Microbial Communities in Stressed and Polluted Soils Related to Plant Phylogeny Volume II

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant–Soil Interactions".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2022) | Viewed by 3375

Special Issue Editors

Botany & Microbiology Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Nasr City, Cairo 11884, Egypt
Interests: environmental catalysts, bioremediation, nanoparticles, wastewater treatment, microbial ecology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Institut de Recherche en Biologie Végétale, Département de Sciences Biologiques, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada
Interests: environmental microbiology; plant-microbe interaction; mycorrhizal symbiosis; fungal biology; microbial genomics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design, North Carolina A&T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411, USA
Interests: carbon and nitrogen cycling in agroecosystems; soil health and sustainable agriculture; soil management and greenhouse gas emission; CBD hemp best management practices
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleague,

Aims and Scope

The journal Plants is planning to publish a Special Issue entitled “Microbial Diversity in Stressed and Polluted Soils Related to Plant Phylogeny.” A relevant understanding of how microbial communities respond to natural and stressed environments that contain a broad variety of toxic organic and inorganic compounds will substantially expand our knowledge of microbial ecology, evolution, behaviour and conservation. Variation of the microbial community structure in natural or polluted soils is directly related to plant phylogeny. This has implications for plant selection in phytoremediation, as microbial associations may affect the health of introduced plants and the success of co-inoculated microbial strains. An integrated understanding of the relationships between microorganisms and plants will enable the design of treatments that specifically promote effective bioremediating communities.

Research areas of interest to this Special Issue include:

  • Microbial interactions and plant phylogeny;
  • Molecular, genomic, and metagenomic analysis of microbial biodiversity;
  • Other culture-dependent methods will be considered, if they cover significant aspects of plant-microbe interactions;
  • Microbial and plant ecology in stressed environments;
  • Phytoremediation.

Related Special Issue

Microbial Communities in Stressed and Polluted Soils Related to Plant Phylogeny

https://www.mdpi.com/journal/plants/special_issues/Microbial_Plant

Dr. Saad El-Din Hassan
Prof. Dr. Mohamed Hijri
Dr. Arnab Bhowmik
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biotechnology of microbial ecology
  • plant ecology
  • biodiversity
  • plant-microbe interactions
  • high throughout sequencing
  • phytoremediation
  • microbial endophytes
  • nanotechnology
  • polluted soil

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 638 KiB  
Article
Coriander (Coriandrum sativum) Cultivation Combined with Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Inoculation and Steel Slag Application Influences Trace Elements-Polluted Soil Bacterial Functioning
Plants 2023, 12(3), 618; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12030618 - 31 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1803
Abstract
The cultivation of aromatic plants for the extraction of essential oils has been presented as an innovative and economically viable alternative for the remediation of areas polluted with trace elements (TE). Therefore, this study focuses on the contribution of the cultivation of coriander [...] Read more.
The cultivation of aromatic plants for the extraction of essential oils has been presented as an innovative and economically viable alternative for the remediation of areas polluted with trace elements (TE). Therefore, this study focuses on the contribution of the cultivation of coriander and the use of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in combination with mineral amendments (steel slag) on the bacterial function of the rhizosphere, an aspect that is currently poorly understood and studied. The introduction of soil amendments, such as steel slag or mycorrhizal inoculum, had no significant effect on coriander growth. However, steel slag changed the structure of the bacterial community in the rhizosphere without affecting microbial function. In fact, Actinobacteria were significantly less abundant under slag-amended conditions, while the relative proportion of Gemmatimonadota increased. On the other hand, the planting of coriander affects the bacterial community structure and significantly increased the bacterial functional richness of the amended soil. Overall, these results show that planting coriander most affected the structure and functioning of bacterial communities in the TE-polluted soils and reversed the effects of mineral amendments on rhizosphere bacterial communities and their activities. This study highlights the potential of coriander, especially in combination with steel slag, for phytomanagement of TE-polluted soils, by improving soil quality and health. Full article
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20 pages, 2398 KiB  
Article
Soil Microbiome Influences on Seedling Establishment and Growth of Prosopis chilensis and Prosopis tamarugo from Northern Chile
Plants 2022, 11(20), 2717; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11202717 - 14 Oct 2022
Viewed by 1286
Abstract
Prosopis chilensis and Prosopis tamarugo, two woody legumes adapted to the arid regions of Chile, have a declining distribution due to the lack of new seedling establishment. This study investigated the potential of both species to establish in soil collected from four [...] Read more.
Prosopis chilensis and Prosopis tamarugo, two woody legumes adapted to the arid regions of Chile, have a declining distribution due to the lack of new seedling establishment. This study investigated the potential of both species to establish in soil collected from four locations in Chile, within and outside the species distribution, and to assess the role of the root-colonizing microbiome in seedling establishment and growth. Seedling survival, height, and water potential were measured to assess establishment success and growth. 16S and ITS2 amplicon sequencing was used to characterize the composition of microbial communities from the different soils and to assess the ability of both Prosopis species to recruit bacteria and fungi from the different soils. Both species were established on three of the four soils. P. tamarugo seedlings showed significantly higher survival in foreign soils and maintained significantly higher water potential in Mediterranean soils. Amplicon sequencing showed that the four soils harbored distinct microbial communities. Root-associated microbial composition indicated that P. chilensis preferentially recruited mycorrhizal fungal partners while P. tamarugo recruited abundant bacteria with known salt-protective functions. Our results suggest that a combination of edaphic properties and microbial soil legacy are potential factors mediating the Prosopis establishment success in different soils. Full article
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