New Advancements for Bioactive Biomedical Polymers

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomacromolecules, Biobased and Biodegradable Polymers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2023) | Viewed by 12096

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, University of Pisa, L.go Lucio Lazzarino 2, 56126, Pisa, Italy
Interests: (bio)materials science and technology; multiscale modeling; mechanics of acoustics; bioenngineering; mechatronics; industrial robotics
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Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, University of Pisa, Largo L. Lazzarino 2, 56122 Pisa, Italy
Interests: biomaterials; biopolymers; piezoelectric materials; smart tissue engineering; nanofabrication; drug delivery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biomedical polymers are key actors in patients’ care for a number of diseases, as they allow interaction with biofluids, fabrication of medical devices and prostheses, and controlled release of drugs and bioactive molecules, as well as other special properties, such as biodegradation, biocompatibility, and the ability to be fabricated in multiple shapes. Recently, as the techniques for manufacturing polymers and composites are evolving into more sophisticated options (e.g., multi-material, multidrug, high resolution, CAD-CAM, integrated systems), biomedical polymers have started to benefit from new opportunities to bring improved diagnosis and treatments to the patients. 

This special issue focuses on forefront developments of polymer-based materials with enhanced properties (e.g., chemical, physical, mechanical, biological), intended for application in biomedical devices, including, but not limited to, prostheses and functional coatings. This collection also aims to cover different emerging fabrication and post-treatment technologies for biomedical polymers, such as 3D printing, electrospinning, and electrospray, among others. Investigations on polymers incorporating different bioactive molecules, both synthetic and natural origin, along with demonstration of their specific effects (e.g., cell differentiation, antimicrobial, antiviral, immune-stimulatory/modulatory, anticarcinogenic, or others) in vitro or in vivo are very suitable for this Special Issue. Eventually, research integrating new tools such as computer modeling or artificial intelligence to predict or optimize the performance of the materials, technologies, and devices will be most appreciated to unveil the future advancements of biomedical polymers. Research and review papers are welcome.

Dr. Serena Danti
Dr. Mario Milazzo
Dr. Bahareh Azimi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomedical
  • biomaterial
  • biopolymer
  • biomolecule
  • bioactive
  • biodegradable
  • polymer composite
  • biocompatibility
  • electrospinning
  • 3d printing
  • electrospray
  • coating
  • device
  • prosthesis
  • functional
  • in vitro
  • in vivo

Published Papers (3 papers)

