Plant Extracts as a Source of Bioactive Compounds with Beneficial Effects on Skin Health

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2024) | Viewed by 8675

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Department for Pharmaceutical Research and Development, Institute for Medicinal Plants Research “Dr Josif Pančić“, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
Interests: ethnobotany; natural product chemistry; chromatography
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Guest Editor
Scientific Department, Institute for Medicinal Plants Research “Dr Josif Pančić“, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
Interests: phytochemistry; biological activity; phytotherapy; ethnomedicine; extractions; formulation of herbal products
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Guest Editor
Department of Biology, Science Faculty, Selcuk University, Selcuk 42130, Turkey
Interests: antioxidant capacity; natural products; enzyme inhibition; phenolics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, various therapies are used to treat skin disorders; nevertheless, they show limitations, including adverse effects or limited penetration. For that reason, there is ongoing interest in the identification of novel, low-cost, highly effective, and safe molecules that may be applied in the treatment of skin disorders, particularly chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. One of the potential sources of biologically active agents are the natural products obtained from plants. Plant extracts consist of active ingredients that can demonstrate multiple effects, such as antibacterial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-ageing activities. With that in mind, they are potential components of cosmetic and dermatological preparations.

This Special Issue, entitled ‘Plant Extracts as a Source of Bioactive Compounds with Beneficial Effects on Skin Health’, aims to characterize new approaches in the treatment of skin disorders by collecting papers that focus on topics such as atopic dermatitis, wound healing, photoaging, melanogenesis, skin damage, and skin penetration. We also warmly welcome research and review articles on a variety of topics such as the ethnobotany and ethnopharmacology of plants used for skin disease prevention and therapy, the characterization of active ingredients in plant extracts with skin beneficial properties, as well as studies describing the efficacy of natural products (molecules) and their mechanisms of action in the treatment of skin diseases.

Dr. Jelena Živković
Dr. Katarina Šavikin
Dr. Gokhan Zengin
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • plant extracts
  • polyphenolics
  • psoriasis
  • atopic dermatitis
  • aging

