Stomach-Specific Drug Delivery

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Drug Delivery and Controlled Release".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2023) | Viewed by 13387

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: pharmaceutical nanotechnology; mucosal delivery; poorly soluble drugs; additive manufacturing
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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, School of Pharmacy, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: mucosal drug delivery; paediatric drug delivery; poorly-soluble drugs; self-assembling peptides
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oral delivery is still the most common route of medication administration. However, conventional oral dosage forms may require frequent administration to enhance therapeutic efficacy and may lead to medication non-adherence. In order to address the physiological constraints of the gastrointestinal tract, such as variable gastric emptying and intestinal transit rates, gastroretentive dosage forms have emerged as a promising alternative. Prolonging drug residency and release in the stomach is an advantageous approach to increase drug absorption and bioavailability, reduce dosing frequency, and achieve targeted drug delivery to the stomach.

This Special Issue aims to highlight the current progress in the field of stomach-specific drug delivery, welcoming both original research articles and reviews. Addressed research areas may include (but are not limited to) gastroretentive dosage forms, that may be floating, gastroadhesive, expandable, swellable, nanofibrous, high-density, pH responsive, or magnetic drug delivery systems for sustained drug delivery or drug targeting to the stomach.

Prof. Dr. Dimitrios G. Fatouros
Dr. Christina Karavasili
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • stomach-specific drug delivery
  • gastroretentive dosage forms
  • floating drug delivery systems
  • expandable drug delivery systems
  • gastroadhesive drug delivery systems
  • swellable drug delivery systems
  • nanofibrous drug delivery systems
  • high-density drug delivery systems
  • pH-responsive drug delivery systems
  • magnetic drug delivery systems

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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23 pages, 6636 KiB  
Article
Expandable Drug Delivery Systems Based on Shape Memory Polymers: Impact of Film Coating on Mechanical Properties and Release and Recovery Performance
by Marco Uboldi, Chiara Pasini, Stefano Pandini, Francesco Baldi, Francesco Briatico-Vangosa, Nicoletta Inverardi, Alessandra Maroni, Saliha Moutaharrik, Alice Melocchi, Andrea Gazzaniga and Lucia Zema
Pharmaceutics 2022, 14(12), 2814; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics14122814 - 15 Dec 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1872
Abstract
Retentive drug delivery systems (DDSs) are intended for prolonged residence and release inside hollow muscular organs, to achieve either local or systemic therapeutic goals. Recently, formulations based on shape memory polymers (SMPs) have gained attention in view of their special ability to recover [...] Read more.
Retentive drug delivery systems (DDSs) are intended for prolonged residence and release inside hollow muscular organs, to achieve either local or systemic therapeutic goals. Recently, formulations based on shape memory polymers (SMPs) have gained attention in view of their special ability to recover a shape with greater spatial encumbrance at the target organ (e.g., urinary bladder or stomach), triggered by contact with biological fluids at body temperature. In this work, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), a pharmaceutical-grade SMP previously shown to be an interesting 4D printing candidate, was employed to fabricate expandable organ-retentive prototypes by hot melt extrusion. With the aim of improving the mechanical resistance of the expandable DDS and slowing down relevant drug release, the application of insoluble permeable coatings based on either Eudragit® RS/RL or Eudragit® NE was evaluated using simple I-shaped specimens. The impact of the composition and thickness of the coating on the shape memory, swelling, and release behavior as well as on the mechanical properties of these specimens was thoroughly investigated and the effectiveness of the proposed strategy was demonstrated by the results obtained. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stomach-Specific Drug Delivery)
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14 pages, 4093 KiB  
Article
FDM 3D-Printed Sustained-Release Gastric-Floating Verapamil Hydrochloride Formulations with Cylinder, Capsule and Hemisphere Shapes, and Low Infill Percentage
by Haonan Qian, Di Chen, Xiangyu Xu, Rui Li, Guangrong Yan and Tianyuan Fan
Pharmaceutics 2022, 14(2), 281; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics14020281 - 25 Jan 2022
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 3007
Abstract
The aim of this work was to design and fabricate fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D-printed sustained-release gastric-floating formulations with different shapes (cylinder, capsule and hemisphere) and infill percentages (0% and 15%), and to investigate the influence of shape and infill percentage on the [...] Read more.
The aim of this work was to design and fabricate fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D-printed sustained-release gastric-floating formulations with different shapes (cylinder, capsule and hemisphere) and infill percentages (0% and 15%), and to investigate the influence of shape and infill percentage on the properties of the printed formulations. Drug-loaded filaments containing HPMC, Soluplus® and verapamil hydrochloride were prepared via hot-melt extrusion (HME) and then used to print the following gastric-floating formulations: cylinder-15, capsule-0, capsule-15, hemisphere-0 and hemisphere-15. The morphology of the filaments and the printed formulations were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The physical state of the drugs in the filaments and the printed formulations were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The printed formulations were evaluated in vitro, including the weight variation, hardness, floating time, drug content and drug release. The results showed that the drug-loaded filament prepared was successful in printing the gastric floating formulations. Verapamil hydrochloride was proved thermally stable during HME and FDM, and in an amorphous state in the filament and the printed formulations. The shape and infill percentage of the printed formulations effected the hardness, floating time and in vitro drug release. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stomach-Specific Drug Delivery)
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Review

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22 pages, 1713 KiB  
Review
The Development of Innovative Dosage Forms of the Fixed-Dose Combination of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients
by Magdalena Janczura, Szymon Sip and Judyta Cielecka-Piontek
Pharmaceutics 2022, 14(4), 834; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics14040834 - 11 Apr 2022
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 7625
Abstract
The development of innovative forms of combination drugs is closely related to the invention of the multilayer tablet press, polymers for pharmaceutical applications, the hot-melt extrusion process, and 3D printing in the pharmaceutical industry. However, combining multiple drugs within the same dosage form [...] Read more.
The development of innovative forms of combination drugs is closely related to the invention of the multilayer tablet press, polymers for pharmaceutical applications, the hot-melt extrusion process, and 3D printing in the pharmaceutical industry. However, combining multiple drugs within the same dosage form can bring many physicochemical and pharmacodynamic interactions. More and more new forms of fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) have been developed due to work to overcome the incompatibility of active substances or to obtain different drug release profiles in the same dosage form. This review provides discussions of the application of various innovation formulation technologies of FDC drugs such as bilayer system, multilayer tablet, active film coating, hot-melt extrusion, and 3D printing, taking into account the characteristics of the key ingredients in the FDC formulation and presenting technological problems and challenges related to the development of combination drugs. Moreover, the article summarizes the range of dosage forms that have been made using these technologies over the past 30 years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stomach-Specific Drug Delivery)
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