Specificity of ROS and Redox Regulatory Systems

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Molecular Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2023) | Viewed by 19400

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Materials and Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sophia University, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-8554, Japan
Interests: heat stress; stress combinations; reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulatory systems; long-distance signaling; signaling networks
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plants possess the ability to flexibly coordinate various signals to regulate a broad range of biological processes underlying growth, development, and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. To thrive under the natural environment, the flexible systems that function in plants also need to be equipped with specificity. For instance, multiple pathways need to be strictly coordinated to establish the specific systems that function in different types of cells, tissues, or organs. In addition, plants, as sessile organisms, need to tailor specific signalling networks to adapt to different abiotic stresses, or to protect themselves against different biotic threats.

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox regulatory systems, involving more than 100 genes, largely contribute to the regulation of flexible signalling networks in plants. Different sets of genes involved in these systems are known to be expressed in different types of cells, tissues, or organs, or upregulated in response to different biotic and/or abiotic stresses. In addition, recent studies have revealed the integration of ROS and redox regulatory systems with various other signals, such as Ca2+, nitric oxide, and plant hormones that regulate different biological processes. Thus, we can hypothesize that specific ROS and redox regulatory systems might be tailored by coordinated expressions of different sets of genes and integration with other signals. However, how such specific ROS and redox regulatory systems can be established in plants is still largely unknown.

This Special Issue will accept the papers focusing on new aspects of ROS and redox regulatory systems that function in specific types of cells, tissues, or organs, or that regulate specific responses to different biotic/abiotic stresses. Papers addressing species-specific pathways underlying growth, development, or stress responses are also encouraged. We will accept original research papers, methods, reviews, and perspectives.

Dr. Nobuhiro Suzuki
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Reactive oxygen species
  • Redox signalling
  • Specificity
  • Signaling networks
  • Cells
  • Tissues
  • Organs
  • Stresses

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 4947 KiB  
Article
Comparative Analysis of Antioxidant System and Salt-Stress Tolerance in Two Hibiscus Cultivars Exposed to NaCl Toxicity
by Wenjing Lu, Ye Zhao, Jinying Liu, Bowen Zhou, Guoqing Wei, Ruiqiang Ni, Shuyong Zhang and Jing Guo
Plants 2023, 12(7), 1525; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12071525 - 31 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1580
Abstract
Hibiscus (Hibiscus syriacus L.) is known as a horticultural plant of great ornamental and medicinal value. However, the effect of NaCl stress on hibiscus seedlings is unclear. Little is known about H. syriacus ‘Duede Brabaul’ (DB) and H. syriacus ‘Blueberry Smoothie’ (BS). Here, the [...] Read more.
Hibiscus (Hibiscus syriacus L.) is known as a horticultural plant of great ornamental and medicinal value. However, the effect of NaCl stress on hibiscus seedlings is unclear. Little is known about H. syriacus ‘Duede Brabaul’ (DB) and H. syriacus ‘Blueberry Smoothie’ (BS). Here, the effects of solutions with different concentrations of NaCl on the organic osmolytes, ion accumulation, and antioxidant enzyme activity of hibiscus seedling leaves were determined. The results showed that the Na+/K+ ratio was imbalanced with increasing NaCl concentration, especially in BS (range 34% to 121%), which was more sensitive than DB (range 32% to 187%) under NaCl concentrations of 50 to 200 mM. To cope with the osmotic stress, the content of organic osmolytes increased significantly. Additionally, NaCl stress caused a large increase in O2· and H2O2, and other reactive oxygen species (ROS), and antioxidant enzyme activity was significantly increased to remove excess ROS. The expression level of genes related to salt tolerance was significantly higher in DB than that in BS under different NaCl concentrations. Taken together, DB possessed a stronger tolerance to salt stress and the results suggest membrane stability, Na+/K+, H2O2, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase as salt tolerance biomarkers that can be used for gene transformation and breeding in future hibiscus research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Specificity of ROS and Redox Regulatory Systems)
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15 pages, 2490 KiB  
Article
The Effects of 1,4-Naphthoquinone (NQ) and Naphthazarin (5,8-Dihydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, DHNQ) Individually and in Combination on Growth and Oxidative Stress in Maize (Zea mays L.) Seedlings
by Waldemar Karcz, Zbigniew Burdach and Małgorzata Rudnicka
Plants 2023, 12(4), 900; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12040900 - 16 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1639
Abstract
This study investigated the effects of 1,4-naphthoquinone (NQ) and naphthazarin (5,8-dihydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, DHNQ) individually and in combination, applied at low concentrations (0.1, 1, and 10 nM), on growth, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, catalase activity, and lipid peroxidation in maize seedlings. [...] Read more.
This study investigated the effects of 1,4-naphthoquinone (NQ) and naphthazarin (5,8-dihydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, DHNQ) individually and in combination, applied at low concentrations (0.1, 1, and 10 nM), on growth, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, catalase activity, and lipid peroxidation in maize seedlings. It was found that NQ at 0.1 and 1 nM and DHNQ at 0.1 nM significantly stimulated the fresh weight of the aboveground parts of the seedlings (APS), while the fresh weight of the underground parts of the seedlings (UPS) was enhanced only at 0.1 nM NQ. Interestingly, DHNQ at higher concentrations (1 and 10 nM) significantly diminished the fresh weight of the APS and UPS. When NQ and DHNQ were applied together, an increase in the fresh weight of the APS at all of the concentrations studied was observed. It was also found that NQ and DHNQ individually and in combination, at all concentrations studied, decreased the H2O2 production in the aboveground and underground parts of maize seedlings. The presence of the DHNQ at higher concentrations (1 and 10 nM) triggered an increase in the catalase (CAT) activity of the UPS and APS compared to the control. However, NQ added at 1 nM decreased the CAT activity of both the UPS and APS, while 10 nM increased the CAT activity of UPS. NQ and DHNQ applied together at 0.1 and 10 nM almost completely inhibited catalase activity in the UPS and APS. The data that were obtained for lipid peroxidation, measured as the malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, indicated that NQ and DHNQ at all concentrations studied decreased the MDA content of the UPS, while both naphthoquinones increased it in APS. The data presented here are discussed taking into account the mechanisms via which naphthoquinones interact with biological systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Specificity of ROS and Redox Regulatory Systems)
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Review

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18 pages, 1410 KiB  
Review
Links between Regulatory Systems of ROS and Carbohydrates in Reproductive Development
by Hanako Kiyono, Kazuma Katano and Nobuhiro Suzuki
Plants 2021, 10(8), 1652; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10081652 - 11 Aug 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2927
Abstract
To thrive on the earth, highly sophisticated systems to finely control reproductive development have been evolved in plants. In addition, deciphering the mechanisms underlying the reproductive development has been considered as a main research avenue because it leads to the improvement of the [...] Read more.
To thrive on the earth, highly sophisticated systems to finely control reproductive development have been evolved in plants. In addition, deciphering the mechanisms underlying the reproductive development has been considered as a main research avenue because it leads to the improvement of the crop yields to fulfill the huge demand of foods for the growing world population. Numerous studies revealed the significance of ROS regulatory systems and carbohydrate transports and metabolisms in the regulation of various processes of reproductive development. However, it is poorly understood how these mechanisms function together in reproductive tissues. In this review, we discuss mode of coordination and integration between ROS regulatory systems and carbohydrate transports and metabolisms underlying reproductive development based on the hitherto findings. We then propose three mechanisms as key players that integrate ROS and carbohydrate regulatory systems. These include ROS-dependent programmed cell death (PCD), mitochondrial and respiratory metabolisms as sources of ROS and energy, and functions of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs). It is likely that these key mechanisms govern the various signals involved in the sequential events required for proper seed production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Specificity of ROS and Redox Regulatory Systems)
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12 pages, 664 KiB  
Review
Elevated CO2 and Reactive Oxygen Species in Stomatal Closure
by Xiaonan Ma and Ling Bai
Plants 2021, 10(2), 410; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10020410 - 23 Feb 2021
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 4147
Abstract
Plant guard cell is essential for photosynthesis and transpiration. The aperture of stomata is sensitive to various environment factors. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important regulator of stomatal movement, and its signaling includes the perception, transduction and gene expression. The intersections [...] Read more.
Plant guard cell is essential for photosynthesis and transpiration. The aperture of stomata is sensitive to various environment factors. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important regulator of stomatal movement, and its signaling includes the perception, transduction and gene expression. The intersections with many other signal transduction pathways make the regulation of CO2 more complex. High levels of CO2 trigger stomata closure, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) as the key component has been demonstrated function in this regulation. Additional research is required to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms, especially for the detailed signal factors related with ROS in this response. This review focuses on Arabidopsis stomatal closure induced by high-level CO2, and summarizes current knowledge of the role of ROS involved in this process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Specificity of ROS and Redox Regulatory Systems)
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13 pages, 699 KiB  
Review
Recapitulation of the Function and Role of ROS Generated in Response to Heat Stress in Plants
by Emily Medina, Su-Hwa Kim, Miriam Yun and Won-Gyu Choi
Plants 2021, 10(2), 371; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10020371 - 15 Feb 2021
Cited by 69 | Viewed by 8267
Abstract
In natural ecosystems, plants are constantly exposed to changes in their surroundings as they grow, caused by a lifestyle that requires them to live where their seeds fall. Thus, plants strive to adapt and respond to changes in their exposed environment that change [...] Read more.
In natural ecosystems, plants are constantly exposed to changes in their surroundings as they grow, caused by a lifestyle that requires them to live where their seeds fall. Thus, plants strive to adapt and respond to changes in their exposed environment that change every moment. Heat stress that naturally occurs when plants grow in the summer or a tropical area adversely affects plants’ growth and poses a risk to plant development. When plants are subjected to heat stress, they recognize heat stress and respond using highly complex intracellular signaling systems such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS was previously considered a byproduct that impairs plant growth. However, in recent studies, ROS gained attention for its function as a signaling molecule when plants respond to environmental stresses such as heat stress. In particular, ROS, produced in response to heat stress in various plant cell compartments such as mitochondria and chloroplasts, plays a crucial role as a signaling molecule that promotes plant growth and triggers subsequent downstream reactions. Therefore, this review aims to address the latest research trends and understandings, focusing on the function and role of ROS in responding and adapting plants to heat stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Specificity of ROS and Redox Regulatory Systems)
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