Micro/Nanostructures and Micro/Nanodevices for Tissue Engineering and Biomedicine

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanomedicine and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 April 2024) | Viewed by 6880

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02138, USA
2. Center for Life Sciences, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
Interests: diagnostics; organ-on-chip; 2D materials; nanomedicine; vaccines; biosensors

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Guest Editor
Graduate School of Interdisciplinary New Science, Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, Kawagoe 350-8585, Japan
Interests: tissue engineering; biomaterials; therapeutics; nanomedicine; regenerative medicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanotechnology is a rapidly evolving multidisciplinary science dealing with nanoscale materials, providing a cutting-edge platform for research in tissue engineering and biomedicine, where the unique traits of distinct nanostructures permit the design of biomaterials with augmented properties. Nanoscience offers new wisdom in drug design, biosensors and chemical sensors, the targeted delivery of therapeutics, diagnosis, and theranostics in a controlled fashion for personalized health care, offering incredible benefits as chemotherapeutic agents, imaging agents, and immunotherapeutic agents for treating or diagnosing several chronic human diseases. This Special Issue will focus on the Micro/Nanostructures and Micro/Nanodevices for Tissue Engineering and Biomedicine, aiming to improve the regeneration of impaired tissues and organs using various distinct nanostructures or devices with micro/nanostructures-based architectures in drug delivery, imaging, and theranostics, but not confined to the above.

Prof. Dr. Venkatesan Renugopalakrishnan
Dr. Vivekanandan Palaninathan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • tissue engineering 
  • biomaterials 
  • theranostics 
  • diagnostics 
  • nanomedicine 
  • regenerative medicine 
  • precision medicine 
  • nano/microfluidics 
  • drug delivery 
  • biosensors 
  • organ-on-chip 
  • vaccines 
  • 3D printing 
  • nanofabrication

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 3445 KiB  
Article
Collagen Functionalization of Polymeric Electrospun Scaffolds to Improve Integration into Full-Thickness Wounds
by Aswathy Ravindran Girija, Xanthe Strudwick, Sivakumar Balasubramanian, Vivekanandan Palaninathan, Sakthikumar Dasappan Nair and Allison J. Cowin
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(3), 880; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15030880 - 8 Mar 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1438
Abstract
Background: Electrospun fibers are widely studied in regenerative medicine for their ability to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) and provide mechanical support. In vitro studies indicated that cell adhesion and migration is superior on smooth poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) electrospun scaffolds and porous scaffolds [...] Read more.
Background: Electrospun fibers are widely studied in regenerative medicine for their ability to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) and provide mechanical support. In vitro studies indicated that cell adhesion and migration is superior on smooth poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) electrospun scaffolds and porous scaffolds once biofunctionalized with collagen. Methods: The in vivo performance of PLLA scaffolds with modified topology and collagen biofunctionalization in full-thickness mouse wounds was assessed by cellular infiltration, wound closure and re-epithelialization and ECM deposition. Results: Early indications suggested unmodified, smooth PLLA scaffolds perform poorly, with limited cellular infiltration and matrix deposition around the scaffold, the largest wound area, a significantly larger panniculus gape, and lowest re-epithelialization; however, by day 14, no significant differences were observed. Collagen biofunctionalization may improve healing, as collagen-functionalized smooth scaffolds were smallest overall, and collagen-functionalized porous scaffolds were smaller than non-functionalized porous scaffolds; the highest re-epithelialization was observed in wounds treated with collagen-functionalized scaffolds. Conclusion: Our results suggest that limited incorporation of smooth PLLA scaffolds into the healing wound occurs, and that altering surface topology, particularly by utilizing collagen biofunctionalization, may improve healing. The differing performance of the unmodified scaffolds in the in vitro versus in vivo studies demonstrates the importance of preclinical testing. Full article
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9 pages, 1367 KiB  
Communication
Unveiling the Anti-Biofilm Property of Hydroxyapatite on Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Synthesis and Strategy
by Davoodbasha MubarakAli, Kannappan Arunachalam, Murugan Lakshmanan, Bazigha Badar, Jung-Wan Kim and Sang-Yul Lee
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(2), 463; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15020463 - 30 Jan 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1814
Abstract
Biofilm-related nosocomial infections may cause a wide range of life-threatening infections. In this regard, Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm is becoming a serious health burden due to its capability to develop resistance to natural and synthetic drugs. The utilization of nanoparticles that inhibit biofilm formation [...] Read more.
Biofilm-related nosocomial infections may cause a wide range of life-threatening infections. In this regard, Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm is becoming a serious health burden due to its capability to develop resistance to natural and synthetic drugs. The utilization of nanoparticles that inhibit biofilm formation is one of the major strategies to control infections caused by biofilm-forming pathogens. Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a synthetic ceramic material having properties similar to natural bones. Herein, a co-precipitation method followed by microwave treatment was used to synthesize HA nanoparticles (HANPs). The resulting HANPs were characterized using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Then, their antibiofilm properties against P. aeruginosa ATCC 10145 were examined in vitro. The needle-shaped HANPs were 30 and 90 nm long in width and length, respectively. The synthesized HANPs inhibited the biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa ATCC 10145 in a concentration-dependent manner, which was validated by light and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Hence, this study demonstrated that HANPs could be used to control the biofilm-related infections of P. aeruginosa. Full article
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Review

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31 pages, 3275 KiB  
Review
New Frontiers in Three-Dimensional Culture Platforms to Improve Diabetes Research
by Sundhar Mohandas, Vijaya Gayatri, Kriya Kumaran, Vipin Gopinath, Ramasamy Paulmurugan and Kunka Mohanram Ramkumar
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(3), 725; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15030725 - 22 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2856
Abstract
Diabetes mellitus is associated with defects in islet β-cell functioning and consequent hyperglycemia resulting in multi-organ damage. Physiologically relevant models that mimic human diabetic progression are urgently needed to identify new drug targets. Three-dimensional (3D) cell-culture systems are gaining a considerable interest in [...] Read more.
Diabetes mellitus is associated with defects in islet β-cell functioning and consequent hyperglycemia resulting in multi-organ damage. Physiologically relevant models that mimic human diabetic progression are urgently needed to identify new drug targets. Three-dimensional (3D) cell-culture systems are gaining a considerable interest in diabetic disease modelling and are being utilized as platforms for diabetic drug discovery and pancreatic tissue engineering. Three-dimensional models offer a marked advantage in obtaining physiologically relevant information and improve drug selectivity over conventional 2D (two-dimensional) cultures and rodent models. Indeed, recent evidence persuasively supports the adoption of appropriate 3D cell technology in β-cell cultivation. This review article provides a considerably updated view of the benefits of employing 3D models in the experimental workflow compared to conventional animal and 2D models. We compile the latest innovations in this field and discuss the various strategies used to generate 3D culture models in diabetic research. We also critically review the advantages and the limitations of each 3D technology, with particular attention to the maintenance of β-cell morphology, functionality, and intercellular crosstalk. Furthermore, we emphasize the scope of improvement needed in the 3D culture systems employed in diabetes research and the promises they hold as excellent research platforms in managing diabetes. Full article
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