Eco-Friendly Polymers: Structure, Modification and Processing

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomacromolecules, Biobased and Biodegradable Polymers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2024 | Viewed by 1367

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Wood Technology, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, Poznan University of Life Sciences, 60-627 Poznan, Poland
Interests: wood sciences and technology; wood-based materials; lignocellulosic composites; adhesives; adhesive modification; bio-based adhesives; formaldehyde emission
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Wood Technology, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, Poznan University of Life Sciences, Poznan, Poland
Interests: glulam beams; adhesives; wood-based materials; mechanical properties; timber properties; wood defects
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Emerging discoveries in the field of materials engineering are often determinants of technological progress in today's world. Although synthetic polymers are still very popular, their synthesis and further processing pose a great challenge in the light of growing public awareness of environmental issues. Consequently, materials made from renewable sources have gained significant attention in recent decades for their potential to replace polymers from petroleum sources. Materials produced from natural components have a long history dating back to ancient times and have accompanied humans at every stage of civilization. Nowadays, solutions are constantly being proposed, which has led to the creation of bio-based materials, products and entire technologies that have a much lower environmental impact. The development of eco-friendly materials also allows for much more effective waste management. These residues can be applied, for example, as various types of fillers to improve the properties of existing polymer-based products. Overall, the implementation of “eco-friendly” solutions is widely considered an important strategy in the field of materials engineering, allowing the development of promising materials that constitute an alternative to existing synthetic materials. Therefore, this Special Issue aims to present the latest research on the structure, modification and processing of environmentally friendly polymeric materials.

We are pleased to invite you to submit a manuscript to this Special Issue. Full articles, communications and reviews are welcome.

We look forward to receiving your contributions. 

Kind regards,
Dr. Dorota Dukarska
Dr. Jakub Kawalerczyk
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable polymers
  • bio-based polymer materials
  • eco-friendly adhesives
  • natural filler
  • biodegradable polymers
  • bio-composite materials
  • bio-based hybrid polymer composites
  • biopolymer-based nanocomposites
  • sustainable innovations in bio-based polymer materials
  • green composites
  • biomass-derived polymers
  • technologies for environmentally friendly polymer processing
  • bio-based polymer structure and modification
  • processing of eco-friendly polymers
  • eco-friendly polymers in wood-based material production
  • bio-based coating for wood and wood-based materials
  • bio-based polymers for wood preservation
  • environmental engineering of eco-friendly materials

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 1898 KiB  
Article
Modified Buckwheat Husk as a Filler for Urea–Formaldehyde Resin in Plywood Production
by Jakub Kawalerczyk, Joanna Walkiewicz, Ján Sedliačik, Dorota Dukarska, Magdalena Woźniak and Radosław Mirski
Polymers 2024, 16(10), 1350; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16101350 - 10 May 2024
Viewed by 628
Abstract
The aim of the presented research was to determine the suitability of both non-modified and modified buckwheat husk (BH) as a filler for urea–formaldehyde adhesive in plywood production. The effect of two modification methods, acetylation and silanization, was investigated. Infrared spectroscopy outcomes confirmed [...] Read more.
The aim of the presented research was to determine the suitability of both non-modified and modified buckwheat husk (BH) as a filler for urea–formaldehyde adhesive in plywood production. The effect of two modification methods, acetylation and silanization, was investigated. Infrared spectroscopy outcomes confirmed that both acetylation and silanization of the filler had occurred. Based on the results, it was found that the introduction of BH had a significant effect on both the adhesive properties and the characteristics of the manufactured plywood. The application of non-modified husks led to a reduction in viscosity and an extension of the gelation time, and the produced plywood boards were characterized by reduced bonding quality and increased delamination. Modification of the husk surface by acetylation and silanization with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane contributed to the noticeable improvement in the resin properties. On the other hand, the improvement in plywood properties, consisting of the increase in bonding quality and reduced delamination, was observed only in the case of the silanized husk. Furthermore, the use of non-modified and acetylated husk did not significantly influence the formaldehyde emission. The reduction in the investigated emission of formaldehyde was observed only in the case of variants containing 15 and 20% of silanized buckwheat husk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eco-Friendly Polymers: Structure, Modification and Processing)
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12 pages, 2635 KiB  
Article
Possibility of Using Wind Turbine Waste in Particleboard Manufacturing
by Adam Derkowski, Dorota Dziurka, Ryszard Antonowicz, Monika Chuda-Kowalska and Radoslaw Mirski
Polymers 2024, 16(9), 1210; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16091210 - 26 Apr 2024
Viewed by 528
Abstract
Recent reports indicate that the development of electricity generation using wind turbines will continue to grow. Despite the long service life of wind turbine blades, their technological life comes to an end at a certain point. Currently, there is no industrial method for [...] Read more.
Recent reports indicate that the development of electricity generation using wind turbines will continue to grow. Despite the long service life of wind turbine blades, their technological life comes to an end at a certain point. Currently, there is no industrial method for recycling them, and the proposed solutions need to consider a complete and comprehensive approach to this material. In many countries, these blades are stored in special landfills and await proposals for rational recycling. It has been proposed that this recyclable yet still troublesome raw material be used in building sheathing boards. Sheathing boards used in the construction industry have a relatively long lifecycle. Three types of polymer chips and two resins, i.e., PF and MUF, were used in the study. The boards’ quality was assessed per the standards specified for particle boards. The resulting boards were characterized by strengths above 20 N/mm2 and an elastic modulus close to 4000 N/mm2. Slightly better results were obtained with the MUF resin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eco-Friendly Polymers: Structure, Modification and Processing)
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