Molecular Breeding Approaches for Soybean Yield and Quality Trait Improvement

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Molecular Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 2329

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China
Interests: genetics ;bulk segregant analysis; Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography (UHPLC); molecular plant breeding; genome-wide association studies

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Guest Editor
MARA Key Laboratory of Soybean Biology (Beijing), Institute of Crop Sciences, Chinese Academy of AgriculturalSciences, 12 Zhongguancun South Street, Beijing 100081, China
Interests: soybean yieldbreeding; soybean resistance breeding; soybean molecular genetics
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plant domestication is of great interest to plant biologists, ethnobotanists, and archaeologists. Domestication increased plants’ adaptability to changing environmental conditions through the selection and transformation of wild plants into cultivars that were developed over thousands of years aimed at crop improvement to meet specific human needs. Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) is a legume crop; it is assumed that cultivated soybean was domesticated 6000–9000 years ago from wild soybean in East Asia and various regions of China. The crop was introduced from China to South and Southeast Asia and then, in the 18th century, it was introduced into Europe. Soybean is now grown worldwide owing to its high protein and oil content. The rise in soybean production is because to meet the food and fuel requirements of the increasing global population. Among soybean-producing countries, Brazil is the largest soybean producer, with a 37% share in the world’s production, followed by United States of America (36%), Argentina (11%), and China (4%). Soybean is a primary source of protein, oil, and bioactive components such as fatty acids, sugars, and isoflavone. The oil from soybean consists of saturated (palmitic acid, PA, and stearic acid, SA), monounsaturated (oleic acid, OA) and polyunsaturated (linoleic acid, LA, and linolenic acid, LNA) fatty acids. Polyunsaturated fatty acids cannot be synthesized in the human body and are supplied from plant sources. The seed isoflavones of soybean also have beneficial impacts on human health including treatment of different types of cancer, heart diseases, and menopause. The current Special Issue is aimed at the major needs and bottlenecks of crop science for the improvement of soybean yield, nutritional quality, and from the scientific issues behind the improvement of soybean nutritional quality.

Dr. Muhammad Azam
Prof. Dr. Junming Sun
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • oil and protein contents
  • fatty acids
  • folate
  • saponins
  • secondary metabolites, vitamins, and folates
  • maturity for area of production
  • yield
  • quality
  • comparative genome analysis
  • genetic analysis
  • epigenetics
  • phylogenetic analysis
  • molecular breeding

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 4530 KiB  
Article
Phytopathogenic Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens Strains Circulating on Leguminous Plants, Alternative Hosts and Weeds in Russia
by Anna D. Tokmakova, Rashit I. Tarakanov, Anna A. Lukianova, Peter V. Evseev, Lyubov V. Dorofeeva, Alexander N. Ignatov, Fevzi S.-U. Dzhalilov, Sergei A. Subbotin and Konstantin A. Miroshnikov
Plants 2024, 13(5), 667; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13050667 - 28 Feb 2024
Viewed by 765
Abstract
Many bacterial plant pathogens have a broad host range important for their life cycle. Alternate hosts from plant families other than the main (primary) host support the survival and dissemination of the pathogen population even in absence of main host plants. Metabolic peculiarities [...] Read more.
Many bacterial plant pathogens have a broad host range important for their life cycle. Alternate hosts from plant families other than the main (primary) host support the survival and dissemination of the pathogen population even in absence of main host plants. Metabolic peculiarities of main and alternative host plants can affect genetic diversity within and between the pathogen populations isolated from those plants. Strains of Gram-positive bacterium Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens were identified as being causal agents of bacterial spot and wilt diseases on leguminous plants, and other crop and weed plants, collected in different regions of Russia. Their biochemical properties and susceptibility to copper compounds have been found to be relatively uniform. According to conventional PCR assays, all of the isolates studied were categorised as pathovar Curtobacterim flaccumfaciens pv. flaccumfaciens, a pathogen of legumes. However, the strains demonstrated a substantial diversity in terms of virulence on several tested host plants and different phylogenetic relationships were revealed by BOX-PCR and alanine synthase gene (alaS) sequencing. Full article
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21 pages, 5735 KiB  
Article
Differentially Expressed Genes Related to Isoflavone Biosynthesis in a Soybean Mutant Revealed by a Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis
by Jung Min Kim, Jeong Woo Lee, Ji Su Seo, Bo-Keun Ha and Soon-Jae Kwon
Plants 2024, 13(5), 584; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13050584 - 21 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1018
Abstract
Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] isoflavones, which are secondary metabolites with various functions, are included in food, cosmetics, and medicine. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating the glycosylation and malonylation of isoflavone glycoconjugates remain unclear. In this study, we conducted an RNA-seq analysis [...] Read more.
Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] isoflavones, which are secondary metabolites with various functions, are included in food, cosmetics, and medicine. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating the glycosylation and malonylation of isoflavone glycoconjugates remain unclear. In this study, we conducted an RNA-seq analysis to compare soybean genotypes with different isoflavone contents, including Danbaek and Hwanggeum (low-isoflavone cultivars) as well as DB-088 (high-isoflavone mutant). The transcriptome analysis yielded over 278 million clean reads, representing 39,156 transcripts. The analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) detected 2654 up-regulated and 1805 down-regulated genes between the low- and high-isoflavone genotypes. The putative functions of these 4459 DEGs were annotated on the basis of GO and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses. These DEGs were further analyzed to compare the expression patterns of the genes involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and the genes encoding transcription factors. The examination of the relative expression levels of 70 isoflavone biosynthetic genes revealed the HID, IFS, UGT, and MAT expression levels were significantly up/down-regulated depending on the genotype and seed developmental stage. These expression patterns were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Moreover, a gene co-expression analysis detected potential protein–protein interactions, suggestive of common functions. The study findings provide valuable insights into the structural genes responsible for isoflavone biosynthesis and accumulation in soybean seeds. Full article
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