Light and Plant Nutrition

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 April 2024 | Viewed by 3132

Special Issue Editors

Lithuanian Research Centre for Agriculture and Forestry, Institute of Horticulture, Kaunas str. 30, Kaunas distr., LT-54333 Babtai, Lithuania
Interests: plant stress physiology; phytochemistry; nanotechnology in agriculture; hydroponics
* We dedicate the memory of the editor, Dr. Jurga Miliauskienė, who passed away during this special issue period.
Institute of Horticulture, Lithuanian Research Centre for Agriculture and Forestry, Kaunas Str. 30, 54333 Kaunas, Lithuania
Interests: photophysiology; physiology of plant productivity; stress physiology; horticulture
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Lithuanian Research Centre for Agriculture and Forestry, Institute of Horticulture, Kaunas Str. 30, Kaunas Distr., LT-54333 Babtai, Lithuania
Interests: nanotechnology in agriculture; physiology of plant stress; physiology of plant productivity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past few decades, consumers have become more health-conscious and are consuming more vegetables, which are a source of various health-beneficial compounds, including minerals. Various vegetables are widely cultivated in open fields, various tunnels, screenhouses and controlled environment agriculture (CEA). Light is one of the most important environmental factors which has significant effects on plant growth development and metabolism. The technology of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) lighting has increasingly been used in CEA. This allows the light spectrum, intensity, and duration to be tailored to enhance specific physiological responses in plants and optimise the light use efficiency when cultivating high-value crops. Manipulation of light quality using photo-selective netting or films is important for the yield and quality of horticulture plants cultivated in tunnels and screenhouses. Seasonal lighting changes are important for open-field plants. Numerous studies have reported the effects of various lighting conditions on plants' primary and secondary metabolism. However, there is still a lack of information on how manipulation of light parameters can alter mineral nutrient levels and their interactions in various horticultural plants. More than half of the world's population suffers from an insufficient content of micronutrients in their diet, so various modern, safe measures are being sought to improve the nutritional properties of plants. One of the methods is biofortification, which was proposed as a solution to increase the content of mineral nutrients in various plants not only by breeding or biotechnological methods but also by applying various agrotechnological measures, e.g. purposeful selection of artificial lighting, customised targeted nutrition, use of various nanoparticles or adaptation of interaction of other factors. In this case, it is very important to understand the mechanisms of the effects of lighting and other environmental factors on plant mineral metabolism and related changes in the synthesis of bioactive compounds. In this Special Issue, will be published reviews and scientific research focusing on the impact of various light parameters (spectrum, intensity, photoperiod, etc.) on the contents of macro- and microelements and the analysis of their interaction with various bioactive compounds.

Dr. Jurga Miliauskienė
Dr. Aušra Brazaitytė
Dr. Rūta Sutulienė
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • light parameters (spectrum, intensity, photoperiod, etc.)
  • light-emitting diodes
  • covering materials
  • photo-selective nets
  • interaction between light and other environmental factors (temperature, CO2, relative humidity, plant nutrition, etc.) interaction
  • macronutrients
  • micronutrients
  • nano nutrients
  • biofortification
  • metabolism
  • nutrient–nutrient interaction