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 2172 KiB  
Article
In Vitro Safety and Efficacy Evaluation of a Juniperus communis Callus Culture Extract and Matricaria recutita Processing Waste Extract Combination as a Cosmetic Ingredient
by Anna Ramata-Stunda, Martins Boroduskis, Laura Pastare, Marta Berga, Liene Kienkas, Liene Patetko, Gundars Skudrins, Dace Reihmane and Ilva Nakurte
Plants 2024, 13(2), 287; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13020287 - 18 Jan 2024
Viewed by 950
Abstract
For skin health promotion and cosmetic applications, combinations of plant cell extracts are extensively utilized. As most natural ingredient suppliers offer crude extracts from individual plants or specific isolated compounds, the potential interactions between them are assessed in the development phase of cosmetic [...] Read more.
For skin health promotion and cosmetic applications, combinations of plant cell extracts are extensively utilized. As most natural ingredient suppliers offer crude extracts from individual plants or specific isolated compounds, the potential interactions between them are assessed in the development phase of cosmetic products. The industry seeks extract combinations that have undergone optimization and scrutiny for their bioactivities. This study presents a combination of two sustainably produced botanical ingredients and outlines their chemical composition, in vitro safety, and bioactivity for skin health enhancement. The amalgamation comprises the extract of Matricaria recutita processing waste and the extract from Juniperus communis callus culture. Chemical analysis revealed distinct compounds within the extracts, and their combination led to a broader array of potentially synergistic compounds. In vitro assessments on skin cells demonstrated that the combination possesses robust antioxidant properties and the ability to stimulate keratinocyte proliferation, along with regulating collagen type I and matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) production by dermal fibroblasts. The identified traits of this combination render it an appealing cosmetic component. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first case when the extracts derived from medicinal plant processing waste and biotechnological plant cell cultivation processes have been combined and evaluated for their bioactivity. Full article
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24 pages, 3986 KiB  
Article
Microencapsulated Bilberry and Chokeberry Leaf Extracts with Potential Health Benefits
by Snežana Kuzmanović Nedeljković, Milica Radan, Nada Ćujić Nikolić, Zorana Mutavski, Nemanja Krgović, Smilja Marković, Tatjana Stević, Jelena Živković and Katarina Šavikin
Plants 2023, 12(23), 3979; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12233979 - 27 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1046
Abstract
The aim of the research was to develop microencapsulated powders of bilberry and chokeberry extracts via the spray drying technique. Two biopolymers, pectin alone and in combination with HP-β-CD, were used to preserve the antioxidant, hypoglycemic, photoprotective, and antimicrobial bioactivity of the berry [...] Read more.
The aim of the research was to develop microencapsulated powders of bilberry and chokeberry extracts via the spray drying technique. Two biopolymers, pectin alone and in combination with HP-β-CD, were used to preserve the antioxidant, hypoglycemic, photoprotective, and antimicrobial bioactivity of the berry leaf extracts. Moreover, the formed powders were characterized in terms of technological, chemical, and several biological properties. The obtained micro-sized powders (mean average particle diameter from 3.83 to 5.94 µm) demonstrated a process yield of up to 73%. The added biopolymers improved the flowability and cohesive properties of the powders and increased their thermal stability to 170 °C. The total content of polyphenolics in the powders ranged from 323.35 to 367.76 mg GAE/g DW for bilberry and from 186.85 to 227.59 mg GAE/g DW for chokeberry powders; meanwhile, chlorogenic acid was the predominant compound in powders. All samples showed stronger α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (IC50 values ranged from 5.00 to 19.59 µg/mL) compared with the reference standard. The study confirmed that spray drying is a suitable method for the preservation of the polyphenolic-rich extracts, while the addition of carriers has a positive effect on the improvement of microencapsulated powders’ properties. Full article
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17 pages, 4494 KiB  
Article
Skin-Whitening Effect of a Callus Extract of Nelumbo nucifera Isolate Haman
by Sung Ho Moon, Euihyun Kim, Hye-In Kim, Soo-Yun Kim, Hyo-Hyun Seo, Jeong Hun Lee, Min-Sup Lee, Seung-Ki Lee, Sang Hyun Moh and Seunghee Bae
Plants 2023, 12(23), 3923; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12233923 - 21 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1503
Abstract
The sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. Isolate Haman, in the family Nelumbonaceae) used in this study originated from the Haman region of Korea, and lotus seeds dating back to the Goryeo Dynasty (650–760 years ago) were accidentally discovered. Lotus is known to [...] Read more.
The sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. Isolate Haman, in the family Nelumbonaceae) used in this study originated from the Haman region of Korea, and lotus seeds dating back to the Goryeo Dynasty (650–760 years ago) were accidentally discovered. Lotus is known to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and soothing properties. Instead of using the lotus alone, we obtained extracts using Haman region lotus-derived callus (HLC), which allowed for a controlled, quantitative, and infinite supply. Based on the reported effects of the lotus, we formulated a hypothesis to investigate the skin-whitening effect of the HLC extract (HLCE). The HLCE was first obtained by extraction with distilled water and using 5% propanediol as a solvent and subsequently verified for the whitening effect (melanin content tests) using mammalian cells in vitro. Its efficacy at the molecular level was confirmed through real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using melanin-related genes. Furthermore, clinical trials with 21 volunteers confirmed the significant whitening effect of cosmetics containing the HLCE. In conclusion, we found that the HLCE not only has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and skin-soothing properties but also plays an essential role in skin whitening. Therefore, we propose that the HLCE has the potential to become a new raw material for the cosmetic industry. Full article
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20 pages, 7293 KiB  
Article
Bio-Stimulant for Improving Simmondsia chinensis Secondary Metabolite Production, as Well as Antimicrobial Activity and Wound Healing Abilities
by Fadia El Sherif, Munirah AlDayel, Mohammad Bani Ismail, Hind Salih Alrajeh, Nancy S. Younis and Salah Khattab
Plants 2023, 12(18), 3311; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12183311 - 19 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1094
Abstract
Simmondsia chinensis is a dioecious, long-lived perennial shrub. Its leaves contain several antioxidant flavonoids that have numerous pharmacological effects. Various strategies have been explored to propagate jojoba with enhanced pharmacological values. This research evaluates the bio-stimulatory impacts of He–Ne laser seed irradiation on [...] Read more.
Simmondsia chinensis is a dioecious, long-lived perennial shrub. Its leaves contain several antioxidant flavonoids that have numerous pharmacological effects. Various strategies have been explored to propagate jojoba with enhanced pharmacological values. This research evaluates the bio-stimulatory impacts of He–Ne laser seed irradiation on seed germination, plantlet growth, and alteration of the composition and bioactivities of phytochemicals in jojoba plants. Jojoba seeds were irradiated for 5, 10, and 15 min before in vitro germination. Germination, growth, and multiplication parameters were recorded during germination, multiple-shoot induction, and rooting stages. The wound healing and antimicrobial activities of methanolic extracts from plant lines obtained from the non-irradiated (control) and 10 min irradiated seeds were compared by excision wound model in Wistar male rats and zone of inhibition assay. Our study revealed that laser irradiation increased seed germination, with the highest percentage observed in seeds irradiated for 10 min. Plant lines from the 10 min irradiated seeds produced more explants with higher explant heights and numbers of leaves, more roots, and higher photosynthetic pigment contents than those of control and other laser testings. By comparing plant extracts from the control and 10 min treatments, we observed that extracts from the 10 min treatment exhibited higher percentages of wound contraction and shorter epithelialization periods. In addition, these extracts also resulted in higher levels of angiogenesis elements (VEGF, TGF-β1, and HIF-1α) and reduced the inflammation regulators (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and NFκB) in the experimental rats. In concordance, extracts from the 10 min treatment also explained raised antibacterial activities towards Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Our findings show that pre-sowing seed treatment with a He–Ne laser (632.8 nm) could be a good technique for stimulating S. chinensis plant growth and increasing the impact compound levels and biological activities. Full article
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17 pages, 1198 KiB  
Article
Rosehip Extract-Loaded Liposomes for Potential Skin Application: Physicochemical Properties of Non- and UV-Irradiated Liposomes
by Aleksandra A. Jovanović, Bojana Balanč, Mina Volić, Ilinka Pećinar, Jelena Živković and Katarina P. Šavikin
Plants 2023, 12(17), 3063; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12173063 - 25 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1127
Abstract
In the present study, rosehip (Rosa canina L.) extract was successfully encapsulated in phospholipid liposomes using a single-step procedure named the proliposome method. Part of the obtained liposomes was subjected to UV irradiation and non-treated (native) and UV-irradiated liposomes were further characterized [...] Read more.
In the present study, rosehip (Rosa canina L.) extract was successfully encapsulated in phospholipid liposomes using a single-step procedure named the proliposome method. Part of the obtained liposomes was subjected to UV irradiation and non-treated (native) and UV-irradiated liposomes were further characterized in terms of encapsulation efficiency, chemical composition (HPLC analysis), antioxidant capacity, particle size, PDI, zeta potential, conductivity, mobility, and antioxidant capacity. Raman spectroscopy as well as DSC analysis were applied to evaluate the influence of UV irradiation on the physicochemical properties of liposomes. The encapsulation efficiency of extract-loaded liposomes was higher than 90%; the average size was 251.5 nm; the zeta potential was −22.4 mV; and the conductivity was found to be 0.007 mS/cm. UV irradiation did not cause a change in the mentioned parameters. In addition, irradiation did not affect the antioxidant potential of the liposome–extract system. Raman spectroscopy indicated that the extract was completely covered by the lipid membrane during liposome entrapment, and the peroxidation process was minimized by the presence of rosehip extract in liposomes. These results may guide the potential application of rosehip extract-loaded liposomes in the food, pharmaceutical, or cosmetic industries, particularly when liposomal sterilization is needed. Full article
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36 pages, 2280 KiB  
Article
From Aloe vera Leaf Waste to the Extracts with Biological Potential: Optimization of the Extractions, Physicochemical Characterization, and Biological Activities
by Muna Rajab Elferjane, Aleksandra A. Jovanović, Violeta Milutinović, Natalija Čutović, Milica Jovanović Krivokuća and Aleksandar Marinković
Plants 2023, 12(14), 2744; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12142744 - 24 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2360
Abstract
In the study, the optimization of the extraction from Aloe vera leaf waste was performed via varying solid-to-solvent ratio, solvent type, extraction time, and technique (maceration, heat-, ultrasound-, and microwave-assisted extractions—HAE, UAE, and MAE, respectively). The optimal extraction conditions for achieving the highest [...] Read more.
In the study, the optimization of the extraction from Aloe vera leaf waste was performed via varying solid-to-solvent ratio, solvent type, extraction time, and technique (maceration, heat-, ultrasound-, and microwave-assisted extractions—HAE, UAE, and MAE, respectively). The optimal extraction conditions for achieving the highest polyphenol content are a 1:30 ratio, 70% ethanol, and 30 min of HAE. Total flavonoid and protein contents were significantly higher in the extract from MAE, while total condensed tannin content was the highest in HAE. LC-MS analysis quantified 13 anthraquinone and chromone compounds. The variations in the FT-IR spectra of the extracts obtained by different extraction procedures are minor. The influence of extraction conditions on the antioxidant ability of the extracts depended on applied antioxidant assays. The extracts possessed medium inhibition properties against Staphylococcus aureus and weak inhibitory activity against Enterococcus feacalis. The extracts had stimulative effect on HaCaT cell viability. Regarding the extraction yield, there was a significant difference between the used extraction techniques (MAE > HAE > maceration and UAE). The presented study is an initial step in the production of polyphenol-rich extracts from A. vera leaf waste aimed to be used for the potential preparation of pharmaceutical and cosmetic formulations for the skin. Full article
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