Surfactants and Biomembranes: Which Implications in the Drug Delivery Field?

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Drug Delivery and Controlled Release".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021) | Viewed by 7649

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Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy, University of Camerino, Via Gentile III da Varano, Camerino, MC, Italy
Interests: surfactants; self-assembling; liposomes; nanoparticles; calorimetric techniques, ultrasound spectroscopy
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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy, Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Calabria, 87036 Rende, Italy
Interests: colloid systems; multifunctional nanoparticles; transdermal and topical delivery; polymeric nanoparticles; controlled release
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Surfactants and amphiphilic compounds are versatile excipients of large use in different technological fields, including pharmaceutics, cosmetics, and agri-food. Despite being employed as stabilizers for disperse systems (such as emulsions or suspensions) in traditional dosage forms, surfactants can also be employed for the preparation of a wide range of nanosystems, including micelles, nanoparticles, vesicles, and nano/microemulsions. The functionality of these nanosystems can be tuned in terms of drug targeting and biopharmaceutical aspects by the incorporation of surfactants. Indeed, these excipients, thanks to their amphiphilic nature, can be physically portioned inside biological membranes or, in some specific case, interact selectively with proteins or sugars exposed on or constituting lipid membranes. Actually, the field of research regarding surfactants and biomembranes is still developing, and a more extensive knowledge about this topic could promote the development of innovative amphiphilic compounds and “smart” nanocarriers able to establish selective and functional interactions with biological systems. This Special Issue welcomes studies on any aspects related to the use of surfactants (or amphiphilic compounds) to improve the performance of drug delivery systems, with a focus on biomembrane interactions.The topics of interest include: 

  • Design, synthesis, and development of innovative surfactants or amphiphilic compounds for pharmaceutical/cosmetic/nutraceutical applications.·   
  • Formulation of traditional dosage forms in which surfactants have a prominent role.
  • Formulation of “smart” nanocarriers for targeting and delivery of drugs and bioactive molecules, using surfactants or amphiphilic compounds to improve the performance of the system. 

We invite experts from academia and industry to contribute to this Special Issue with original research articles, reviews, or commentaries.

Dr. Diego Romano Perinelli
Prof. Dr. Rita Muzzalupo
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • Surfactants
  • Amphiphilic compounds
  • Amphiphilic peptides
  • Drug delivery
  • Surface-modified nanocarriers
  • Self-assembling
  • Membrane interactions

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

24 pages, 6229 KiB  
Article
Optimization and Transfollicular Delivery of Finasteride-Loaded Proniosomes for Hair Growth Stimulation in C57BL/6Mlac Mice
by Wandee Rungseevijitprapa, Panikchar Wichayapreechar, Bhagavathi Sundaram Sivamaruthi, Damrongsak Jinarat and Chaiyavat Chaiyasut
Pharmaceutics 2021, 13(12), 2177; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics13122177 - 17 Dec 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3155
Abstract
The study aimed to develop the finasteride-loaded proniosome (FLP) to enhance the transfollicular delivery of finasteride (FN). The response surface methodology (RSM) combined with central composite design (CCD) with three independent variables (FN concentrations, total lipid content, and cholesterol content) was used to [...] Read more.
The study aimed to develop the finasteride-loaded proniosome (FLP) to enhance the transfollicular delivery of finasteride (FN). The response surface methodology (RSM) combined with central composite design (CCD) with three independent variables (FN concentrations, total lipid content, and cholesterol content) was used to optimize the FLP preparation. The particles size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, and drug loading capacity of the FLP were analyzed. The transfollicular delivery of the optimum formulation was investigated in vitro. In vivo hair growth stimulation study was performed on C57BL/6Mlac mice dorsal areas. The Draize primary skin irritation test for erythema and edema was performed in the New Zealand white rabbit skin. The optimum FLP consists of 5.0 mM of FN, 10.1 mM of total lipid content, and 50.0% of the cholesterol in the total lipid. The prepared proniosome delivered the FN significantly (p < 0.05), compared to the naked finasteride solution in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The FLP treatment significantly increases the number and size of hair follicles in a dose-dependent manner. The efficiency of 1% FLP was comparable to the 2% minoxidil solution. The FLP exhibited no skin irritation after 72 h. Therefore, the results demonstrated that the FLP could stimulate hair growth via a transfollicular delivery system. Full article
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18 pages, 24751 KiB  
Article
Micellar Antibiotics of Bacillus
by William T. Ferreira, Huynh A. Hong, Mateusz Hess, James R. G. Adams, Hannah Wood, Karolina Bakun, Sisareuth Tan, Loredana Baccigalupi, Enrico Ferrari, Alain Brisson, Ezio Ricca, María Teresa Rejas, Wilfried J. J. Meijer, Mikhail Soloviev and Simon M. Cutting
Pharmaceutics 2021, 13(8), 1296; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics13081296 - 19 Aug 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3793
Abstract
Members of the Bacillus genus, particularly the “Bacillus subtilis group”, are known to produce amphipathic lipopeptides with biosurfactant activity. This includes the surfactins, fengycins and iturins that have been associated with antibacterial, antifungal, and anti-viral properties. We have screened a large collection [...] Read more.
Members of the Bacillus genus, particularly the “Bacillus subtilis group”, are known to produce amphipathic lipopeptides with biosurfactant activity. This includes the surfactins, fengycins and iturins that have been associated with antibacterial, antifungal, and anti-viral properties. We have screened a large collection of Bacillus, isolated from human, animal, estuarine water and soil samples and found that the most potent lipopeptide producers are members of the species Bacillus velezensis. B. velezensis lipopeptides exhibited anti-bacterial activity which was localised on the surface of both vegetative cells and spores. Interestingly, lipopeptide micelles (6–10 nm diameter) were detectable in strains exhibiting the highest levels of activity. Micelles were stable (heat and gastric stable) and shown to entrap other antimicrobials produced by the host bacterium (exampled here was the dipeptide antibiotic chlorotetaine). Commercially acquired lipopeptides did not exhibit similar levels of inhibitory activity and we suspect that micelle formation may relate to the particular isomeric forms produced by individual bacteria. Using naturally produced micelle formulations we demonstrated that they could entrap antimicrobial compounds (e.g., clindamycin, vancomycin and resveratrol). Micellar incorporation of antibiotics increased activity. Bacillus is a prolific producer of antimicrobials, and this phenomenon could be exploited naturally to augment antimicrobial activity. From an applied perspective, the ability to readily produce Bacillus micelles and formulate with drugs enables a possible strategy for enhanced drug delivery. Full article
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