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 1261 KiB  
Article
Integrating Smart Greenhouse Cover, Reduced Nitrogen Dose and Biostimulant Application as a Strategy for Sustainable Cultivation of Cherry Tomato
Plants 2024, 13(3), 440; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13030440 - 02 Feb 2024
Viewed by 586
Abstract
Fruit yield and quality of greenhouse tomatoes are strongly influenced by light conditions and nitrogen (N) availability, however, the interaction between these factors is still unclear. We evaluated the effects on cherry tomatoes of two tunnel plastic covers with different optical properties and [...] Read more.
Fruit yield and quality of greenhouse tomatoes are strongly influenced by light conditions and nitrogen (N) availability, however, the interaction between these factors is still unclear. We evaluated the effects on cherry tomatoes of two tunnel plastic covers with different optical properties and three N doses, also in combination with a biostimulant treatment. We compared a diffuse light film (Film1) and a conventional clear film (Film2), and three N levels, corresponding to 50% (N50), 75% (N75) and 100% (N100) of the optimal dose, with and without a microbial plus a protein hydrolysed biostimulant, compared to a non-treated control. The three experimental treatments significantly interacted on several yield and quality parameters. In control plants (untreated with biostimulants), the early yield was higher at reduced N doses compared to N100, with greater increments under the diffusive Film1 compared to the clear Film2 (+57.7% and +37.0% vs. +31.7% and +16.0%, in N50 and N75 respectively). Film1 boosted the total fruit production at all the N rates and with or without biostimulants, compared to Film2, with stronger effects under sub-optimal N (+29.4% in N50, +21.2% in N75, and +7.8% in N100, in plants untreated with biostimulant). Total yield decreased with decreasing N levels, while it always increased with the application of biostimulants, which counterbalanced the detrimental effects of N shortage. Quality traits were mainly affected by the cover film and the biostimulant treatment. The diffusive film increased the content of carotenoids, lycopene and total phenols compared to the clear one, and the biostimulants increased texture, soluble solids, phenols and ascorbic acid compared to the untreated control. It is worth noting that in plants fertilized at 75% of the reference N dose, the biostimulants determined higher yield than the N100 untreated control, under both the covers (+48% in Film1 and +20% in Film2). In conclusion, the diffusive film improved the fruit yield and quality of greenhouse tomatoes in the spring–summer period, presumably avoiding plant stress due to high-intensity direct light. Reduced N rates limited the plant productivity, however, the biostimulant application was effective in compensating for the detrimental effects of sub-optimal supply of N synthetic fertilizers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light and Plant Nutrition)
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Review

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17 pages, 1070 KiB  
Review
The Role of Blue and Red Light in the Orchestration of Secondary Metabolites, Nutrient Transport and Plant Quality
Plants 2023, 12(10), 2026; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12102026 - 18 May 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2015
Abstract
Light is a fundamental environmental parameter for plant growth and development because it provides an energy source for carbon fixation during photosynthesis and regulates many other physiological processes through its signaling. In indoor horticultural cultivation systems, sole-source light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have shown great [...] Read more.
Light is a fundamental environmental parameter for plant growth and development because it provides an energy source for carbon fixation during photosynthesis and regulates many other physiological processes through its signaling. In indoor horticultural cultivation systems, sole-source light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have shown great potential for optimizing growth and producing high-quality products. Light is also a regulator of flowering, acting on phytochromes and inducing or inhibiting photoperiodic plants. Plants respond to light quality through several light receptors that can absorb light at different wavelengths. This review summarizes recent progress in our understanding of the role of blue and red light in the modulation of important plant quality traits, nutrient absorption and assimilation, as well as secondary metabolites, and includes the dynamic signaling networks that are orchestrated by blue and red wavelengths with a focus on transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming, plant productivity, and the nutritional quality of products. Moreover, it highlights future lines of research that should increase our knowledge to develop tailored light recipes to shape the plant characteristics and the nutritional and nutraceutical value of horticultural products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light and Plant Nutrition)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Plant secondary metabolites, nutrients transport and assimilation and their modulation by blue and red light under indoor environment
Authors: Daniela Romano; Antonio Ferrante; Alice Trivellini; Stefania Toscano
Affiliation: Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Università degli Studi di Pisa, Pisa, Italy; Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of Milan, Milano, Italy; Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment (Di3A) University of Catania, Italy
Abstract: Light is a fundamental environmental parameter with respect to plant growth and development since provides energy source for carbon fixation in photosynthesis and regulates through its signaling many other physiological processes. In indoor horticulture cultivation systems, the use of sole-source light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has shown great potential for optimizing growth and produce high-quality products. This review highlights the morphological traits, accumulation of important plant metabolites and dynamic nutrient transport / uptake signaling networks that are orchestrated by red and blue wavelengths with focus on transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming, plant productivity and plant nutritional quality.

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