Bio-Based Polymeric Films II

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Membranes and Films".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 1442

Special Issue Editors

Department of Food Technology and Nutrition, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara 144411, India
Interests: biomaterials; edible film and coatings; nanoemulsion; natural compound; active food packaging; smart packaging materials; food shelf life
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Guest Editor
BioNanocomposite Research Center, Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Interests: sustainable biopolymers; bionanocomposite materials; antibacterial food packaging; active food packaging
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The massive consumer demands for short-term single-use plastic materials in recent years have produced huge plastic waste, which in turn has created tremendous environmental pollution. The worldwide production of plastics is now at ~400 million tons per year, and it is expected to increase to ~1800 million tons by 2050. In this context, there is an urgent necessity for cost-effective and advanced recycling technology to solve this packaging waste problem. Another solution is the use of environmentally friendly green composites using biodegradable and renewable materials instead of non-biodegradable synthetic plastics to reduce the plastic waste problem. Accordingly, biodegradable polymers or biopolymers can be used to develop alternatives to synthetic petroleum-based plastics. Different sources of biopolymers, such as carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids, as well as biodegradable polymers such as polyesters, polyamides, polyurethanes, etc., have recently been utilized to make environmentally benign biodegradable plastic. Hence, to reduce the plastic waste problem, biobased biodegradable polymers can be a replacement for synthetic petroleum-based plastic.

The primary purpose of this Special Issue is to assemble the results regarding the preparation and characterization of biodegradable polymer-based composite films for potential applications in packaging and other fields of interest.

Dr. Swarup Roy
Dr. Jong-Whan Rhim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 4456 KiB  
Article
TEMPO-Oxidized Nanocellulose Films Modified by Tea Saponin Derived from Camellia oleifera: Physicochemical, Mechanical, and Antibacterial Properties
by Nan Jiang, Yudi Hu and Yuhang Cheng
Polymers 2024, 16(7), 1016; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16071016 - 08 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Nanocellulose materials have been widely used in biomedicine, food packaging, aerospace, composite material, and other fields. In this work, cellulose obtained from Camellia shells through alkali boiling and subbleaching was micro-dissolved and regenerated using the DMAc (N,N-Dimethylacetamide)/LiCl system, and [...] Read more.
Nanocellulose materials have been widely used in biomedicine, food packaging, aerospace, composite material, and other fields. In this work, cellulose obtained from Camellia shells through alkali boiling and subbleaching was micro-dissolved and regenerated using the DMAc (N,N-Dimethylacetamide)/LiCl system, and TOCNs (TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers) with different degrees of oxidation. The membrane was prepared by filtration of polytetrafluoroethylene (pore size 0.1 μm), and the oxidized nanocellulose film was obtained after drying, Then, the crystallinity, mechanical properties and oxygen barrier properties of the TOCN film were investigated. Furthermore, based on TS (tea saponin) from Camellia oleifera seed cake and TOCNs, TS-TOCN film was prepared by the heterogeneous reaction. The TS-TOCN film not only shows excellent oxygen barrier properties (the oxygen permeability is 2.88 cc·m−2·d−1) but also has good antibacterial effects on both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The antibacterial property is comparable to ZnO-TOCN with the same antibacterial content prepared by the in-situ deposition method. Antioxidant activity tests in vitro showed that TS-TOCN had a significant scavenging effect on DPPH (2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radicals. This design strategy makes it possible for inexpensive and abundant Camellia oleifera remainders to be widely used in the field of biobased materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bio-Based Polymeric Films II)
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Review

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26 pages, 1276 KiB  
Review
Recent Progress of Carrageenan-Based Composite Films in Active and Intelligent Food Packaging Applications
by Bharath Kokkuvayil Ramadas, Jong-Whan Rhim and Swarup Roy
Polymers 2024, 16(7), 1001; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16071001 - 06 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Recently, as concerns about petrochemical-derived polymers increase, interest in biopolymer-based materials is increasing. Undoubtedly, biopolymers are a better alternative to solve the problem of synthetic polymer-based plastics for packaging purposes. There are various types of biopolymers in nature, and mostly polysaccharides are used [...] Read more.
Recently, as concerns about petrochemical-derived polymers increase, interest in biopolymer-based materials is increasing. Undoubtedly, biopolymers are a better alternative to solve the problem of synthetic polymer-based plastics for packaging purposes. There are various types of biopolymers in nature, and mostly polysaccharides are used in this regard. Carrageenan is a hydrophilic polysaccharide extracted from red algae and has recently attracted great interest in the development of food packaging films. Carrageenan is known for its excellent film-forming properties, high compatibility and good carrier properties. Carrageenan is readily available and low cost, making it a good candidate as a polymer matrix base material for active and intelligent food packaging films. The carrageenan-based packaging film lacks mechanical, barrier, and functional properties. Thus, the physical and functional properties of carrageenan-based films can be enhanced by blending this biopolymer with functional compounds and nanofillers. Various types of bioactive ingredients, such as nanoparticles, natural extracts, colorants, and essential oils, have been incorporated into the carrageenan-based film. Carrageenan-based functional packaging film was found to be useful for extending the shelf life of packaged foods and tracking spoilage. Recently, there has been plenty of research work published on the potential of carrageenan-based packaging film. Therefore, this review discusses recent advances in carrageenan-based films for applications in food packaging. The preparation and properties of carrageenan-based packaging films were discussed, as well as their application in real-time food packaging. The latest discussion on the potential of carrageenan as an alternative to traditionally used synthetic plastics may be helpful for further research in this field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bio-Based Polymeric Films II)
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