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18 pages, 8646 KiB  
Article
A Straightforward Method to Produce Multi-Nanodrug Delivery Systems for Transdermal/Tympanic Patches Using Electrospinning and Electrospray
by Bahareh Azimi, Claudio Ricci, Teresa Macchi, Cemre Günday, Sara Munafò, Homa Maleki, Federico Pratesi, Veronika Tempesti, Caterina Cristallini, Luca Bruschini, Andrea Lazzeri, Serena Danti and Nazende Günday-Türeli
Polymers 2023, 15(17), 3494; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15173494 - 22 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1343
Abstract
The delivery of drugs through the skin barrier at a predetermined rate is the aim of transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDSs). However, so far, TDDS has not fully attained its potential as an alternative to hypodermic injections and oral delivery. In this study, [...] Read more.
The delivery of drugs through the skin barrier at a predetermined rate is the aim of transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDSs). However, so far, TDDS has not fully attained its potential as an alternative to hypodermic injections and oral delivery. In this study, we presented a proof of concept of a dual drug-loaded patch made of nanoparticles (NPs) and ultrafine fibers fabricated by using one equipment, i.e., the electrospinning apparatus. Such NP/fiber systems can be useful to release drugs locally through the skin and the tympanic membrane. Briefly, dexamethasone (DEX)-loaded poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBHV) fiber meshes were decorated with rhodamine (RHO)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs, with RHO representing as a second drug model. By properly tuning the working parameters of electrospinning, DEX-loaded PHBHV fibers (i.e., by electrospinning mode) and RHO-loaded PLGA NPs (i.e., by electrospray mode) were successfully prepared and straightforwardly assembled to form a TDDS patch, which was characterized via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and dynamometry. The patch was then tested in vitro using human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). The incorporation of DEX significantly reduced the fiber mesh stiffness. In vitro tests showed that HDFs were viable for 8 days in contact with drug-loaded samples, and significant signs of cytotoxicity were not highlighted. Finally, thanks to a beaded structure of the fibers, a controlled release of DEX from the electrospun patch was obtained over 4 weeks, which may accomplish the therapeutic objective of a local, sustained and prolonged anti-inflammatory action of a TDDS, as is requested in chronic inflammatory conditions, and other pathological conditions, such as in sudden sensorineural hearing loss treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advancements for Bioactive Biomedical Polymers)
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14 pages, 2079 KiB  
Article
Local Piezoelectric Response of Polymer/Ceramic Nanocomposite Fibers
by Aurora Magnani, Simone Capaccioli, Bahareh Azimi, Serena Danti and Massimiliano Labardi
Polymers 2022, 14(24), 5379; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14245379 - 8 Dec 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1756
Abstract
Effective converse piezoelectric coefficient (d33,eff) mapping of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) nanofibers with ceramic BaTiO3 nanoparticle inclusions obtained by electrospinning was carried out by piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) in a peculiar dynamic mode, namely constant-excitation frequency-modulation (CE-FM), particularly suitable for [...] Read more.
Effective converse piezoelectric coefficient (d33,eff) mapping of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) nanofibers with ceramic BaTiO3 nanoparticle inclusions obtained by electrospinning was carried out by piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) in a peculiar dynamic mode, namely constant-excitation frequency-modulation (CE-FM), particularly suitable for the analysis of compliant materials. Mapping of single nanocomposite fibers was carried out to demonstrate the ability of CE-FM-PFM to investigate the nanostructure of semicrystalline polymers well above their glass transition temperature, such as PVDF, by revealing the distribution of piezoelectric activity of the nanofiber, as well as of the embedded nanoparticles employed. A decreased piezoelectric activity at the nanoparticle site compared to the polymeric fiber was found. This evidence can be rationalized in terms of a tradeoff between the dielectric constants and piezoelectric coefficients of the component materials, as well as on the mutual orientation of polar axes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advancements for Bioactive Biomedical Polymers)
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40 pages, 4348 KiB  
Systematic Review
Physical and Mechanical Properties of 3D-Printed Provisional Crowns and Fixed Dental Prosthesis Resins Compared to CAD/CAM Milled and Conventional Provisional Resins: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Saurabh Jain, Mohammed E. Sayed, Mallika Shetty, Saeed M. Alqahtani, Mohammed Hussain Dafer Al Wadei, Shilpi Gilra Gupta, Ahlam Abdulsalam Ahmed Othman, Abdulkarim Hussain Alshehri, Hatem Alqarni, Abdulaziz Hussain Mobarki, Khalid Motlaq, Haifa F. Bakmani, Asma A. Zain, Abdullah J. Hakami and Moayad F. Sheayria
Polymers 2022, 14(13), 2691; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14132691 - 30 Jun 2022
Cited by 45 | Viewed by 7724
Abstract
Newly introduced provisional crowns and fixed dental prostheses (FDP) materials should exhibit good physical and mechanical properties necessary to serve the purpose of their fabrication. The aim of this systematic literature review and meta-analysis is to evaluate the articles comparing the physical and [...] Read more.
Newly introduced provisional crowns and fixed dental prostheses (FDP) materials should exhibit good physical and mechanical properties necessary to serve the purpose of their fabrication. The aim of this systematic literature review and meta-analysis is to evaluate the articles comparing the physical and mechanical properties of 3D-printed provisional crown and FDP resin materials with CAD/CAM (Computer-Aided Designing/Computer-Aided Manufacturing) milled and conventional provisional resins. Indexed English literature up to April 2022 was systematically searched for articles using the following electronic databases: MEDLINE-PubMed, Web of Science (core collection), Scopus, and the Cochrane library. This systematic review was structured based on the guidelines given by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). The focused PICO/PECO (Participant, Intervention/exposure, Comparison, Outcome) question was: ‘Do 3D-printed (P) provisional crowns and FDPs (I) have similar physical and mechanical properties (O) when compared to CAD/CAM milled and other conventionally fabricated ones (C)’. Out of eight hundred and ninety-six titles, which were recognized after a primary search, twenty-five articles were included in the qualitative analysis, and their quality analysis was performed using the modified CONSORT scale. Due to the heterogeneity of the studies, only twelve articles were included for quantitative analysis. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that 3D-printed provisional crown and FDP resin materials have superior mechanical properties but inferior physical properties compared to CAD/CAM milled and other conventionally fabricated ones. Three-dimensionally printed provisional crowns and FDP materials can be used as an alternative to conventional and CAD/CAM milled long-term provisional materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advancements for Bioactive Biomedical Polymers)
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