Plant Bioprotection

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Protection and Biotic Interactions".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 February 2023) | Viewed by 4817

Special Issue Editors

Research Unit Induced Resistance and Plant Bioprotection, University of Reims, EA 4707 USC INRAe 1488, SFR Condorcet FR CNRS 3417, 51100 Reims, France
Interests: plant-microbe interaction; stress physiology plants responses to biotic and abiotic stress; crop protection; biological control
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Research Unit Induced Resistance and Plant Bioprotection, University of Reims, EA 4707 USC INRAe 1488, SFR Condorcet FR CNRS 3417, 51100 Reims, France
Interests: physiology; plant microbe interaction; carbon metabolism
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Research Unit Induced Resistance and Plant Bioprotection, SFR Condorcet FR CNRS 3417, Faculty of Sciences, University of Reims, PO Box. 1039, CEDEX 02, 51687 Reims, France
Interests: plant response to biotic and abiotic stress; stimulation of plant defenses; defense metabolites; biocontrol of plant disease; cell culture; green biotechnology; bioproduction of plant defense metabolites
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A central element of the Green Deal is the need to shift to a more sustainable agriculture that reduces the environmental footprint of farming while maintaining efficient productive, social, eco-friendly, healthy, and cost-effective agriculture. Unfortunately, the protection of crops and trees is still mainly provided today through the extensive use of synthetic pesticides and chemical agents. These have proven their protective effectiveness but at the cost of negative consequences on the environment and human health. Finding alternative and/or complementary solutions should allow agriculture to cross a threshold in terms of innovation and competitiveness. This is a large-scale challenge that requires the use of a wide variety of solutions; among these solutions, biocontrol is one of the most promising paths. Beyond the development, dissemination, and adoption of biocontrol products and agents, biocontrol must fit into culture crop management systems that are less dependent on synthetic pesticides.

The molecular signals that occur between plants and 'friendly' and 'hostile' microbes initiate a series of sophisticated plant cellular responses. These events can be decisive for pathogen detection and the activation of suitable defense transduction pathways in the plant.  

To cover some aspects of plant–microbe interactions, and to achieve an efficient protective program, the current topic will focus on understanding the following: why do certain microbes only infect specific plants—is it because they do not possess the weaponry required to infect the other plants, or because these plants are armed with a better defense system to prevent pathogen assaults? How do plants interface with beneficial micro-organisms or their derivatives?

For this Special Issue, we welcome submissions on the plant–microbe interaction to foster an understanding on the biocontrol mechanisms on the plant host by increasing the insight into the molecular, physiological, and biochemical mechanisms involved in the tripartite interactions between beneficial microbes and their derivatives, pathogens, and plants under climate change mitigation.

Based on the above, we highly encourage experts and researchers to contribute with original scientific articles, reviews, and communications addressing the following topics:

  • Plant–microbe interactions
  • Chemical controls and integrated control strategies
  • Biological control: screening, mechanisms of action, formulation, and field applications
  • The impact of microbe-derived elicitors (exogenous elicitor)
  • Pathogenesis mechanisms and plant immunity
  • Gene regulation and genomic regulatory analysis
  • Metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics analysis
  • Signal transduction during the induction of acquired resistance (immunity) in plants
  • Sustainable agriculture

Prof. Dr. Essaid Ait Barka
Dr. Cédric Jacquard
Prof. Dr. Christophe Clément
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 11777 KiB  
Article
Surfactin and Spo0A-Dependent Antagonism by Bacillus subtilis Strain UD1022 against Medicago sativa Phytopathogens
Plants 2023, 12(5), 1007; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12051007 - 23 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2444
Abstract
Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) such as the root colonizers Bacillus spp. may be ideal alternatives to chemical crop treatments. This work sought to extend the application of the broadly active PGPR UD1022 to Medicago sativa (alfalfa). Alfalfa is susceptible to many phytopathogens resulting [...] Read more.
Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) such as the root colonizers Bacillus spp. may be ideal alternatives to chemical crop treatments. This work sought to extend the application of the broadly active PGPR UD1022 to Medicago sativa (alfalfa). Alfalfa is susceptible to many phytopathogens resulting in losses of crop yield and nutrient value. UD1022 was cocultured with four alfalfa pathogen strains to test antagonism. We found UD1022 to be directly antagonistic toward Collectotrichum trifolii, Ascochyta medicaginicola (formerly Phoma medicaginis), and Phytophthora medicaginis, and not toward Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. medicaginis. Using mutant UD1022 strains lacking genes in the nonribosomal peptide (NRP) and biofilm pathways, we tested antagonism against A. medicaginicola StC 306-5 and P. medicaginis A2A1. The NRP surfactin may have a role in the antagonism toward the ascomycete StC 306-5. Antagonism toward A2A1 may be influenced by B. subtilis biofilm pathway components. The B. subtilis central regulator of both surfactin and biofilm pathways Spo0A was required for the antagonism of both phytopathogens. The results of this study indicate that the PGPR UD1022 would be a good candidate for further investigations into its antagonistic activities against C. trifolii, A. medicaginicola, and P. medicaginis in plant and field studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Bioprotection)
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21 pages, 22099 KiB  
Article
A New Biocontrol Tool to Fight Potato Late Blight Based on Willaertia magna C2c Maky Lysate
Plants 2022, 11(20), 2756; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11202756 - 18 Oct 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1801
Abstract
Potato late blight (PLB) is one of the most destructive disease affecting potatoes. Late blight control relies almost exclusively on the use of chemical pesticides, including copper products, which are efficient but controversial due to their environmental toxicity. Societal pressure and the quest [...] Read more.
Potato late blight (PLB) is one of the most destructive disease affecting potatoes. Late blight control relies almost exclusively on the use of chemical pesticides, including copper products, which are efficient but controversial due to their environmental toxicity. Societal pressure and the quest for more sustainable agriculture reinforce the need for natural plant protection products. To respond to this demand, we tested the lysate of the amoeba Willaertia magna C2c Maky on PLB. This active substance exhibits plant protection properties against grape downy mildew thanks to a dual mode of action (plant elicitor and antifungal direct effect). We hypothesized that this active substance might also have an effect against other diseases caused by oomycetes on other crops, such as potato. In vitro, in planta, and in-field studies were conducted. The collected data demonstrate that the lysate of the amoeba Willaertia magna C2c Maky is able to elicit potato defenses, and direct fungicidal activity against Phytophtora infestans was observed. Proof of efficacy was first obtained in greenhouse, with up to 80% disease reduction, and confirmed in field trials. Formulated products provided up to 77% protection in field in the case of low infestation (28%) and up to 49% protection when the untreated plants were 100% destroyed. Willaertia magna C2c Maky was also able to significantly increase yield by up to 30% in field trials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Bioprotection)
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