Cardiac Physiology and Pathophysiology

A special issue of Physiologia (ISSN 2673-9488).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 3517

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Health Sciences, Liverpool Hope University, Liverpool L16 9JD, UK
Interests: cardiac physiology; strength and conditioning; anabolic steroids; supplementation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cardiac structure and functions have long been shown to adapt in response to a broad range of stimuli. Disease states, acute and chronic exercise training, drugs and supplements for health, performance-enhancing and recreational drugs can all impact cardiac structure and function.

Similar structural and functional responses can be observed in response to these different stimuli. Therefore, appreciating the scale and type of adaptations that occur and how these responses translate to health and performance outcomes is an important aspect for cardiac physiologists to understand.

Thus, the aim of this Special Issue is to highlight the scale and breadth of structural and functional changes that can occur in response to a broad spectrum of stimuli and how they impact health and performance outcomes.

Dr. Peter Angell
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Physiologia is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cardiac structure and functions
  • disease states
  • acute and chronic exercise training
  • drugs

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Other

30 pages, 2831 KiB  
Systematic Review
Remodeling in Persistent Atrial Fibrillation: Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Targets—A Systematic Review
by Attila Roka and Isaac Burright
Physiologia 2023, 3(1), 43-72; https://doi.org/10.3390/physiologia3010004 - 9 Jan 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3053
Abstract
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is characterized by disorganized rapid atrial electrical activity, which leads to impaired atrial function, adverse hemodynamic effects, and increased thromboembolic risk. The paroxysmal forms of AF can be effectively treated with current pharmacological and non-pharmacological modalities by targeting the arrhythmia [...] Read more.
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is characterized by disorganized rapid atrial electrical activity, which leads to impaired atrial function, adverse hemodynamic effects, and increased thromboembolic risk. The paroxysmal forms of AF can be effectively treated with current pharmacological and non-pharmacological modalities by targeting the arrhythmia triggers. Persistent AF, however, is more difficult to treat due to remodeling processes which may become major factors in the maintenance of the arrhythmia, rendering trigger-targeting treatment options less effective. We will systematically review the recent findings of the development and maintenance of persistent AF, including genetic, cellular, organ level, and systemic processes. As AF remains the most common sustained arrhythmia with the ongoing need to find effective treatment, we will also discuss potential treatment options targeting the remodeling processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cardiac Physiology and Pathophysiology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop