Functional Polymers for Construction Purposes

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Smart and Functional Polymers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2024 | Viewed by 2195

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Technology and Environmental Analytics, Cracow University of Technology, 31-155 Cracow, Poland
Interests: building materials composites; waste cooking oil; polymerization; waste management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The construction industry is one of the rapidly developing sectors of the economy, but at the same time, it poses a challenge in terms of sustainable development. It is responsible for the enormous consumption of global energy and natural resources. Additionally, it generates large amounts of waste and greenhouse gas emissions, primarily due to the widespread use of commercial cement-based products, which have a significant impact on the environment.

In response to these issues, the search for alternative building materials with high-strength parameters and environmentally friendly characteristics is gaining increasing importance. In this context, functional polymers are gaining popularity, finding applications in the construction industry.

Functional polymers are materials that possess unique properties such as mechanical strength, flexibility, resistance to weathering, and fire resistance. Their use in construction can bring numerous benefits both to the environment and to the energy efficiency of buildings.

One advantage of functional polymers is the ability to produce them using renewable resources, which contributes to reducing dependence on inefficient and limited natural resources. Furthermore, some of these polymers can be easily processed and recycled, allowing for a reduction in construction waste generation.

Additionally, functional polymers can be used to enhance the energy efficiency of buildings. For example, polymers with insulation properties can reduce heat losses through walls and roofs, resulting in lower energy consumption when heating or cooling. The possibility of using these polymers as solar-reflective coatings also contributes to reducing energy consumption in buildings.

Dr. Anita Staroń
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • construction industry
  • sustainable development
  • functional polymers
  • environmental impact
  • energy efficiency
  • renewable resources
  • waste reduction
  • composites
  • green polymers

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 4800 KiB  
Article
Interfacial Bond Properties of Underwater Concrete Coated with Bisphenol A Epoxy Resins
by Sungwon Kim, Jin-Hak Yi, Hyemin Hong, Seoung Ik Choi, Dongchan Kim and Min Ook Kim
Polymers 2023, 15(21), 4290; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15214290 - 1 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 946
Abstract
This study investigated changes in the interfacial properties of epoxy-coated concrete exposed to various conditions, regarding the epoxy type, coating equipment, and exposure environment and period. The measured coating thickness and pull-off bond strength exhibited diverse trends, depending on the exposure period and [...] Read more.
This study investigated changes in the interfacial properties of epoxy-coated concrete exposed to various conditions, regarding the epoxy type, coating equipment, and exposure environment and period. The measured coating thickness and pull-off bond strength exhibited diverse trends, depending on the exposure period and conditions. In the real sea (RS) environment, the average bond strengths for bisphenol A (BPA) (E1), BPA with zinc powder (E2), and BPA with cresyl glycidyl ether (E3) were 1.26, 1.93, and 1.92 MPa, respectively. The coating method did not significantly affect the measured coating thickness and strength values. The conventional roller (D1) exhibited the highest thickness variation, with a value of 214.45 μm. The RS condition significantly increased the coating thickness (34% to 158%) compared to the tap water (TW) condition. The exposure conditions had little impact on bond strength except for E3, which showed an increased strength (2.71 MPa) over 7–91 days, especially under RS conditions, while E2 remained constant at approximately 1.82 MPa. This study offers insights into factors influencing marine concrete coating performance and discusses limitations and future work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Polymers for Construction Purposes)
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15 pages, 4040 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Polycaprolactone Applicability for Manufacturing High-Performance Cellulose Nanocrystal Cement Composites
by Hyungjoo Lee and Woosuk Kim
Polymers 2023, 15(16), 3358; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15163358 - 10 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 962
Abstract
This experimental study examined the aplication effect of polycaprolactone (PCL), an organic resin material with excellent elasticity and ductility, on improving the mechanical performance of cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) cement composites. PCL was compared according to its shape, and in the case of Granules, [...] Read more.
This experimental study examined the aplication effect of polycaprolactone (PCL), an organic resin material with excellent elasticity and ductility, on improving the mechanical performance of cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) cement composites. PCL was compared according to its shape, and in the case of Granules, which is the basic shape, interfacial adhesion with cement was not achieved, so a dichloromethane (DCM) solution was used to dissolve and use the Granules form. As a method for bonding PCL to the CNC surface, the CNC surface was modified using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), and surface silylation was confirmed through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis. In order to evaluate the dispersibility according to the application of PCL to the modified CNC, particle size analysis (PSA) and zeta potential analysis were performed according to the PCL mixing ratio. Through the PSA and zeta potential values, the highest dispersion stability was shown at 1 vol.%, the cohesive force of CNC was low, and the dispersion stability was high according to the application of PCL. According to the results of the dispersion stability evaluation, the degree of hydration of the dissolved PCL 1 vol.%, CNC-only specimens, and plain specimens were analyzed. CNC acted as a water channel inside the cement to accelerate hydration in the non-hydrated area, resulting in an increased degree of hydration. However, the incorporation of PCL showed a low degree of hydration, and the analysis of strength characteristics also showed a decrease of approximately 27% compared with that of plain specimens. This was because the bonding with SiO2 was not smooth owing to the solvent, thus affecting internal hydration. In order to investigate the effect of the PCL shape, the compressive and flexural strength characteristics were compared using PCL powder as an additional parameter. The compressive strength and flexural strength were improved by about 54% and 26%, respectively, in the PCL powder 15 wt% specimen compared to the general specimen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis confirmed that the filler effect, which made the microporous structure denser, affects the mechanical performance improvement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Polymers for Construction Purposes)
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