine Bioresources and Environment, Jiangsu Ocean University, Lianyungang 222005, China
2. Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Marine Biotechnology, Jiangsu Ocean University, Lianyungang 222005, China
Interests: food; feed; carbohydrates; protein

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Guest Editor
School of Food Science and Engineering, Jiangsu Ocean University, Lianyungang, China
Interests: food; feed; carbohydrates; protein

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Marine Bioresources and Environment, Jiangsu Ocean University, Lianyungang, China
Interests: food; feed; carbohydrates; protein

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Marine Bioresources and Environment, Jiangsu Ocean University, 59 Cangwu Road, Haizhou, China
2. Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Marine Biotechnology, Jiangsu Ocean University, 59 Cangwu Road, Haizhou, China
Interests: food; feed; carbohydrates; edible insect

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are delighted to open this Special Issue, entitled “Carbohydrate Biopolymers”.

Typical carbohydrate biopolymers include animal carbohydrates (e.g., chitin, chitosan, chondroitin sulfate, hyaluronic acid), plant carbohydrates (e.g., starch, cellulose, seed gum, resin gum, plant extract gum) and microbial carbohydrates (e.g., xanthan gum, gellan gum, pullulan), as well as their related oligosaccharides derived from degradation biotechnology. Compared with synthetic plastics, carbohydrate biopolymers have the advantages of biocompatibility, biodegradability and sustainability. These carbohydrate biopolymers can be fabricated into functional materials such as films, coatings, gels, fibers, particles, or composites, and are widely used for different applications, including in the food industry, pharmaceutical industry and chemical industry.

The aim of this Special Issue is to discuss their extraction, purification, characterization, manufacturing, as well as their various applications in biomedical and green industry fields. We cordially invite you to contribute to the themed issue. Both original research and review articles are highly welcome.

Prof. Dr. Saikun Pan
Prof. Dr. Junjie Zhang
Prof. Dr. Rui Duan
Dr. Shengjun Wu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • carbohydrate biopolymer
  • carbohydrate film, coating, fiber and gel
  • biomacromolecules and functional materials
  • polymer characterization
  • carbohydrate properties

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 4091 KiB  
Article
A Novel Nanofiber Hydrogel Adhesive Based on Carboxymethyl Cellulose Modified by Adenine and Thymine
by Chong Xie, Runde Yang, Xing Wan, Haorong Li, Liangyao Ge, Xiaofeng Li and Guanglei Zhao
Polymers 2024, 16(7), 1008; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16071008 - 7 Apr 2024
Viewed by 564
Abstract
Natural polymer-based adhesive hydrogels have garnered significant interest for their outstanding strength and versatile applications, in addition to being eco-friendly. However, the adhesive capabilities of purely natural products are suboptimal, which hampers their practical use. To address this, we engineered carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) [...] Read more.
Natural polymer-based adhesive hydrogels have garnered significant interest for their outstanding strength and versatile applications, in addition to being eco-friendly. However, the adhesive capabilities of purely natural products are suboptimal, which hampers their practical use. To address this, we engineered carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) surfaces with complementary bases, adenine (A) and thymine (T), to facilitate the self-assembly of adhesive hydrogels (CMC-AT) with a nanofiber configuration. Impressively, the shear adhesive strength reached up to 6.49 MPa with a mere 2% adhesive concentration. Building upon this innovation, we conducted a comparative analysis of the shear adhesion properties between CMC and CMC-AT hydrogel adhesives when applied to delignified and non-delignified wood chips. We examined the interplay between the adhesives and the substrate, as well as the role of mechanical interlocking in overall adhesion performance. Our findings offer a fresh perspective on the development of new biodegradable polymer hydrogel adhesives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbohydrate Biopolymers)
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12 pages, 5235 KiB  
Article
Wound Dressing Double-Crosslinked Quick Self-Healing Hydrogel Based on Carboxymethyl Chitosan and Modified Nanocellulose
by Anshan Huang, Yehong Chen and Chaojun Wu
Polymers 2023, 15(16), 3389; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15163389 - 13 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1548
Abstract
The use of hydrogels in wound dressings, which is pivotal for effective wound treatment, has been widely applied to diverse medical wound conditions. However, formulating natural hydrogels that combine robust strength and self-healing capabilities is a significant challenge. To overcome this, we successfully [...] Read more.
The use of hydrogels in wound dressings, which is pivotal for effective wound treatment, has been widely applied to diverse medical wound conditions. However, formulating natural hydrogels that combine robust strength and self-healing capabilities is a significant challenge. To overcome this, we successfully designed a natural nanocellulose self-healing hydrogel that can quickly self-heal and restore the complete hydrogel structure after injury to fill the injured area and protect the wound from external damage. Our study utilized modified natural polymer carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC), hydrazide-modified carboxymethyl cellulose nanofibers (HCNF), and cellulose nanocrystals modified by dialdehyde (DACNC) to fabricate the hydrogel. The amides containing more amino groups and HCNF in CMC can be used as cross-linking nodes, and the high aspect ratio and specific surface area of DACNC are favorable for the connection of many active hydrogels. The hydrogel is crosslinked by the dynamic imide bond and hydrazone bond between the amino group of CMC, the amide of HCNF, and the aldehyde of DACNC and has a double network structure. These connections can be readily reassembled when disrupted, enabling fast self-healing of hydrogels within five minutes. Moreover, HCNF and DACNC were incorporated as nano-reinforced fillers to bolster the hydrogel’s strength while preserving its high liquid absorption capacity (381% equilibrium swelling rate). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbohydrate Biopolymers)
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