Feature Papers: Emerging Processes, Analytics and Dosage Forms in Pharmaceutical Processing and Drug Delivery

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 July 2016) | Viewed by 8954

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0RE, UK
Interests: particulate systems and formulations for drug delivery; vaccine adjuvanticity and diagnostics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Aston Pharmacy School, School of Life and Health Sciences, Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET, UK
Interests: freeze drying; fast disintegrating tablets; reformulation of medicines; microarray
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue “Feature Papers: Emerging Processes, Analytics and Dosage Forms in Pharmaceutical Processing and Drug Delivery” will address new developments in pharmaceutical processing, such as continuous processing that is integrated with process analytical tools (PAT), and where possible, supported by Quality by Design (QbD). The Special Issue also deals with the latest approaches in novel analytical methods that would support the mechanistic evaluation of the materials and processes that would aid the smart design and development of dosage forms. Preference will be awarded to papers that demonstrate contributions from scientists that provide interdisciplinary approaches to understanding pharmaceutical processing and drug delivery. Original research papers and review articles are welcomed.

Prof. Dr. Yvonne Perrie
Dr. Afzal R. Mohammed
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmaceutics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dosage forms
  • formulation
  • pharmaceutical processing
  • process analytical technology
  • process analytical tools
  • quality by design
  • crystallization
  • milling
  • granulation
  • compaction
  • coating
  • spectroscopic technology
  • data analysis tool
  • analytical methodology
  • pharmaceutical industry

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

3200 KiB  
Article
Nanoparticle-Laden Contact Lens for Controlled Ocular Delivery of Prednisolone: Formulation Optimization Using Statistical Experimental Design
by Amr ElShaer, Shelan Mustafa, Mohamad Kasar, Sapana Thapa, Baljit Ghatora and Raid G. Alany
Pharmaceutics 2016, 8(2), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics8020014 - 20 Apr 2016
Cited by 61 | Viewed by 8124
Abstract
Human eye is one of the most accessible organs in the body, nonetheless, its physiology and associated precorneal factors such as nasolacrimal drainage, blinking, tear film, tear turnover, and induced lacrimation has significantly decreased the residence time of any foreign substances including pharmaceutical [...] Read more.
Human eye is one of the most accessible organs in the body, nonetheless, its physiology and associated precorneal factors such as nasolacrimal drainage, blinking, tear film, tear turnover, and induced lacrimation has significantly decreased the residence time of any foreign substances including pharmaceutical dosage forms. Soft contact lenses are promising delivery devices that can sustain the drug release and prolong residence time by acting as a geometric barrier to drug diffusion to tear fluid. This study investigates experimental parameters such as composition of polymer mixtures, stabilizer and the amount of active pharmaceutical ingredient on the preparation of a polymeric drug delivery system for the topical ocular administration of Prednisolone. To achieve this goal, prednisolone-loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles were prepared by single emulsion solvent evaporation method. Prednisolone was quantified using a validated high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Nanoparticle size was mostly affected by the amount of co-polymer (PLGA) used whereas drug load was mostly affected by amount of prednisolone (API) used. Longer homogenization time along with higher amount of API yielded the smallest size nanoparticles. The nanoparticles prepared had an average particle size of 347.1 ± 11.9 nm with a polydispersity index of 0.081. The nanoparticles were then incorporated in the contact lens mixture before preparing them. Clear and transparent contact lenses were successfully prepared. When the nanoparticle (NP)-loaded contact lenses were compared with control contact lenses (unloaded NP contact lenses), a decrease in hydration by 2% (31.2% ± 1.25% hydration for the 0.2 g loaded NP contact lenses) and light transmission by 8% (unloaded NP contact lenses 94.5% NP 0.2 g incorporated contact lenses 86.23%). The wettability of the contact lenses remained within the desired value (<90 °C) even upon incorporation of the NP. NP alone and NP-loaded contact lenses both displayed a slow in vitro drug release of drug over 24 h; where 42.3% and 10.8% prednisolone release were achieved, respectively. Contact lenses can be used as a medicated device to sustain ocular drug delivery and improve patient compliance; nonetheless, patients and healthcare professionals’ acceptability and perceptions of the new formulations entail further investigations. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop