Plant Tissue Culture: Advances and Applications

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Genetics, Genomics and Biotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 2420

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Agricultural Research Station, Fort Valley State University, Fort Valley, GA 31030, USA
Interests: plant science; plant tissue culture; medicinal plants; plant reproductive biology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plant tissue cultures provide complementary academic and commercial facets. Application of new plant growth regulators and their combinations, compounds with PGR-like activities, the priming of donor plants and tissues, the role of silicon and various nanoparticles to reduce stress during incubation and the effect of light during morphogenesis and embryogenesis have helped understand challenges in plant tissue culture. Many high-value, underutilized plants of limited distribution require reliable in vitro multiplication protocols, and research becomes even more important if the plant is recalcitrant and requires ex situ conservation protocols as well.

In this Special Issue, we aim to address research applications in the areas mentioned above. We welcome both critical reviews of literature, as well as original research of either academic or commercial nature. This Special Issue will cover articles/topics of a wide range, including morphogenesis, somatic embryogenesis, efficient regeneration protocols to facilitate gene editing and transformation, conservation strategies, media formulations, etc. Innovations in plant tissue culture that help in keeping the prices down with improved plant health are important to support sustainable production systems.

Dr. Nirmal Joshee
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plant cell culture
  • microstructures
  • acclimatization
  • hyperhydricity
  • nanoparticles
  • conservation
  • plasticity
  • genetic transformation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 5402 KiB  
Article
Effect of Picloram and Desiccation on the Somatic Embryogenesis of Lycium barbarum L.
by Poonam Khatri and Nirmal Joshee
Plants 2024, 13(2), 151; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13020151 - 5 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1060
Abstract
An efficient and reproducible in vitro method for indirect somatic embryogenesis was optimized by culturing leaf and leaf with petiole explants of Lycium barbarum L. Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium, supplemented with various concentrations of Picloram and 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), individually and in [...] Read more.
An efficient and reproducible in vitro method for indirect somatic embryogenesis was optimized by culturing leaf and leaf with petiole explants of Lycium barbarum L. Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium, supplemented with various concentrations of Picloram and 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), individually and in combinations, were tested. Picloram (1.0 µM) showed a better response compared to 2,4-D and results indicate it to be a better auxin for induction of somatic embryos for Goji berry. It was seen that the leaf explants were more responsive in callus and somatic embryo induction than the leaf with petiole explant when incubated in the dark for 5 weeks. Embryogenic callus, after being transferred to MS medium containing Benzyl amino purine (BAP) in 1.0 µM, 5.0 µM and 10.0 µM, began to differentiate in light after one week. MS medium with 1.0 µM Picloram + 10 µM BAP resulted as the most favorable treatment for somatic embryogenesis in Lycium barbarum L. Removal of plant growth regulators from MS medium and culturing induced calluses under 16 h photoperiod resulted in globular, heart, torpedo, cotyledons, and further development into plantlets. Well-developed plants have been obtained and are capable of acclimatizing in ex vitro conditions. In addition, the effects of desiccation treatments (0, 1, 3, 6, 9 h, and 12 h) on embryogenic callus for somatic embryo induction were found to be directly proportional to the length of desiccation treatment at room temperature. After 9 h and 12 h of desiccation treatments, 60% and 90% of plated calluses resulted in somatic embryos, respectively. In a L. barbarum callus mass, Acetocarmine and Evans blue double staining differentiated between embryogenic and non-embryogenic callus. These findings will help Goji berry improvement by elite clone production, ex situ conservation projects, scaling up plant production, and agronomy for the commercial production of this superfruit in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Tissue Culture: Advances and Applications)
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Review

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13 pages, 1516 KiB  
Review
Widening Genetic Diversity Using Embryo Rescue in Cucurbit Crops: A Review
by Chinreddy Subramanyam Reddy, Sahithi Ramireddy and Umesh K. Reddy
Plants 2024, 13(10), 1320; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13101320 - 10 May 2024
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Abstract
Embryo rescue is a vital technique in cucurbit breeding and propagation, addressing challenges such as embryo abortion, poor seed viability, and incompatibility barriers. This method involves the excision of immature embryos from seeds followed by their in vitro culture on a nutrient medium, [...] Read more.
Embryo rescue is a vital technique in cucurbit breeding and propagation, addressing challenges such as embryo abortion, poor seed viability, and incompatibility barriers. This method involves the excision of immature embryos from seeds followed by their in vitro culture on a nutrient medium, providing an environment conducive to their growth and development. In cucurbits, embryo rescue has been extensively utilized to overcome barriers to hybridization, enabling the production of interspecific and intergeneric hybrids with desired traits. Various factors, including genotype, developmental stage of embryos, and culture conditions, influence the success of embryo rescue in cucurbits. Optimal nutrient formulations, growth regulators, and culture techniques are critical for promoting embryo germination, shoot elongation, and subsequent plantlet establishment. Additionally, embryo rescue facilitates the recovery of valuable genetic material from wild and exotic cucurbit species, expanding genetic diversity and developing novel cultivars with improved traits such as disease resistance, yield, and quality. This review highlights the principles, applications, and advancements in embryo rescue technology in cucurbits, emphasizing its significance in cucurbit breeding programs and crop improvement efforts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Tissue Culture: Advances and Applications)
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